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Author Topic: New, Grain-Free FirstMate Cat Food  (Read 11776 times)
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Sophie
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« on: July 09, 2007, 01:09:21 PM »

Has anyone tried the new FirstMate Cat Food?

http://firstmate.com/cat/fishPotatoCat.htm

I just bought my first bag last week and my cats won't stop talking about it!  Literally, they have been meowing for more ever since we started feeding it.  I am very happy to be feeding something that is Grain Free, and Chicken Free, as chicken seems not to agree with my girls.  I am also very excited about the antioxidents from the Blueberries. 

I am curious to know how others' cats are doing on this food...
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Sophie
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2007, 02:59:30 PM »

Laurie,

It's my understanding that MSM is good for joint health.  I take a MSM, Condroitin, Glucosamine pill every day for my joints and it seems to be helping me.  As for the chicken fat, it is protein free.  My allergy vet told me that allergies come from proteins.  So far, no problems.
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Laurie
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2007, 03:09:40 PM »

   OOps! Sorry my mistake. I was confusing MSM with something else. Still very leary of those who promote a food on so many threads. I agree with artzwild about the vitamin K. Also has salt added. Some that are allergic to a specific protein can also be allergic to the fats or oils of that particular meat or fish. My cat is allergic to fish and most fish oils.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2007, 03:23:35 PM by Laurie » Logged
JustMe
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2007, 03:51:00 PM »

Ummm....what exactly is MSM?  Is it methylsulfonylmethane?  Or something else?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylsulfonylmethane

I don't understand why that would be used in food for a healthy pet.  I have one dog and one cat on Cosequin, one for arthritis and the other for hip dysplasia, but I don't give it to my other cats. 

Or is it there for the bladder connection?

Interstitial cystitis: In 1978, the FDA approved dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for instillation into the bladder as a treatment for interstitial cystitis. Since DMSO is metabolized to MSM by the body, it is possible that MSM is the active ingredient in DMSO treatments (Childs 1994).
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Laurie
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2007, 03:57:10 PM »

  JustMe, yes it is methylsulfonymethane. It can be taken for a variety of conditions. http://peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=0&cat=1448&articleid=1356
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jenny
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2007, 04:41:40 PM »

I think for humans it is sometimes combined with glucosamine for joints.
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Barbaram
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2007, 02:11:02 PM »

I've just heard about First Mate cat food also.  I'm going to look into it myself along with some others I've heard good about.

Barbaram
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JJ
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 03:40:43 PM »

Another food I listed a topic on is from: www.greatlife4pets.com This is also a no grain food for cats and dogs. I received an email response in 2 days as to where I could purchase the food in my state. On their site they list exactly what is NOT in it and has NO IMPORTED INGREDIENTS nor MELAMINE. Would like to know if anyone is using this food and how your babies liked or did not like it and how they are doing as I'm looking to replace the Karma I used to feed my dog.
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petslave
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2007, 04:07:59 PM »

JJ--I think I've seen a few comments on the Great Life products on the forums.  Maybe try a search on the home page for the name.

I've seen the First Mate foods out in a few local pet stores for 4 months, but the grainless cat food is a new offereing from them.  I didn't really like some of the ingredients in the other foods, looked kind of low end specialty food if you can call something that. 

My concern about it is the all-fish protein source, I've seen this in dog foods but can't think of an all fish dry for cats.  I couldn't open some of their pages because they seemed to be pdfs that my dial-up can't handle.  Did anyone see anything there about ethoxyquin?  It should say human grade fish or no ethoxyquin, something like that.  That's a consideration when fish is used.  Not sure how I feel about daily doses of MSM either, kind of strange that one is in there.

BUT--it's not made by any of the big plants affected by the recall, so might be a good one to add to the occasional feeding list.

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Laurie
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« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2007, 04:20:29 PM »

 In the First Mate cat food, Herring Meal is listed as the protein source in the cat food. I see no mention of it being ethoxyquin free. Potato flakes is the second ingredient.  Huh  Does not say what the carb content is either. California Natural by Natura is another one that comes in a Herring and Sweet Potato formula for both cats znd dogs.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2007, 05:31:12 PM by Laurie » Logged
JJ
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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2007, 06:24:16 PM »

petslave the great life food does not contain any fish or potato either + grain free. Made for cats and dogs. Thx for info will do a search and see what comes up for the Great Life on here.
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ancona
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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2007, 02:22:38 PM »

If I read the Coast Guard Regs, all fish has to be preserved with ethoxoquin.  Be it for humans and or animals.

Also, how about the fish coming from China??  I am very suspicious of any fish in dog and cat foods.  Also, I no longer eat any fish, disgusting. 

If the company making the foods does not add ethoxoquin, they do not have to list it.


Sandi
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Laurie
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2007, 02:36:23 PM »

ancona, That is correct. If something is already in the meat or fish, it does not have to be disclosed. Only items that are added to the food have to be listed on the labels. I would guess that at least 95% of all cat food has some type of fish or fish meal in it.  Shocked
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petslave
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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2007, 07:53:55 PM »

I thought the rule was if it was NOT for human use it had to be preserved with ethoxyquin.  That's what a number of pet sites say anyway.  Does someone have a link for the definitive version of info?
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dingbat
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« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2007, 04:40:20 PM »

Quote
Does someone have a link for the definitive version of info?

petslave

This is what I have found, mostly in pet food and other animal food but it does end up in human tissue when you eat an animal that has fed upon it. the following from this link

http://petcaretips.net/ethoxyquin.html

"The U. S. Dept. of Agriculture for toxicology information lists ethoxyquin in their Farm Chemical Hand-Book as a pesticide, used in fruit scald control. It is also used as a rubber preservative. It is FDA approved for use as an antioxidant for carotenes vitamin A and E and the prevention of the development of organic peroxides.

It is approved at 150 ppm in paprika and chili powder, and because it is used as a preservative in livestock feed, the following residue allowances in human consumed animal products as follows: 5 ppm in or on the uncooked fat of meat from animals except poultry; 3 ppm in or on the uncooked liver and fat of poultry, 0.5 ppm in or on the uncooked muscle meat of animals, 0.5 ppm in poultry eggs, and zero in milk.

The above information brings up the question why the FDA allows such a small amount of ethoxyquin residue (5 to .5 ppm) in human consumed foods yet allows such high amounts (150 ppm) to be used in pet food and livestock feeds?

In the case of the dog, pound for pound, a dog is consuming up to 300 times more ethoxyquin than allowed for people. (depending upon the weight) Also many dog food manufacturers are not always listing it as an ingredient on the packaging, but sometimes merely print "E"."


Hope this helps

db Undecided
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