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Author Topic: Marion Nestle's next book I won't be buying: Feed Your Pet Right  (Read 5074 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: December 26, 2009, 08:06:38 AM »

http://www.foodpolitics.com/2009/12/eating-liberally-are-pets-responsible-for-climate-change/

We think pet food performs a huge public service. If pets didn’t eat all that stuff, we would have to find a means of getting rid of it: landfills, burning, fertilizer, or converting it to fuel, all of which have serious environmental consequences. If dogs and cats ate the same food we do, we estimate that just on the basis of calories, the 172 million dogs and cats in American would consume as much food as 42 million people.
Food Politics blog, Dec. 22, 2009 Marion Nestle

There's no statement about pets' health here existing on a diet of garbage plus chemical additives plus bad grains plus extruded crap.
imho in nature pets would not exclusively be dining on waste products plus dangerous additives.

So I won't be buying:
My book about pet food with Malden Nesheim, Feed Your Pet Right, has just progressed past its second set of page-proof corrections and is slowly making its way to publication on May 11 I don't think this is my favorite pet food "expert."
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mainecoonpeg
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2009, 01:32:18 PM »

I'm right there with you 3cat.

I heard Marion Nestle being interviewed on a radio talk show and I thought I was listening to her evil/ignorant clone.

Sometimes it makes me wonder who bought them and helped them alter their way of thinking Huh

Just my paranoid pet parent opinion here.
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JJ
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2009, 10:39:16 PM »

Nice to know what this person really thinks animals are for - garbage dumps! If this stuff has such serious environmental concerns - duoh - why in he--ll--o is it ok to process it in plants and feed it to innocent animals? Is it more dangerous than the petroleum products that make up gasoline now?
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lesliek
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2009, 07:05:00 AM »

Disappointing to see her relax her opinion on commercial petfood.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2010, 10:56:51 AM »

http://www.foodpolitics.com/2010/05/feed-your-pet-right-out-at-last/

Book hits store shelves May 11, 2010. Anyone who does buy it and read it, please post your review.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2010, 06:15:10 AM »

New York Times review of Feed Your Pet Right:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/01/health/01brod.html?ref=health
Personal Health
The Truth About Cat and Dog Food
By JANE E. BRODY
Published: May 31, 2010

...In seeking evidence for the added value to health and longevity of commercial pet foods, the authors found almost none with any validity.
No agency requires proof of pet food health claims, and no pet food company is willing to invest in decades of research to determine whether its products keep animals healthier and extend their lives, the authors state. Pet food companies say they do research, but it is rarely done in a scientific fashion, with comparable control and experimental groups. There is, however, ample evidence that, despite claims to the contrary, both dogs and cats “are perfectly able to digest grains if they are cooked,” Dr. Nestle said.

... “Besides, the pet food industry serves an important ecological function by using up food that would otherwise be thrown out,” Dr. Nestle said. “If everyone cooked human food for the 472 million cats and dogs in America, it would be like feeding an additional 42 million people.”
« Last Edit: June 02, 2010, 06:17:02 AM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2010, 07:02:44 AM »

Some interesting related comments here:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/31/feeding-fido-and-fluffy/
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babysweet
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2010, 11:33:21 AM »

I wanted to like this book.  I wanted to LOVE this book.  But after participating in an online chat with Ms. Nestle herself, and watching her tell someone that as long as the food said "AAFCO approved" on the side, it was totally fine.  I flipped, broke all the chat rules and started peppering her with questions about artificial colours, flavours, preservatives, etc.  She stuck to her guns.

The worst part is that I LOVED her last book, Chihuahua in the Coal Mine.  It is THE definitive source of information about the mela-recall.  Information I was not aware of (and most of us on here are pretty well connected to the pulse of the pet owning public and any ongoing issues) nor have I seen reprinted again.  I suggest that EVERYONE read this book.

And then there's that other issue... she's being backed by some pretty big players in the online pet world.  For example, PetConnection.com (whose owner feeds natural home made food) has gotten behind her in a big way, printing several articles about her and with her, and pointing out those articles promoting Ms. Nestle on other sites as well.

I'm ordering the book today.  It should be here by the end of the week at the latest. 
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2010, 12:04:57 PM »

I'll be anxious to see what you think, babysweet.

But I absolutely don't care what authorities are backing this lady's opinions. I've lived long enough to suspect anyone can be purchased for just about any purpose in court or as an expert on almost
any subject. And that goes for the pet connection folks, too. They have acquired some sponsors
these days I don't totally trust. Of course, that doesn't mean they're never right.

In human nutrition, various processed ingredients are questioned at best and condemned as
illness-causing and worse at worst. So what I wonder makes Ms. Nestle think the AAFCO seal of
approval makes an ingredient okay? That's a question I can't get over. All pet foods are not created
equal, just as all human food products are not. The AAFCO folks are raising cows for slaughter in
18 months or less, and almost every other food animal is slaughtered in less time. These are experts in keeping a companion animal alive for 20 years when admittedly there's no backup scientific studies? As far as I can tell, veterinarians barely know what a dog can eat, let alone a cat, and most of all let alone AAFCO regulation setters.

Please let me know if you see anything that supports the proposition that this lady is
correct that a lifelong diet of exclusive human waste food with chemical additives of unknown safety and extruded as dry food pellets to boot is the absolute best diet for our pets. Me I'm not buying it at this time personally, nor am I buying this what I see as falsely premised book, mostly meaning the AAFCO knows what the heck it is doing with regards to companion animals and has any concern but maximizing pet food profits. But I'm sure willing to listen to people with companion animal health in mind first.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2010, 12:11:11 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
catbird
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2010, 02:07:35 PM »

I am pretty tempted to post on the NY Times blog article, with a few links to here.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2010, 04:17:48 PM »

I just can't imagine store house brands meeting many standards and being adequate foods, along with a lot of brand name pet foods. But since no one studies pet foods long term, who could possibly
know? And if the lack of labelling standards says anything, there probably wouldn't be the same
ingredients in any pet food for ten or twenty years anyway that one could study.

I know I have a big chip on my shoulder losing three pets to commercial pet food and I don't believe
pet food companies have companion animal welfare at heart over the huge profits they're making. So
that's my bias. And I don't believe I made any secret of it or the fact I don't have a needed animal
nutrition background. But oh, how I detest people selling out and leading other pet food consumers
down a primrose path. I hope Ms. Nestle isn't doing that.
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TBOBINA
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« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2010, 12:17:47 PM »

AAFCO stamp of approval  Roll Eyes what a joke, it means nothing!!!
Wont be buying this book.
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babysweet
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2010, 02:00:02 PM »

Should be arriving tomorrow morning.  I'll post as soon as I've read the book in its entirety.

I have to say it again though - her first book on pet food is a MUST READ for EVERY pet owner.  She actually gets down to the truth and creates a timeline for the meladisaster.  It's a great read.  I followed the recall word for word, and still learned a ton from this book.  It's called Pet Food Politics; The Chihuahua In The Coal Mine.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2010, 04:41:07 PM »

Thanks, babysweet. I really am anxious to hear what you think or any other consumers who read it think. Just don't want to be supporting Ms. Nestle based on her December 2009 blog until some pet owners speak.
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babysweet
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« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2010, 11:07:45 AM »

When I first heard that this book was coming down the pipeline, I couldn't wait.  Marion's last book "Pet Food Politics" gets a 5/5 from me, hands down.  THE definitive source for information about the 2007 meladisaster.

After participating in an online Q&A and reading a few interviews and blog posts, I was prepared to hate the book - I know many others already do.

I'm only 1/3 of the way through it, and I have made several (dozens and dozens) notations.

Unfortunately, they're not all equal.  Some of my notations are to point out what I believe to be false facts.  For example, right off the bat Nestle uses physiology to determine that the dog is an omnivore, while the wolf and cat are carnivores.  They claim that the human's digestive tract and canine DT are similar enough to declare them both omnivores.  I believe their facts to be incorrect, and I also have an issue with the fact that only the DT is taken into consideration.  The fact that the dog does not have amylase in its saliva and has the teeth of a true carnivore is completely ignored.

Other notations are of details I wasn't aware of, and they require follow up.  For example, judging by the information provided, pica could be caused by a B12 deficiency.  The authors never say this outright, but rather mention in passing that it's a lack of B12 that causes other animals to eat their feces (ie rabbits).  It's certainly something to try, as B12 supplements are cheap, safe and easy to administer.

I wish I could give a recommendation one way or the other, but at this point (again, only 1/3 of the way in) I have to recommend that anyone who has taken the time to educate themselves about the industry to the point that they know fact checking is a necessity regardless of the source - you should buy this book.

There is a wealth of data contained within its pages that anyone who seriously follows the industry should have this book on their shelves.  It's interesting that Marion and Malden come to different conclusions than I do with access to the same data, time and time again.  I believe several of their conclusions to be faulty, but the raw data is extremely valuable as a reference.

So, to tie everything up - itchmo regulars, I think this book is definitely worth the price of purchase.  However, there are about a dozen books I would recommend to average Jane/Joe pet owner before this one. 

It's very similar to when I'm asked about Ann Martin's second book and I have to say that most of it is worth reading but skip the chapter on raw which is so full of holes I don't know how it got published. 

Wish I had a more definitive review.  I'm giving it 3/5 in recognition of the data collection that went into its production.

Anyone else?  I'm curious what others think.
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