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Author Topic: (Melamine Suspected) Chinese Officials Say Baby Formula Tied to Kidney Stones  (Read 263964 times)
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Sandi K
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« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2008, 11:01:55 AM »

Well another thing Im not understanding and anyone can jump in and correct me, but if its true that its "only" melamine in this baby formula, what else is in it that would be causing the crystals to formulate?  Werent we told that melamine by itself wouldnt cause crystals?   Huh  Something isnt making sense here....
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catbird
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« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2008, 11:05:24 AM »

I thought of that too, Sandi.  So it seems that either 1)there is also cyanuric acid in the formula,  2)there are other ingredients that can cause the crystal/stones to form with melamine, in addition to CA, or  3)the whole thing about "melamine alone doesn't do anything" is not true.
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Carol
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« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2008, 11:06:11 AM »

where is David Barboza...is he with the New York Times??
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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

United we stand     Divided we fall....
Arlo
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« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2008, 11:08:40 AM »

I just got the auto-reply back from the NYT. 
"Your message will be evaluated and passed promptly to the appropriate editor. In some cases, we are able to follow up with individual replies, and we will certainly write or telephone if we need further information."
I wish I had a human being's e-mail there.
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YesBiscuit!
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« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2008, 11:10:05 AM »

I thought of that too, Sandi.  So it seems that either 1)there is also cyanuric acid in the formula,  2)there are other ingredients that can cause the crystal/stones to form with melamine, in addition to CA, or  3)the whole thing about "melamine alone doesn't do anything" is not true.

I agree with your 3 theories.  I just don't like the choices.   Undecided
Can't wait to hear what the FDA has to say...
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menusux
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« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2008, 11:11:33 AM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melamine#Chronic_toxicity

Melamine-Wikipedia

"Ingestion of melamine may lead to reproductive damage, or bladder or kidney stones, which can lead to bladder cancer.[14][19][20][21][22]

"A study in 1953 reported that dogs fed 3% melamine for a year had the following changes in their urine: (1) reduced specific gravity, (2) increased output, (3) melamine crystalluria, and (4) protein and occult blood.[23]

"Wilson Rumbeiha, an associate professor in MSU’s Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, commenting on results from a survey commissioned by the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians and designed and implemented by MSU toxicologists presented at the AAVLD's October 2007 meeting, said: "Unfortunately, these [melamine cyanurate] crystals don’t dissolve easily. They go away slowly, if at all, so there is the potential for chronic toxicitymelamine, also known as tripolycyanamide, and is recalling all the "baby milk powder" it manufactured before Aug. 6. Shanghai Daily says about 700 tons of the formula is still in circulation.

"Melamine is a byproduct of plastic manufacturing. It can be used to mimic high-protein additives such as wheat and rice gluten. The FDA is preparing a Health Information Advisory on the problem and expects to release it within the next five hours.

""A spokesperson for Sanlu said the company is investigating whether counterfeit formula was mislabeled," CBC reports."

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5h_0icROcE8vDvBdanXyvd0g600oQD934MUG80

Associated Press September 11, 2008

"Federal officials warned Thursday that tainted infant formula from China may be on sale at ethnic groceries in this country, even though it is not legally approved for importation.

"The Food and Drug Administration urged U.S. consumers to avoid all infant formula from China, after several brands sold in that country came under suspicion of being contaminated with melamine, a chemical used in plastics. Officials said there have been reports from China of babies developing serious kidney problems as a result.

""We're concerned that there may be some infant formula that may have gotten into the United States illegally and may be on the ethnic market," said Janice Oliver, deputy director of the FDA's food safety program. "No infant formula from China should be entering the United States, but in the past we have found it on at least one occasion."

"All U.S. brands of infant formula are safe, Oliver said. After hearing of the latest food safety scandal in China, the FDA checked with formula manufacturers here to determine if they were receiving any ingredients from that country. They were not.


""We want to assure the American public there is no threat of contamination to the domestic supply," said Oliver.

"There have been no reports of illnesses in the U.S., but officials are concerned that some Chinese formula may be on sale at ethnic groceries, particularly in places like New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Boston that have large populations of Chinese immigrants. The FDA is working with state officials to spread the word in immigrant communities.

"Melamine is the same chemical involved in a massive pet food recall last year. It is not supposed to be added to any food ingredients, but unscrupulous suppliers in China sometimes mix it in to make foodstuffs appear to be high in protein. Melamine is nitrogen rich, and standard tests for protein in bulk food ingredients measure levels of nitrogen."
« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 11:33:09 AM by menusux » Logged
Arlo
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« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2008, 11:29:53 AM »

I thought of that too, Sandi.  So it seems that either 1)there is also cyanuric acid in the formula,  2)there are other ingredients that can cause the crystal/stones to form with melamine, in addition to CA, or  3)the whole thing about "melamine alone doesn't do anything" is not true.

I agree with your 3 theories.  I just don't like the choices.   Undecided
Can't wait to hear what the FDA has to say...

I heard back from the Reuters auto-responder.  I phoned the links into USAToday.  I've had better luck with them on the phone, than through e-mail.  And they were really good about the pet food recall.
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YesBiscuit!
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« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2008, 11:30:31 AM »

Another possibility:  no "dilution factor" for the babies may have resulted in more serious side effects from consuming the melamine.  Infants don't eat/drink anything but formula so whatever was the ratio of melamine to other ingredients in the formula - that's ALL they were getting.  And considering that baby formula is kinda like protein powder for infants, the amount of melamine may have been very high.
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menusux
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« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2008, 11:54:43 AM »

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2008-09/10/content_7014863.htm

China Daily September 10, 2008

"A hospital has received 14 kidney stone patients in the past two months, all were infants below 11 months, and the milk powder they drank was of the same brand, said a doctor with the hospital in Lanzhou, capital of northwest China's Gansu Province Wednesday.

"These infants shared the symptoms of being unable to pass urine, accompanied by vomiting, Zhang Wei, chief urology doctor of the No.1 Hospital of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) said.

""it was rare for babies to get kidney stones, let alone so many babies at the same time," said Zhang, a doctor with 22 years experience in urology, who received the first case on June 28.

"The infants, all from the remote countryside, drank the same brand of milk powder, much cheaper than the one on the market, said their parents.

"The provincial Public Health Bureau told Xinhua that it had investigated, but didn't give specific figure of how many infants were involved."

So we see that these children were under a year old and probably had been drinking the tainted milk powder for a matter of months.  We also see that the particular brand of formula was considered to be least expensive compared to other available brands.  This sounds SO dreadfully familiar.
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Carol
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« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2008, 12:06:23 PM »

I emailed my local news (among too many to count others) just in case they won't cover it---I stressed how this may be in some Asiam markets in the city....I hope this gets picked up by the news tonight! Angry
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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

United we stand     Divided we fall....
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2008, 12:25:26 PM »

http://www.cbc.ca/consumer/story/2008/09/11/baby-powder-china.html

Tainted Chinese baby formula may be on sale in U.S., FDA says
Last Updated: Thursday, September 11, 2008 | 3:10 PM ET Comments5Recommend11CBC News
Chinese baby formula contaminated with melamine may be for sale in ethnic grocery stores in the U.S., officials with the Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

All U.S. brands of formula are safe, the FDA said, and no Chinese brands are approved for export to the U.S.

But it's possible that ethnic grocers may be selling formula from China, particularly in cities with large populations of Chinese immigrants.


« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 12:28:14 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
catwoods
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« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2008, 12:29:24 PM »

What a sad, terrible thing. Cry
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JustMe
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« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2008, 12:36:15 PM »


All U.S. brands of formula are safe, the FDA said, and no Chinese brands are approved for export to the U.S.

Somehow, I'm not getting a warm and fuzzy feeling.   Sad
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Carol
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« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2008, 12:38:29 PM »


All U.S. brands of formula are safe, the FDA said, and no Chinese brands are approved for export to the U.S.

Somehow, I'm not getting a warm and fuzzy feeling.   Sad

Me neither, but how would these show up in the US in the ethnic grocery store then??   Huh
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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

United we stand     Divided we fall....
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2008, 12:40:58 PM »

Something about a gray market. Imports not inspected and mislabeled? A technique used before.
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