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Author Topic: Long Term Use of Deramaxx  (Read 3869 times)
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notherdirtybird
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« on: March 02, 2008, 11:31:47 AM »

Wiggles is finally starting to show his age. He's limping a bit (he has arthritis is one knee that we know of). We don't let him go up and down the stairs anymore, and he must be lifted on and off the couch. It's obvious he's in some pain, and we're trying to find what's best for him.

He's already on glucosamine and chondroitin daily to try to stop his condition furthering. We want some pain meds. Wiggles has been on deramaxx short term in the past, and it's always seemed to add extra spunk into his step. My question is, does anyone know of any long term side effects of Deramaxx? He'd probably be on it the rest of his life, and I don't know what that could do to him. I'd love other recommendations for pains meds as well.

We're making a call to the vet tomorrow to ask what he thinks. I know Deramaxx is expensive, but price isn't an issue. The whole family just wants what's best for Wiggs.
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"there's the known. and there's the unknown. and what separates the two is the door, and that's what i wanta be. ahh wanna be th' doooooorrrr..." JIM MORRISON
JustMe
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 01:07:43 PM »

Welcome to the forum, notherdirtybird!

With any pain relievers, I am always concerned about liver and kidney failure.

To say I'm not a fan of COX-2 inhibitors for people or animals would be an understatement.  Too many side-effects IMO.  However, lots of people swear by them.

Be sure you do a lot of research.  Lots of reports.  You need to following directions exactly and if I recall never feed on an empty stomach.

Also check out problems with COX-2 inhibitors for people.  Some were withdrawn from the market. 

Did have 2 previous GSDs on this product in the past.  They both had good relief, however, both developed bloody diarrhea.  One dog collapsed with a high fever and died within 24 hours after vomiting up a huge volume green substance (per ER).  He was an epileptic on seizure medication and may have been septic from a skin infection.  Could not afford the necropsy, so I don't know what killed him.  He was only 7 at the time.  I did report to authorities at the time. 

Our vet had recommended this when it was new and I didn't do my homework.  Shame on me.  At that time, it was only approved for postsurgical pain, not on a daily basis.

The other dog was fine after medication was stopped and went onto live another 5 years to the age of 14.  She had hip/spine problems the last few years and we gave her Adequan injections which helped a lot.  It's not a pain-reliever.  You might want to look into whether that product would be of any benefit.  It also has possible side-effects.

Anyway, sorry to lay something heavy like this on you, but do your research first and decide if the benefits outweigh the risks of pain relievers.
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lesliek
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2008, 01:16:46 PM »

A few mo's back I did a search on pain relievers & anti inflammatories , I will look for the site I found. It listed all the different drugs,uses & side effects.I don't remember whether or not I saved it, but I found it doing a google search.The vet whose site it was,recommended using them with extreme caution.
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notherdirtybird
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« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2008, 01:42:19 PM »

After just now googling "Deramaxx and side effects" it appears that this is not going to be an option for us. Liver and kidney damage is not worth it in the long run. I will still print some claims out and talk to my vet about them, just to hear his opinion. It's funny that Deramaxx is commonly used long-term, but only comes in 7 pills per bottle! Also, I didn't get the link to Vioxx until this research, but I should have. I had a feeling there was a dark side to Deramaxx, just like Rimadyl (Wiggles was on that short term for a back injury, and that did not go well).

On another note, has anyone tried acupuncture? That's the only other option I can think of at the moment. I've heard great things about it, so I'll definitely keep it as an option. Thanks for the information, both of you.
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"there's the known. and there's the unknown. and what separates the two is the door, and that's what i wanta be. ahh wanna be th' doooooorrrr..." JIM MORRISON
lesliek
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2008, 02:57:23 PM »

I didn't find the site I remembered,but here are the 1's I did save:
http://www.drugs.com/vet-a-to-z-treatment-list.html
http://www.dogaware.com/index.html
http://www.naturalpetcare.co.uk/ailment.htm
http://www.veterinarypartner.com
 My cousin[who is a trad. vet] has used accupunture & massage therapy,from a holistic vet for her older rottie with success. The thing that she thinks has helped Rose the most is swimming. There are 2 indoor animal pools near her.They are set up for injured horses & dogs,& you can hook them by guide lines to a harness & walk down the sides to get them to do laps.Good luck finding something that will help.
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pygmypets
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2008, 03:33:05 PM »

Lelsiek..thank you for posting these  links. Esp like Drugs com.Added to my bookmarks. Have learned so much here. thank you
« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 03:35:45 PM by pygmypets » Logged
dingbat
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2008, 04:16:40 PM »

To all

ALL NSAIDS have side effects. Some dogs will tolerate them better than others, the nsaid should be given with meals. A liver test should be done before starting them on any nsaid, and then every year (6 months) thereafter to check liver function.

I wouldn't give up on them right away, talk to the vet, and yes they are pricey, but if they work.

Currently have 2 older females on an nsaid, keep in mind that all dogs tolerate these differently and one may make the dog sick, the other may work, many of them out there, derramax, metacam, etogesic, rimadyl, all the same but a little different.

The other thing we do is ONLY give them when the dog needs them, NOT EVERY DAY, have been doing this on and off for years, with no ill results. Typically winter time, rest of the year they don't need them and don't get them.

good luck

db
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notherdirtybird
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« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2008, 04:45:24 PM »

I'm still keeping Deramaxx as an option, but the vet is going to have to give me some pretty solid proof. Wiggles is about due for another blood test, anyways, so that's good timing. If that clears, then I want to at least have some for his really bad days, while they still remain far apart.

Thanks for the websites, lesliek. I bookmarked them for future reference.
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"there's the known. and there's the unknown. and what separates the two is the door, and that's what i wanta be. ahh wanna be th' doooooorrrr..." JIM MORRISON
Jean T
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2008, 01:06:05 AM »

Having lost a dog to the adverse side effects of Rimadyl on Oct. 13, 1997, I have for almost 11 years now heard from dog owners whose pets have had adverse reactions to not only Rimadyl, but Deramaxx, and similar drugs called NSAIDS.

I say, less is best, - know the adverse side effects and if your vet doesn't do pre-testing and give you the "Client Information Sheet" that should accompany prescriptions of these "potent" drugs - look for one who does.

Some excellent information can be found at:  http://www.dogsadversereactions.com/

Jean
(Always for George - Always for the Rimadyl Dogs)
B.A.R.K.S.
Be Aware of Rimadyl's Known Side-effects
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dingbat
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« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2008, 10:22:39 AM »

I am glad that this topic came up.

First of all the use of NSAIDS is USUALLY a catch-22 situation. Give the dog/cat a drug to help them walk and then take your chances on liver damage, OR put the animal down because they can't walk.

These are not easy choices.

JeanT

Sorry about the loss of your pet.
Just had to put one down in DEC 2007 because his legs went out, he was 14.
Have 2 girls and 1 boy on etogesic as needed, usually in the winter.

Long term use of any of these drugs will damage internal organs, but what are the choices??

not a pleasant situation to be in

db
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