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Author Topic: Best dry food for a dog with skin allergies?  (Read 6852 times)
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EricV
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« on: October 05, 2007, 09:48:47 AM »

Can anyone tell me what the best dry food is for a dog with skin allergies? I've looked into Wellness (what our cats eat), Solid Gold, and some others. But I'm unsure. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!  Smiley
« Last Edit: October 05, 2007, 09:52:27 AM by EricV » Logged
straybaby
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2007, 10:33:42 AM »

what's the pup eating now and what type of skin allergies?

many people go venison or duck for allergies and limit it to one or no grains. but if it's a yeast type allergy you want to avoid potatoes.
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EricV
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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2007, 01:31:34 PM »

The only thing in his food right now that it could be is corn, I would think. Here's the ingredients:

Corn Meal, Chicken Meal, Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols [a source of Vitamin E] and Citric Acid), Dried Beet Pulp, Lamb Meal, Menhaden Fish Meal, Chicken Liver Meal, Egg Product, Dried Cheese, Rice, Dried Kelp Meal, Flax Seed Meal, Cod Liver Oil, Yeast Culture, Linoleic Acid, Lecithin, Salt, Monocalcium Phosphate, Potassium Amino Acid Complex, Sodium Bicarbonate, Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation Extract, Dried Aspergillus Niger Fermentation Extract, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Zinc Chloride, Manganese Sulfate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Cobalt Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite, Rosemary Extract, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D-3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Choline Chloride, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Ascorbic Acid, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin B-12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (source of Vitamin B-6), Folic Acid, Biotin, Inositol, Calcium Iodate, Yucca Schidigera Extract
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kittylyda
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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2007, 02:40:59 PM »

The only thing in his food right now that it could be is corn, I would think. Here's the ingredients:


Could be anything, but I think egg, fish and cheese are also high on the allergy list.
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Laurie
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« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2007, 03:27:00 PM »

    EricV, When dealing with food sensitivities or allergies it is best to change the protein source first. Since the food you have been using has chicken, lamb and fish in it, I would seek out a food that contains none of these and also find one that does not contain any corn or egg product. It may take a few food trials before the you find the right one. The Simple Food Solutions by Wellness seems like a good choice for this. Or you could get your dog tested for allergies but I have heard that they are not always 100% accurate.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2007, 03:44:50 PM by Laurie » Logged
lesliek
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« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2007, 04:43:40 PM »

EricV- The dried beet pulp,yeast & probiotics could also be the allergen. A lot of probiotics come from beef. Also if you use Heartguard it is from beef.Some on Itchmo have also narrowed allergies down to kelp. I would try the Wellness simple solutions & add foods slowly from that if you have no problems with it.Nutritionists usually suggest  an exotic protein source & no grain or potato to start.
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Laurie
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« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2007, 06:32:16 PM »

   Probiotics do not come from beef. They are derived from fermented food sources such as yogurt, buttermilk, and kefir, to name just a few. Potatoes are used in many hypo allergenic diets and is not considered an item that dogs or cats are allergic to.
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EricV
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« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2007, 07:39:26 PM »

Thank you all for your responses. I've been looking into several foods, and the information provided here will certainly help me narrow down my choices.
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shibadiva
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« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2007, 06:08:24 AM »

I would also dump the grain. Corn is the first ingredient.

My guys were always itchy with hotspots when they were eating kibble with grain. This year, on Wellness and then Orijen, they have been fine.
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lesliek
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« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2007, 07:07:32 AM »

Some of the new probiotics have ingredients from animal digestive systems in them. Potatos are less likely than grains but some animals are allergic to them.My sister in laws dog is. Grass,beef,lamb & potatos.The beet pulp is usually more a sugar problem though.
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Laurie
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« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2007, 09:17:09 AM »

Some of the new probiotics have ingredients from animal digestive systems in them.
There is only one probiotic formula made for dogs that I know of that has animal digest in it and I believe it is made by Purina. Probiotics are not derived from beef and quality probiotic supplements have no added fillers. I use dairy free probiotics for my cats.  Since the food EricV is feeding at the moment has no potatoes listed in the ingredient panel, the potatoes would be considered a novel ingredient in a food for his dog.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2007, 10:04:19 AM by Laurie » Logged
yl
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« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2007, 10:24:43 AM »

Be careful of potatos in food . Does anyone think the pet food companies buy the best potaoes to put in pet food? I have to wonder if they get the ones that aren't fit for human consumption the ones with lots of green in them? Do the pet food companies remove green potatoes and do they remove the potato plant or does that also go in the food?
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EricV
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« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2007, 11:00:36 AM »

Single source protein and single source carb is the best way to start. Food with fewer ingredients and not so much extra supplements would be good. orijen and Natures Variety are 2 good foods that are grain free. You could try them. Misty had skin issues before I switched to NV. Seems to have cleared up for now.

The store where we buy our cats' Wellness carries Natures Variety, so I may look into that. They also carry Natura products, Canidae, and Solid Gold.
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lesliek
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« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2007, 04:47:32 PM »

I like to hear a pf co is responsive to customers & vets inquiries & proactive about info on their web site. If they are open & honest I feel more trust in their food. Have been strictly homemade for months but recently have tried a few pieces of NV raw instinct for treats. So far no problems.
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Scratch
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« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2007, 05:57:55 PM »

Eric,

How old is your dog and what breed?  Do you give treats?  How long has the 'allergy' been there?  What specifically are the symptoms?  Who gives the dog a bath?  Has he/she been on other foods?

Of all the good suggestions, I would go with the Nature's Variety.  Either the Salmon or the Venison.  You could also look at California Natural Herring and Sweet Potato.  Choose a treat that is of the same protein and carb.  Timberwolf Elk and Salmon is a great food to try also.  Although TW has gotten very pricey and can be difficult to find.

I would suggest you save all ingredient panels, including the one your dog is on now.  Document everything you notice and on which foods and treats.

There should be slow improvement.  Usually takes at least 3 months to get to 90%.  You need to pick a food and start with a small bag to make sure there is no adverse reaction.

Good luck,
Scratch
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