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Author Topic: CLASS I RECALL HEALTH RISK: HIGH, Lebanon Bologna Products Due to Possible E. co  (Read 1513 times)
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« on: March 26, 2011, 02:31:41 AM »

Pennsylvania Firm Recalls Lebanon Bologna Products Due to Possible E. coli O157:H7 Contamination

USDA Recall Classifications
Class I    This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

Class II    This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.

Class III    This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

WASHINGTON, March 22, 2011 - Palmyra Bologna Company, Inc., a Palmyra, Penn., establishment, is recalling approximately 23,000 pounds of Lebanon bologna products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. Lebanon bologna is a fermented, semi-dry sausage. This beef product has an appearance similar to salami.

The products subject to recall in packaging for consumers include: [View Sample Labels]

    * 6-ounce packages of "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot code "01351" and best-by date of "Apr. 20 2011" printed on the package.
    * 12-ounce packages of "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot code "01351" and best-by dates of "Apr. 20 2011" or "Apr. 21 2011" printed on the package.
    * 16-ounce packages of "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot code "01351" and best-by date of "Apr. 22 2011" printed on the package.


Each package bears a label with establishment number "EST. 474" inside the USDA mark of inspection, in addition to lot code "01351" and the best-by date as noted above. The products subject to recall were produced in December 2010 and were sent to distribution centers in Calif., Colo., Md., N.Y. and Pa. for further distribution to retail stores.

The products subject to recall in packaging for retailers include:

    * Whole chub packages of "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot codes "01351" or "06337" and best-by date of "Feb. 14 2011," "Feb. 15 2011," "Feb. 16 2011," or "Feb. 28 2011" printed on the package.
    * Half chub packages of "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot codes "01351" or "06337" and best-by date of "Apr. 6 2011," "Apr. 7 2011," "Apr. 16 2011," or "Apr. 19 2011," printed on the package.
    * 12-pound bulk boxes of sliced "SELTZER'S BEEF LEBANON BOLOGNA" with lot code "01351" and best-by date of "Apr. 21 2011" printed on the package.


Each package bears a label with establishment number "EST. 474" inside the USDA mark of inspection, in addition to either lot code "06337" or "01351." They were sold to retailers and may have been further sliced and repackaged at retail. The products subject to recall were produced in December 2010 and were sent to distribution centers in Calif., Colo., Md., N.Y. and Pa. for further distribution to retail stores.

When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on FSIS' website at www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/ Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp.

FSIS was notified of an investigation of E. coli O157:H7 illnesses on March 10, 2011. Working in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state public health partners, 4 case-patients in N.J., N.C., and Pa. have been identified with illness onset dates between Jan. 28, 2011 and Feb. 12, 2011. As a result of the epidemiologic investigation, FSIS determined that there is a link between the Lebanon bologna products and the illnesses in these states. FSIS is continuing to work with the CDC, affected state public health partners, and the company on the investigation. Anyone with signs or symptoms of foodborne illness should contact a health care provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness.

Media with questions about the recall should contact Rebecca Kleha at (717) 232-5554, ext. 164. Consumers with questions regarding the recall should contact the company at 1-800-282-6336.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.
#
Retail Distribution List (PDF)
Ask Karen

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_025_2011_Release/index.asp


Investigation Announcement: Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections Associated with Lebanon Bologna

March 23, 2011
Infections with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 by statestate map

Click to view a larger image.
Infections with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 by known or estimated illness onset dateepi curve

Click to view a larger image.
Introduction

CDC is collaborating with public health officials in many states and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA/FSIS) to investigate a multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. Investigators are using DNA analysis of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria obtained through diagnostic testing to identify cases of illness that may be part of this outbreak.

As of March 22, 2011, 14 persons infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli serotype O157:H7 have been reported from Maryland (3 cases), New Jersey (2 cases), North Carolina (1 case), Ohio (2 cases) and Pennsylvania (6 cases). Reported dates of illness onset range from January 10, 2011 to February 15, 2011. Ill persons range in age from 1 to 70 years, with a median age of 13.5 years. Seventy-nine percent are male. Among 13 ill persons for whom information is known, 3 or 23%, reported being hospitalized, and none have reported hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure that is associated with E. coli O157:H7 infections. No deaths have been reported.

The outbreak can be visually described with a chart showing the number of people who became ill each day. This chart is called an epidemic curve or epi curve. Illnesses that occurred after March 2, 2011, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 3 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting of E. coli Cases for more details.
Investigation of the Outbreak

Collaborative investigative efforts of local, state, federal public health and regulatory agencies have associated this outbreak with eating Lebanon bologna. Lebanon bologna is a fermented, semi-dry sausage. This beef product has an appearance similar to salami. In an epidemiologic study conducted during March 15-18, a total of 13 ill persons answered questions about foods consumed during the days before becoming ill, and investigators compared their responses to those of 21 persons of similar age previously reported to state health departments with other illnesses ("controls"). Ill persons (69%) were significantly more likely than controls (0%) to report eating Lebanon bologna. Additionally, four ill persons have been identified who purchased Seltzer Brand Lebanon bologna at four different grocery store locations in three states before becoming ill.
Recall Information

Palmyra Bologna Company, of Palmyra, PA, is recalling approximately 23,000 pounds of Lebanon bologna products that may be contaminated with E. coli 0157:H7. Consumers are advised to review the USDA's FSIS Recall Press Release for a list of recalled products and images of the product.
Clinical Features/Signs and Symptoms

Most people infected with E. coli O157:H7 develop diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after swallowing the organism, but some illnesses last longer and are more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by stool sample culture. While most people recover within a week, some develop a severe infection. A type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) can begin as the diarrhea is improving; this condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old and the elderly. Signs and symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue and irritability, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, decreased urination and swelling of the face, hands, feet, or entire body. Persons who experience these symptoms and believe they are at risk for HUS should seek emergency medical care immediately.
Advice to Consumers, Retailers, and Others

Consumers should not eat any of the recalled products, and restaurants and food service operators should not serve them. Consumers, retailers, and others who have any of the recalled products should dispose of them in a closed plastic bag placed in a sealed trash can. This will prevent people or animals from eating them.
CDC's Role in Food Safety

CDC leads federal efforts to gather data on foodborne illnesses, investigate foodborne illnesses and outbreaks, and monitor the effectiveness of prevention and control efforts. CDC is not a food safety regulatory agency but works closely with the food safety regulatory agencies, in particular, with FDA and FSIS.  CDC also plays a key role in building state and local health department epidemiology, laboratory, and environmental health capacity to support foodborne disease surveillance and outbreak response. Notably, CDC data can be used to help document the effectiveness of regulatory interventions.
Additional Resources

    * E. coli O157:H7 Frequently Asked Questions
    * E. coli Resources for Clinicians
    * FoodSafety.gov
    * Description of the Steps In a Foodborne Outbreak Investigation

CDC's Role in Food Safety

CDC leads federal efforts to gather data on foodborne illnesses, investigate foodborne illnesses and outbreaks, and monitor the effectiveness of prevention and control efforts. CDC is not a food safety regulatory agency but works closely with the food safety regulatory agencies, in particular, with FDA and USDA/FSIS. CDC also plays a key role in building state and local health department epidemiology, laboratory, and environmental health capacity to support foodborne disease surveillance and outbreak response. Notably, CDC data can be used to help document the effectiveness of regulatory interventions.

 

Page last modified: March 23, 2011
Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)
Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases (DFWED)
Navigation for the CDC E. coli Website
 

http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2011/O157_0311/index.html



 
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