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Author Topic: What happens to some tainted products? "reclaimed" into new ones!  (Read 3722 times)
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catbird
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« on: November 28, 2011, 06:21:23 PM »

http://vitals.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/11/23/8982673-a-second-chance-for-faulty-food-fda-calls-it-reconditioning

I've been following this story about the moldy applesauce that was repackaged and sent to school lunch programs.  (Major yuk factor.) Seems that they don't do this just with pet food.  If they can mix it with enough stuff to dilute it below the legal limit, manufacturers can try to get away with all sorts of things, some of which the FDA doesn't find out about until later.
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caylee
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2011, 07:48:10 PM »

Certain types of 'reconditioning' are OK, such as misshapen loaves of bread being made up into dressing. Or even things like batter that is missing the salt, being added into correct batches of the same product. That type of thing is not, however, the same as mixing moldy product with good products.

I agree, that companies are going way too far when contaminated products are used in this way.

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Mandycat
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 10:47:15 PM »

Thank goodness the moldy applesauce never actually made it to school childrens' lunches.  I really don't have a problem with food being reconditioned if it is then safe.  I'd rather this be done than waste the food and cause my grocery bill to be higher than it already is.  From what the article said, dilution is not allowed.  There must be other processes done that render the food safe before it is reconditioned and sold.  Even if we grow our own food, there is no guarantee that we won't have a certain amount of dirt or bugs that are overlooked when we cook it.  We don't live in a sterile world after-all.  Fortunately, cooking renders most contamination harmless.  But, there are still a good number of people who get sick from home-canned products.  I also think of all the people in the world who would just love to have those reconditioned food items who are starving.  Looking at the big picture, we are pretty fortunate.
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catbird
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 06:09:27 AM »

To me, as caylee said, there is a big difference between grinding up misshapen pasta to put in a new batch, and trying to re-package moldy applesauce.  And apparently it's similar in the minds of the FDA inspectors, as well, per the article I cited.  What irks me is that the companies have no common sense about what's safe to do and what's not, or more likely, have no ethics and just don't care, anything to make a buck, and then the FDA finds out about things like the applesauce much further down the line.

The FDA caught this one, but how many do they not catch?

It's really a question of ethics.  I don't believe for one minute that the shady side of these practices lowers food costs to the consumer in any significant way.  What I do believe is that it fattens the profits of those who already have plenty, or too much.
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JJ
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 08:09:19 PM »

Here is more on the re-working/re-packaging of mouldy, mislabelled or outright contaminated foods that are turned into profitable goods. And with an OK from the FDA letting the companies know there 'practices' are fine. HuH?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2067330/How-food-manufacturers-turn-mouldy-mislabelled-outright-contaminated-foods-edible--profitable--goods.html#ixzz1f3AfVaRv
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