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Author Topic: CBD Oil  (Read 3656 times)
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rbauer
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« on: December 12, 2016, 04:17:53 PM »

Has anyone tried CBD oil with their cat instead of  NSAIDs, Opiates, etc?  A lady at our veterinary clinic suggested it when I was inquiring about Onsior.   
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Mandycat
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« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2016, 09:55:04 PM »

I have actually never heard of CBD oil.  I looked it up and based on this article, I don't think I would use it at the present time.  It has not been well researched as of yet and the formulations may not contain the right substances that would make it safe for cats.  Sounds risky at this time.

           http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/is-medical-marijuana-safe-for-pets-a-case-for-more-study
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rbauer
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« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2016, 01:07:05 PM »

Thank you for posting that article.  It does seem a little risky now.

As an alternative, have you heard of anyone giving Onsior low dose every few days and long term for feline osteoarthritis in the back and hip dyplasia ?
« Last Edit: December 15, 2016, 01:10:53 PM by rbauer » Logged
Mandycat
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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2016, 11:43:37 PM »

To my knowledge, Onsior is not usually used in that way.  NSAIDs are not well tolerated by cats in any case.  Glucosamine is what is usually used for cats with arthritis.  I would try that before anything else.
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lesliek
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« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2016, 06:23:20 AM »

Does your vet offer laser treatments ? There are many different treatments available that may help if it won't freak out the cat .
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"the world's most inept extortionist"
rbauer
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« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2016, 07:02:37 AM »

There is glucosamine condroitin in her Royal Canine Satiety food.  is it enough for therapeutic effect?  She just started the diet in hopes that if she loses weight it will help the hips a little.  She is a small frame DSH but weighs 14.5 lbs.  when we got her she was only 11.5 lbs so that's our goal to work towards.  I found one veterinarian in Langhorne that does laser and acupuncture. The pictures of the kitties with needles stuck in their head and back are a little unsettling to look at.  I don't know.  The doctor does Reiki also.
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Mandycat
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« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2016, 09:51:06 PM »

The amount of glucosamine chondroitin in the food is probably minimal, but you can try it for a while and see if it helps.  The guaranteed analysis just states the amount as the amount per kg of food.  You would have to do a calculation to see how much is actually contained in the amount of food you are feeding her, and I suspect that is going to be a low number.  The supplements contain an amount per capsule which you can see at this website that describes one particular brand of this supplement.

           http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=3261+1955+3571&pcatid=3571

Your vet should be able to give you some guidance on this.
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mikken
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« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2016, 11:38:55 AM »

Onsior is my go-to pain med of choice!

There was a study my vet told me about where they gave Onsior to CKD cats and not only was there no indication that Onsior negatively affected the kidney numbers, some cats' numbers actually IMPROVED slightly.  The thought is that because it reduces inflammation, it may be removing some of the stressors that can affect kidneys.

Now, my personal experience with it?  I adopted a 15 year old cat in renal failure from the shelter.  He also had terrible hips (of course, he was a breeder cast off - Ragdoll).  My vet prescribed Onsior every other day for him at first and it helped immensely.  When that wasn't enough (some months down the line) he went to Onsior every day.  Our goal was quality of life.  And with a renal failure cat who had been sorely neglected (previous owner had no idea he was ill, she was just done with him), we felt that we had nothing at all to lose and everything to gain if it kept him more comfortable.

That cat lived in my care for 14 months and he did VERY well.  He would toddle around the garden and enjoy the sunshine, made his needs known with a loud yowl (his hearing wasn't great), and could get himself up on the bed right up until the end (thanks to the Onsior).

Would he have lived longer without the Onsior?  I'll never know.  But from what I knew of his pain levels, I imagine that without that relief, I would have had to put him down much sooner just because his hips hurt so badly.  So Onsior made a HUGE difference for him.  HUGE.

My vet tells me now that it is being prescribed more and more for chronic pain even though that's off-label at the moment and vet conferences discuss the use of Onsior for long term conditions and the results are favorable.

So.  My advice would be to see if you can get it prescribed for daily or every other day use and just go with regular blood checks to make sure that nothing is amiss. 

Chronic pain is sucksville and no one should have to deal with it, imo.

We have so few choices of anti inflammatories for cats, this one worth more than gold or diamonds to me.  And I would not hesitate to use it long term again, should the need arise. 
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Mandycat
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2016, 12:48:04 AM »

Perhaps more studies can be done to see if Onsior is safe to use on a more regular basis for cats.  But, at the moment it is approved for use for only 3 days under certain circumstances.  With a medication that is that restricted, I would be really scared of using it every day not knowing the long-term effects.  There must be a reason for such a strong restriction on use.  Dogs can use it regularly and long-term.  But that is the case with all NSAIDs and dogs.  Cats don't tolerate that category of drugs very well except for short term specific uses.  Just my opinion, but I wouldn't use it.   
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mikken
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2016, 04:35:59 PM »

It has six days for cats in Europe, my ortho vet told me.  Getting the licensing in the US is a slow process and dogs are only supposed to get it for three days in the US right now, too.  Europe's rules (and probably Canada) are different.

I used it on a cat who had extensive hardware put in both front legs, too.  She was on it for... at least a month (would have to check my records to be sure).  But with seven screws and two plates in each leg, there was no way I was skimping on pain meds for her.

Her current blood work is perfect! 

But I understand being cautious.  I suppose I have more experience using it than your average cat owner (having used it long term on one cat and a month or more on three others) and all of my experiences have been positive.  Doesn't mean a bad experience can't happen, of course.  I just think it's safer and more effective than anything else we currently have available for cats.

And for an older cat whose quality of life is an issue?  Well, there's not much choice for me, there.  Pain control is essential for quality of life. 
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rbauer
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« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2016, 07:15:45 AM »

If we go the Onsior route it would have to be used indefinitely probably for years until something better is available.  I think it would work and give her a good quality of life but I have yet to find any data on that kind of extended usage.  Do the Europeans actually use it long term?  I spoke with an animal hospital whose doctors all just attended a holistic veterinary medicine continuing education class and they received a lot of information on cannabidiol.  The technician said that there was excitement and enthusiasm about CBD oil because it works well on inflammation, so I'm still thinking about that as an option.   The Vetstreet article that Mandycat posted was from 2014 so there has been a couple years for the practitioners to get some experience- I wish Vetstreet or someone reputable like them would revisit the topic and produce an updated article.   Haven't found any negative posts or anecdotal stories yet in various forums and blogs but am still searching/reading- there are some articles/posts elsewhere that express confusion or uncertainty about the concentration of CBD in the extracts and dosing but nothing really negative yet except that one company's product supposedly contains no CBD in it.  I've also been looking at additional glucosamine/chondroitin formulas to supplement the Royal Canin Satiety.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2016, 07:19:43 AM by rbauer » Logged
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