Itchmo Forums for Cats & Dogs Brought to you by Itchmo: Essential news, humor and info for cats, dogs and pet owners.
May 25, 2020, 12:59:03 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Go To Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.


Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Raw Diets (Not Commercially Prepared)  (Read 10107 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« on: August 02, 2007, 03:52:17 AM »

This topic is only for members currently feeding raw diets that are NOT commercially prepared or who are interested in such diets in the future and have questions and/or need help/encouragement.  No criticism will be allowed.  Posts will be deleted without warning if rules are not followed regarding criticism.  However, you can have a free-flowing conversation in this thread as it is not structured like the brand name threads are.  Enjoy.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2007, 04:27:06 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
kaffe
Guest
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2007, 09:22:27 PM »

Portland, Oregon.  My cats' diet consists of home-prepared raw food occassionally supplemented with commerical raw or commercial canned or commercial cat kibble (just to give the kitties variety).  The commercial part of the diet make up no more than 10% of my cats' weekly food intake.   Both cats are doing very very well on this diet.  I use the raw cat food recipe from CatNutrition.org with a couple of variations.  For example, I add 1 cup of lightly cooked mixed vegetables in every batch of raw food I make to give the cats extra fiber and prevent constipation. I also add a multi-enzyme tablet to the daily raw ration to help digestion. 
« Last Edit: August 02, 2007, 09:28:15 PM by kaffe » Logged
Cato
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1322


« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2009, 12:50:01 AM »

Update:  Cato is on 85% raw and 15% kibble ( his snacky at night so he doesn't wake me up).  But I noticed that the 1/4 cup I leave in the bowl for him to snak on is always only half eaten.  So maybe it is more like 90% raw and 10% kibble.  He looks and seems to feel great on this diet.  Thick, long, silky, wondrous-smelling coat; bright eyes; tons of energy; no fleas; bright, alert eyes; no-smelly poopies and excellent disposition.  He is maintaining weight - a whopping 14 pounds now and may still have some growing to do.  And he won't eat any commercial canned anymore, nor - sigh - any cooked recipe I make him taste-test.  He just wants raw food - as fresh as I could make it.

Despite all the dire warnings of salmonella, e-coli, neither Cato nor Kaffe ever had problems like that since I began raw feeding in 2007. 

Logged
sharky
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431


« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2009, 07:53:50 AM »

Update:  Cato is on 85% raw and 15% kibble ( his snacky at night so he doesn't wake me up).  But I noticed that the 1/4 cup I leave in the bowl for him to snak on is always only half eaten.  So maybe it is more like 90% raw and 10% kibble.  He looks and seems to feel great on this diet.  Thick, long, silky, wondrous-smelling coat; bright eyes; tons of energy; no fleas; bright, alert eyes; no-smelly poopies and excellent disposition.  He is maintaining weight - a whopping 14 pounds now and may still have some growing to do.  And he won't eat any commercial canned anymore, nor - sigh - any cooked recipe I make him taste-test.  He just wants raw food - as fresh as I could make it.

Despite all the dire warnings of salmonella, e-coli, neither Cato nor Kaffe ever had problems like that since I began raw feeding in 2007. 



My holistic / conventional raw advocating vet HAS YET to have issue with the possible bacterial issues.. Neither did I even feeding raw / homemade to chronic issue "kids" nor did I with a impaired immune system get any  ... but several vets in the area have seen some bacterial issues in raw feed cat s
Logged
Auntie Crazy
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 220



WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2009, 08:46:35 AM »

What bacterial issues, Sharky?
Logged

AC & Crew: Allen, Rachel, Meghan, Spencer, Heather & Ralph

CatCentric.org
: Raw feeding, feline nutrition & related health blog, article and resource site.
sharky
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431


« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2009, 09:44:17 AM »

e coli and salmonella ... some have lost the cats Cry Cry ... It is bad enough that they ask on their entry forms if the animal is raw feed ... But my vet likely has several hundred on partly raw has yet to see it ...
« Last Edit: September 27, 2009, 09:45:58 AM by sharky » Logged
petslave
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5178


« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2009, 10:04:08 AM »

I haven't had any problems with home-fed raw for my dogs, but I did have an issue with one popular commercial raw food.  I bought their organic chicken line to try on the cats, and all the cats that ate it got terrible diarrhea.  I had just finished several packs of their non-organic food with them, exact same formula, so I didn't see how it could be a food switch problem. 

I fed it to my little dog, still not believing it was a sanitation problem, and he ended up with bad diarrhea too.  So I'm totally convinced that batch was contaminated with bacteria.  I don't trust raw commercial anymore.  Who knows how many times it's been handled or sat around under warmer conditions.

Cato, is the raw diet recipe you're using posted in the threads here?  Are you grinding meats or just feeding chopped raw meat with supplements added?  I'd like to start feeding some raw to my cats that will eat it.  I don't have money or kitchen space to get into the grinding thing though.
Logged
sharky
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431


« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2009, 10:11:33 AM »

It is  well known Organic ( ie the certified) meats have MORE bacteria present than non organics...

I often worried with the premade as to freeze thaw cycles ... thanks for the how many handle it
Logged
Auntie Crazy
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 220



WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2009, 11:39:02 AM »

e coli and salmonella ... some have lost the cats Cry Cry ... ..

Could you be more specific? Who has lost how many cats? What were they feeding and what methodology were they using? Where did they get the food and how did they store it? What tests were done to prove it was either e coli and/or salmonella that killed these cats? Who were the vets involved? Pm me with the vet info if you don't want it public - I would very much like to talk with him/her to learn how to prevent a similar "issue" with my furchildren.

Cats digestive systems evolved to handle the bacterial contaminants in the prey they eat. I'd really have to have more info on these claims before I gave them any credence at all.

You and I have had similar discussions before, Jen. It's frustrating when you post statements like this, but don't provide any actual details. It unnecessarily scares people who are already wary and just want to do the best they can for their cats. If you're truly trying to be helpful, then post the whole story so everyone else knows what NOT to do.
Logged

AC & Crew: Allen, Rachel, Meghan, Spencer, Heather & Ralph

CatCentric.org
: Raw feeding, feline nutrition & related health blog, article and resource site.
petslave
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5178


« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2009, 01:00:00 PM »

Personal experience here that might account for some of these reports.  When my cat Mickey went into his decline from what ultimately turned out to be (turned into?) intestinal cancer, we were working on IBD issues with him.  Many people suggest a raw diet for IBD, and a number of cats improve on it.  But for some cats, it can create bigger problems. 

I tried it on Mickey when he first started having trouble, and his diarrhea went from bad to terrible.  Again, the first pack I went through seemed to work OK for him, though he didn't improve on it.  But the second put him in bad shape.  Unlike the brand in my other post, this is a locally made, very good quality raw commercial food with limited distribution.  And the one I used was very basic - ground turkey, bones and liver.  So if a cat is already ill and having digestive issues, raw may do wonders or it may be a major problem.  This may not have anything to do with the food, but with the cat's health issue at the time.  With IBD the intestines can get extremely permeable and let microbes go directly into the system.

I think we have to be careful at touting raw as the cure-all for illness and go carefully into it.  Especially with intestinal problems or compromised immune systems. 
Logged
lesliek
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 11143


Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2009, 04:42:17 PM »

Tried raw pork today for their lunch & it was a big hit ! 5 out of 5 paws up. I didn't add anything,it was straight pieces of raw pork. The cats didn't want their cooked dinner,they were looking for more pork . The dogs as always eat anything.
Logged

"the world's most inept extortionist"
Auntie Crazy
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 220



WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2009, 05:18:37 PM »

Ah, I think a clarification / distinction is in order.

Commercial raw is NOT all raw; it's full of stuff just like other commercially produced cat foods and has been processed just like they have. This thread is for non-commercially prepared raw and any statements I, personally, make always refer to fresh raw foods.

Because of the additives (check the ingredients) and the extra processing, I'm not the slightest bit surprised that a commercially-processed raw food caused more problems than it solved. I'm so sorry you had to go through that, Petslave! When I put my my four pound Yorkie on NV raw, she gained an ENTIRE pound, lost fur and grew patches of raw, scaly skin. All symptoms disappeared when I stopped feeding her the NV. Without a doubt, Jasmine was allergic to something added to the raw meat in the NV.

Fresh raw, now, is world's away from commercial raw. I would be willing to bet that a fresh raw diet wouldn't cause you the same problems, Petslave.

That said, of course, no diet can cure all things. Grin  
« Last Edit: September 27, 2009, 06:19:40 PM by Auntie Crazy » Logged

AC & Crew: Allen, Rachel, Meghan, Spencer, Heather & Ralph

CatCentric.org
: Raw feeding, feline nutrition & related health blog, article and resource site.
mainecoonpeg
Guest
« Reply #12 on: September 27, 2009, 05:23:30 PM »

Are you folks who are feeding non-commercial raw, purchasing your meats as organic or free range or both?

Thanks in advance.
Logged
sharky
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 431


« Reply #13 on: September 27, 2009, 05:26:25 PM »

Are you folks who are feeding non-commercial raw, purchasing your meats as organic or free range or both?

Thanks in advance.

I use what is typically called free range .. ie not hormones, antibiotics and are humanely treated
Logged
Auntie Crazy
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 220



WWW
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2009, 06:18:31 PM »

I buy meats and organs that are not enhanced (marinades, etc), but I do not specifically seek out either organic or free-range products.
Logged

AC & Crew: Allen, Rachel, Meghan, Spencer, Heather & Ralph

CatCentric.org
: Raw feeding, feline nutrition & related health blog, article and resource site.
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Copyright 2007 Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines | Sitemap