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Author Topic: Problems with Alfalfa  (Read 14309 times)
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Laurie
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« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2008, 01:40:13 PM »

  Upon looking at the Life's Abundance dry cat food, there is another ingredient in the food that could be causing the irritation, and that is Brewers Yeast. Many cats and dogs can be allergic to it.  http://www.pets4life.com/index.php?p=research/articles/16
« Last Edit: March 25, 2008, 01:52:16 PM by Laurie » Logged
sharky
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Posts: 431


« Reply #16 on: March 25, 2008, 04:09:26 PM »

  Upon looking at the Life's Abundance dry cat food, there is another ingredient in the food that could be causing the irritation, and that is Brewers Yeast. Many cats and dogs can be allergic to it.  http://www.pets4life.com/index.php?p=research/articles/16

also the beet pulp ... my vet has noted a HUGE jump in allergies to beet pulp once again it is a processing issue Embarrassed
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Scratch
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« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2008, 09:18:39 PM »

I developed Rheumatoid Arthritis, diagnosed 1 1/2 years ago.  I find that if I eat anything with wheat gluten it throws my body into an allergy type attack.  Post nasal, acid reflux, heartburn.  Interesting.
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mainecoonpeg
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« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2008, 01:35:32 PM »

Thought you folks might want to take a look at this.........

Alfalfa Toxic for Animals?
Answered by: Conrad Richter
Question from: Lucy Wilkinson
Posted on: May 7, 2002

I have been doing some research about using herbs to treat animals, and have come across a question I can't seem to find the answer to. Many herbal preparations for pets seem to use alfalfa (Medicago sativa), yet I have just found alfalfa on a list of herbs that are considered toxic to animals (from a database at the University of Illinois Veterinary Medicine Library). The database has no explanation of why it is toxic, it just presents pictures. I also noticed that it has not been updated since 1996! I can't seem to contact anybody there to find out what's going on. Do you have any knowledge of this?

That alfalfa could be considered toxic for animals is news to us. Alfalfa is one of the most benign herbs we know. Of course, individuals may develop allergies, even life threatening ones, to just about anything, including alfalfa. But as far as we know alfalfa is safe for both humans and animals.

There are reports suggesting that some of the constituents of alfalfa could be dangerous. The trouble is that these assertions, as far as we can make out from the literature, are more theory than reality. For example, alfalfa sprouts are known to contain the toxic amino acid canavanine. But by the time alfalfa sprouts are ready to eat the concentration is so low that it does not present a problem to human health. Canavanine in high concentrations can indeed be toxic, so its presence in alfalfa seeds probably rang some alarm bells.

If you look hard enough you will find toxic substances in just about anything including safe foods that you and I eat every day. The question is not be the presence or absence of these substances, but their levels. Years of practical experience growing and eating alfalfa seem to confirm that levels of canavanine are too low to present risks. In an article on the myths of natural toxins in sprouts (http://www.isga-sprouts.org/myths.htm), Warren Peary and William Peavy, Ph.D, wrote:

"While some writers may make canavanine sound like a dangerous carcinogen – it isn't. Canavanine is a non-protein amino acid that's toxic in high amounts. In the dry seed it serves as a storage protein, a growth inhibitor, and a defense against natural predators. As you might guess, as the sprout grows, canavanine falls rapidly to insignificant levels. The text, 'Seed Physiology', clearly states that 'Canavanine... is non-toxic to mammals at low concentration.'

"Canavanine is so irrelevant that the 1980 text, Toxic Constituents of Plant Foodstuffs, doesn't even mention it. A 150-pound human would have to consume 14,000 milligrams of canavanine all at once for it to be toxic at the same level it is toxic in mice. This is an incredible amount! It is doubtful that with a generous helping of alfalfa sprouts, you would get more than a few milligrams."

There are credible reports that alfalfa hay can present a danger to animals if it is contaminated. Alfalfa hay contaminated with poisonous weeds has been known to injure animals. There is also a beetle called the "blister beetle" that contains a natural toxin called cantharidin that has been known to kill livestock. Reportedly just 50 beetles can kill a horse. Blister beetles are common in southern U.S. states, but they have reached as far north as Michigan. Blister beetles feed on alfalfa blossoms so late cuts can end up being contaminated with enough blister beetles to endanger animals. For more information see http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/aganswers/1997/9-30Could_AKiller.html.

 
 
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Laurie
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« Reply #19 on: March 26, 2008, 02:24:40 PM »

 peg, Thank you for finding that info and posting it. I am using a food for my cats that contains alfalfa and have experienced no problems. I also give them a vit/mineral/herbal supplement that contains alfalfa. This is not to say that there might be those who are sensitive to it.  As far as beet pulp is concerned, I can find no info that it causes any problems in cats, although again there may be some who are. According to the Dog Food Project " I have actually not had a single case where I pinpointed beet pulp as the cause of problems, whereas the opposite is true for rice bran".  http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=dog_food_reviews  In this article found at petwellbeing.com "The causes and triggers  of cat allergies are numerous and varied. The most common cause of allergy symptoms in cats, however, is fleas. Other substances that frequently cause an allergic response in felines are beef, eggs, dairy, yeast, chicken ,pork and rice as well as pollens, mold and mosquitoes".  http://pethealth.petwellbeing.com/wiki/Cat_Allergies
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sharky
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Posts: 431


« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2008, 02:44:57 PM »

peg, Thank you for finding that info and posting it. I am using a food for my cats that contains alfalfa and have experienced no problems. I also give them a vit/mineral/herbal supplement that contains alfalfa. This is not to say that there might be those who are sensitive to it.  As far as beet pulp is concerned, I can find no info that it causes any problems in cats, although again there may be some who are. According to the Dog Food Project " I have actually not had a single case where I pinpointed beet pulp as the cause of problems, whereas the opposite is true for rice bran".  http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=dog_food_reviews  In this article found at petwellbeing.com "The causes and triggers  of cat allergies are numerous and varied. The most common cause of allergy symptoms in cats, however, is fleas. Other substances that frequently cause an allergic response in felines are beef, eggs, dairy, yeast, chicken ,pork and rice as well as pollens, mold and mosquitoes".  http://pethealth.petwellbeing.com/wiki/Cat_Allergies

the beet pulp is from the vets who are seeing it routinely now when never was a issue... it is another processing issue... like alfalfa has a purpose but Smiley... Beet pulp is NOW on the traditional allergy test list as 8th for dogs the number for cats is unavail to me but my own two vets say it is high ( one said second to fish )... I would not really listen to one saying beef is a HUGE issue with cats as many are never exposed Smiley

fleas are a BIG allergen for those who have them ... here they are rare
« Last Edit: March 26, 2008, 02:58:46 PM by sharky » Logged
kaffe
Guest
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2008, 03:17:26 PM »

Wow!  Thank you Peg for posting that article!  It has somewhat comforted me becuase I like eating alfalfa --- I like it as a relish on ham sandwiches!

And you know, the good doc is right about many many food stuffs we and our animals eat often have minute toxins in them... the question is always dosage... long ago, some naturalist healer - it may have been Hippocrates - said something like there is a fine line between a substance being toxic and it being remedial.... many if not most of our medicines (herbal or chemical) is like this.... many of our natural foods too...
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sharky
Sr. Member
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Posts: 431


« Reply #22 on: March 26, 2008, 03:25:02 PM »

Wow!  Thank you Peg for posting that article!  It has somewhat comforted me becuase I like eating alfalfa --- I like it as a relish on ham sandwiches!

And you know, the good doc is right about many many food stuffs we and our animals eat often have minute toxins in them... the question is always dosage... long ago, some naturalist healer - it may have been Hippocrates - said something like there is a fine line between a substance being toxic and it being remedial.... many if not most of our medicines (herbal or chemical) is like this.... many of our natural foods too...
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YEAH aint that right...lol.. going thru that with me at the moment
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