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Author Topic: Nestle opens petfood plant in Russia  (Read 2842 times)
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aboutdogs
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« on: September 29, 2007, 06:18:54 AM »

Note: Nestle (Swiss Owned) manufacturers Purina Animal Foods as well as now owns our last baby food company, Gerber. How the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) allowed this sale is beyond me. I wrote in protest when I read notice Nestle was buying Gerber. Nestle also owns 5 new plants in Pakistan. Their own site touts these milk production plants and their aim to monopolize milk products. An example of this kind of product is Nestle's Good Start Baby Formula.

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Source: LegalView.com and PR-Inside.com

http://www.pr-inside.com/legalview-com-responds-to-national-pet-r111079.htm

Home > Nutrition News > News

Nestle opens petfood plant in Russia
Production is slated to start this autumn with an annual target of 40,000 tons
Release Date: Monday, September 10, 2007
Taking advantage of Russia's growing petfood market, Nestle Purina has opened a petfood plant in Russia's Kaluga region, south of Moscow. The exact number of pets in Russia is not known, but it is estimated at about 35 million. One in three Russians have a cat, while Russia's household dog population is the highest in Europe. Russia's petfood market is worth about US$1 billion, according to Euromonitor International.

The dry dog food plant in Kaluga will be run by a Russian branch of its subsidiary Nestle Purina PetCare. Production is slated to start this autumn with an annual target of 40,000 tons. Nestle has made a US$30 million investment in the project, hoping to capitalize on the rapid growth of Russia's petfood market. "The Russian market is not very fragmented. We have one main competitor - Mars. They arrived a bit earlier on the market. We are moving quite fast in our growth. We are moving faster than the market," says Yana Mikailova, director of Nestle Purina PetCare Russia.


Updated: Sep 12, 2007
History: Action filed to compel FDA investigation into petfood poisonings > Nutrition News > September 2007 > Nestle opens petfood plant in Russia
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About Dogs
JJ
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2007, 06:52:05 PM »

Is this food only to be sold in Russia? Will any food imported to the US say made in Russia? I do not buy any products of theirs (nestle's) so hope the rest of people who do reads the labels and thinks about it first.
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MarkH
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2007, 02:50:34 PM »

Is this food only to be sold in Russia? Will any food imported to the US say made in Russia? I do not buy any products of theirs (nestle's) so hope the rest of people who do reads the labels and thinks about it first.

Oh come on, you know you have bought Nestle candy bars and chocolate in the past. Who can resist chocolate? Smiley
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Donna
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It's PEACE, not war & greed, earthlings!


« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2007, 05:57:30 AM »

Oh come on, you know you have bought Nestle candy bars and chocolate in the past. Who can resist chocolate?

Just adding a little food for thought here before that next bite of chocolate, which you might choose to resist, because I have to ask, how does that calf rennet taste?

Calf rennet is part and parcel of the manufacturing process and is obtained through the slaughter of milk fed, new born or young calves.  Rennet is found within the mucosa of the fourth stomach lining and is used in whey production, an ingredient of chocolate.  So, the next time one would like to take a bite of that chocolate bar, chocolate covered ice cream or even pop several of those lovable, little multi-colored candies into one's mouth, perhaps just knowing calves are slaughtered for this reason will be somewhat of a deterrent.

As I am not a big chocolate eater, but discuss issues such as this, chocolate just happened to be a topic of discussion between Leslie and myself only a few days ago.  Leslie, bless her soul, found out Ghiradelli (San Francisco) manufactures a rennet free chocolate.  So, if one must eat chocolate (and I have chocoholics in my family, too), perhaps Ghiradelli's will be the product of choice.

Sincerely,
Donna

modify=spelling error

~ The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them ~
    Lois McMaster Bujold, 2002 Diplomatic Immunity, US Science Fiction Author

« Last Edit: October 05, 2007, 06:00:13 AM by Donna » Logged

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JJ
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2007, 10:22:53 PM »

Donna thanks for the mention of rennet free chocolate. I found organic candy bars that are rennet free. Baby cow is why I do not eat veal either.
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