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Author Topic: National Steak & Poutry Recalls 248,000 lbs tenderized steaks XMas Eve  (Read 4258 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: December 26, 2009, 10:12:19 AM »

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5BP1AA20091226
Oklahoma firm recalling beef products in six states
CHICAGO
Sat Dec 26, 2009 12:31pm EST

CHICAGO (Reuters) - An Oklahoma company said it was voluntarily recalling 248,000 lbs (112,000 kg) of beef products in six states following an outbreak of illnesses involving E. coli bacteria.

U.S.  |  Health
In a recorded telephone message, National Steak and Poultry of Owasso, Oklahoma, said it was recalling various products in Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, South Dakota, Michigan, and Washington state.


http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2009/12/articles/food-poisoning-information/my-steak-has-been-needle-or-blade-penetrated-or-hammered-really-what-about-e-coli/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FoodPoisonBlog+%28Food+Poison+Blog%29

My steak has been needle or blade penetrated or hammered? Really What about E. coli?

With no labeling requirements at all regarding these tenderizing techniques in meats, charred might be safe, but rare definitely not for people or pets it seems
« Last Edit: December 26, 2009, 12:31:02 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2009, 12:23:41 PM »

http://www.marlerblog.com/2009/12/articles/case-news/there-is-a-long-too-long-history-of-e-coli-o157h7tainted-needle-tenderized-steaks/

There is a long, too long, history of E. coli O157:H7-tainted needle tenderized steaks



http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/2009/12/articles/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/marler-clark-calls-on-national-steak-and-poultry-and-the-fsis-to-reveal-what-restaurants-received-the-248000-pounds-of-e-colitainted-steaks/

Marler Clark Calls on National Steak and Poultry and the FSIS to Reveal What Restaurants Received the 248,000 Pounds of E. coli-Tainted Steaks
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JJ
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2009, 11:37:21 PM »

Now its not only ground beef that gets contaminated but the intact portions that are the steaks and roasts that are further 'tenderized' with needles that come in contact with e.coli meat? The poisoning just continues no matter who will get ill and quite possibly drop dead.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2009, 10:25:23 AM »

The problem is the E. coli occurring naturally in beef intestines, not in chickens, not in pork. Some way has to be found to prevent that
in the slaughter-retailing process from getting into the meat. A cow E. coli vaccine is being worked on. But nothing would help as much as cleaning up feed lots, slaughter process, and retailing treatment or else consumers like me will just decide to boycott beef altogether as
not worth the risk no matter how it's cooked.
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JJ
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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2009, 01:22:19 PM »

Too bad they can't process an animal with cutting off any place that is close to the intestines and just throwing it out or burning it or whatever. But then they would lose some type of profit on the part that gets cut out and not sold, wouldn't they. Better to keep on contaminating the rest of the animal in the processing procedure.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2009, 01:46:21 PM »

I believe feed lot filth (also in poo, I'm afraid) also spreads E. coli to other parts of slaughtered cattle. Sorry to be so gross. But
it has become a real threat to our families' health and safety and something has to be done. The cows aren't washed before slaughter
I don't believe. That's why there's such a focus on steps to take, like irradiate meat products. It's not a clean environment or clean conditions or clean equipment. There are real problems here that the government is not addressing for the benefit of consumer safety.

Safest cooking methods I'm told are 1. broiling (open flame) 2. grilling, and lastly 3. frying if you want to run the risk of eating beef at
all. Has to reach 160 degrees:
http://www.deh.enr.state.nc.us/ehs/Food/050812_SafeNonintactFacts.pdf
« Last Edit: December 27, 2009, 01:50:20 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
JJ
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2009, 01:53:39 PM »

Always will wonder if these steps that are 'not taken' are done in order to push for blasting food with radiation. I, for one, do not want food on my table that's radioactive or for my Foxy Lady to eat it either. 3cat agree that the current procedures of raising cattle on huge factory feed lots leads to contamination of the highest degree. Like you said a lot of people may just give up beef and not take the chance of e.coli killing them or their loved ones.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2009, 01:58:27 PM »

I don't know. Obviously lots of safe beef out there. But you can't see it, smell it, or necessarily taste it as a consumer (although some beef tastes pretty bad these days because of awful mixtures for economy). And I don't want my loved ones dying from the occasional accident either.
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catbird
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« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2009, 03:19:25 PM »

No, feedlot cattle are not washed before slaughter.  And in feed lots, they stand ankle- to knee-deep in manure a lot of the time, and are packed together rubbing it on each other.  One of the many reasons I don't eat beef, or any other meat for that matter.
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caylee
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« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2009, 03:27:22 PM »

Errr . . . seems a simple and inexpensive way to prevent some of the 'nastys' by simply washing the beef cattle before the process even begins. Why do they not do this Huh
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lesliek
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« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2009, 03:30:16 PM »

$ thats why. They are far more concerned with profit than safety !
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caylee
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« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2009, 03:41:34 PM »

Recalls are not cheap either, and they also need to factor in the loss of reputation. Do companies really think that the consumer is not going to stop buying their products if they are not safe to eat Huh
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lesliek
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« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2009, 09:46:36 PM »

Unfortunately a lot of people still don't check for recalls. And we all know how "well publicized" they are. Then they have lawyers on retainer who drag out any settlements & court cases for years.  A lot of them if not most have insurance to cover recall costs & lawsuits too. They wouldn't keep doing this if it cost more. Maybe if the fines were steeper they would think twice,but their lobbyists are hard at work preventing that too.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2009, 07:55:37 AM »

A lot of this meat apparently went to restaurants and the USDA is not announcing who because restaurants are not
retail outlets (huh? They're not?) Here's some info on some restaurant chains:

http://efoodalert.blogspot.com/2009/12/latest-beef-recall-leaves-restaurant.html
he recall notice, though, provides a few clues as to where some of the meat was shipped. While I can't be 100% certain, it appears to me that the following restaurants may have received a portion of the 248,000 pounds of recalled beef.

   1. Carino's Italian Restaurant is a national restaurant chain with one or more locations in five of the six states that have reported E. coli O157:H7 illnesses. The recall notice includes 8-ounce “CARINO’S BONELESS BEEF OUTSIDE SKIRT STEAK,” with an identifying case code of “130874.” and “CARINO’S BONELESS BEEF OUTSIDE SKIRT STEAK PIECES,” with an identifying case code of “13074.”
   2. 54th Street Grill and Bar, a regional restaurant chain owned by KRM Inc., with locations in Kansas, Missouri and Illinois. The recall notice includes three different sizes of "Boneless Beef Sirloin Steak" that are identified with the KRM initials.
   3. Moe's Southwest Grill, a national franchise chain with outlets in four of the six affected states. "Moe's Beef Steak" was among the recalled beef products.


These restaurants represent just a few of the many that purchased the recalled beef products. But that's not all.

National Steak and Poultry also sells its meat, by the case, directly to the public at its monthly dock sale. And its meat also can be purchased at military commissaries, if the comments on the Company's Testimonial web page are to be believed.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2009, 09:33:52 AM »

http://meatisneat.wordpress.com/2009/12/28/what-is-mechanical-tenderization/

What is mechanical tenderization?
2009 December 28
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