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Author Topic: H1N1 cases in cats and other pets  (Read 22309 times)
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menusux
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« Reply #45 on: December 04, 2009, 01:20:50 PM »

http://www.news.colostate.edu/Release/4934

Colorado State University December 4, 2009

FORT COLLINS - "Two cats from different households in Colorado have tested positive for H1N1, according to Colorado State University’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. The felines are expected to recover, but their cases serve as a reminder to pet owners to seek veterinary attention for companion animals that appear to be ill.

"The cats in these two cases were diagnosed with lower respiratory tract infections by Colorado veterinarians. Both cats are currently ill and have been ill for multiple weeks, with one illness beginning on Oct. 2 and the other beginning in early November. Antibiotics do not treat H1N1, but both cats received antibiotics as a precaution against secondary bacterial infections. Neither cat had symptoms that responded to antibiotics.

“"We expect that both cats will recover, but these cases serve as a reminder to pet owners to seek veterinary attention as soon as possible if their pet seems ill. This flu has also been identified in ferrets, exotic cats and birds in the United States, so any companion animal that appears to have the flu should get immediate attention,” said Kristy Pabilonia, a veterinarian and expert on H1N1 testing in animals at CSU. “We are very interested in understanding more about H1N1 in cats and other pets and providing tests to veterinarians who suspect H1N1 in companion animals.”


"Swabs from the cats’ mouth and nose were tested by CSU and additional blood serum confirmation testing from Iowa State University confirmed that they have the pandemic H1N1 strain.

"Veterinarians believe that both of the cats became ill with H1N1 after a person in their household contracted the virus.

"In addition to receiving veterinary care, cats and ferrets with H1N1 should be made comfortable and get plenty of rest, enticing food and fluids.

"The USDA is reporting three other confirmed cases of H1N1 in cats, one each in Oregon, Iowa and Pennsylvania. At least five ferrets have been confirmed to have H1N1, four in Oregon and one in Nebraska.

"Pabilonia said that because this strain of H1N1 is new, information about how it impacts animals is limited. It is possible that any animal may be susceptible to H1N1, but no other cases have been documented in companion animals. To date, there are no reported cases of H1N1 in dogs in the United States. Pet birds have been susceptible to other strains of the flu, but no cases of H1N1 in these animals have been reported.

"People with H1N1 or any flu should be careful when in contact with their pets. Pabilonia recommends that they practice social distancing with pets just as they would with people. People who are ill should wash their hands before handling pets and, if possible, have someone who is well feed and care for pets. Just like people, pets are exposed to H1N1 through aerosols -- fluids released when someone sneezes, coughs or touches their face and then a surface.

"Because there have only been a few cases of H1N1 flu in pets, veterinarians have limited information about the symptoms. Pets with H1N1 may behave as if they aren’t feeling well, acting lethargic and may appear to have a respiratory illness. If a pet seems ill, it should be taken to a veterinarian for an exam as soon as possible and the veterinarian should be alerted that the pet has been exposed to someone with influenza.

"CSU’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory is testing pets for H1N1 as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Animal Health Laboratory Network. The test detects H1N1 influenza virus in animals. Tests are performed on nasal or mouth swabs. Swabs should be obtained by a veterinarian and submitted to the lab for results."
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BW
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« Reply #46 on: December 05, 2009, 09:19:46 AM »

Oh my Menusux, that is indeed of concern. I was just sick for over a month, and Esther Elizabeth sleeps with me.  I don't know how I could sequester myself with so many cats to care for, there is no one else do do it.
We do have H1n1 in our town, a couple children were diagnosed with it in my son's step daughter's school.  I don't know what I had, don't go to the doctor.  None of my cats got sick, thankfully.

 
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wicked fate
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« Reply #47 on: December 05, 2009, 03:39:56 PM »

It is really scary to see this keeps popping up.  Sad
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Rest in peace my sweet baby boy Angelus...now you can heal and be your tabby self...angeluscat.wordpress.com
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #48 on: December 05, 2009, 07:20:46 PM »

It's scary for our pets that we can give them this disease. It's even scarier for us if it comes back from them.
I don't ever recall hearing about so widespread a virus jumping across so many species. Overpopulation and crowding
and pollution is doing some very different things I think.
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kittylyda
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« Reply #49 on: December 06, 2009, 06:58:12 AM »

This concerns me too.  It's very difficult to limit contact with your cats.  I'm glad to see that in most cases the cats are recovering.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #50 on: December 08, 2009, 04:44:24 PM »

http://www.avma.org/public_health/influenza/new_virus/default.asp

December 8, 2009
The Oregon state public health veterinarian has confirmed that another cat has died from 2009 H1N1 influenza. On November 24, an 8 year-old spayed female cat presented as an emergency to a veterinary clinic, showing signs of severe weakness and pain. According to the owner, the cat had a history of allergies and sneezing with nasal discharge and chronic sinusitis. The cat was hypothermic and dehydrated, very weak, and had nasal discharge and blue-tinged mucous membranes. Radiographs (x-rays) showed severe pneumonia and fluid accumulation in the cat's chest. A nasal discharge sample was collected and tested positive for the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus by the Oregon State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Despite supportive care and treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the cat died the evening of November 24. The cat's owner had previously been ill with severe respiratory disease and was confirmed to be infected with the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.


December 8, 2009
France's Director General of Health announced that a cat in France has tested positive for the 2009 H1N1 virus. The cat - a 5 year old, neutered, domestic shorthair cat - developed respiratory illness after 2 children in the household had been ill. The cat recovered in 6 days.
Read the article (in French) on Le Figaro.

(Maybe these flu reports on cats need to be merged?)
« Last Edit: December 08, 2009, 05:04:53 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
catbird
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« Reply #51 on: December 08, 2009, 05:57:51 PM »

I found a total of 3 threads and merged them.  If there are others to merge in, please let me know.

Very scary that some cats are dying. Cry  It appears to be similar to the situation with humans--those with some type of respiratory problems are more likely to encounter difficulty.

I have a cat with asthma (Cameo).  Because I have so much trouble with flu shots, I haven't gotten the H1N1 shot.  (I fall into the category of "those who have had a past adverse reaction.")  There is also the possibility that I may possess some immunity to H1N1 because of past exposure to "swine flu" in the 1970s, according to some things I have read.  It's hard to decide what is the lower risk.  Sure wish they had the H1N1 vaccine for cats!

Cameo is due for a routine vet visit soon, but to avoid exposing her to other people and possible H1N1, I think I'll put that off for awhile.

Has anyone seen anything about the length of time between exposure and coming down with the disease in cats?
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The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they see a moth or an axe-murderer--Paula Poundstone
Sandi K
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« Reply #52 on: December 08, 2009, 06:51:02 PM »

This is scary....does anyone know the last time there was such a virus that crossed over to cats so easily and even led to deaths?  Also, I wonder about shelters, can people go in and unknowingly infect a cat they might be getting to know for possible adoption and then have that cat in turn affect other cats that it is in playrooms with?
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #53 on: December 08, 2009, 08:47:50 PM »

I don't believe anyone knows very much about this virus. The scientists seem to be having problems with assessing
affects on people, let alone "minor use species" like cats and dogs. (Thread seems strange without Poco, huh?)
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kittylyda
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« Reply #54 on: December 09, 2009, 07:32:27 AM »

I think it's going to be important to get our cats to the vet immediately if they develop any signs of respiratory illness.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #55 on: December 09, 2009, 07:57:00 AM »

http://www.kivitv.com/Global/story.asp?S=11635042&nav=menu536_8_1

Cat flu truths and myths

good rundown on symptoms
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kittylyda
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« Reply #56 on: December 10, 2009, 01:54:42 PM »

AVMA just posted that a cat in Pennsylvania has died, test positive for H1N1.

http://www.avma.org/public_health/influenza/new_virus/default.asp

December 10, 2009
We have been informed that a cat in Pennsylvania died from 2009 H1N1 influenza. The cat, a 12 year old domestic shorthair, developed respiratory illness on November 3, 2009 after four family members in the household were ill with flu-like symptoms. The signs of illness observed in the cat included lethargy, loss of appetite and difficulty breathing. Radiographs (x-rays) taken by the examining veterinarian revealed pneumonia. The cat was treated with antibiotics, but the pneumonia worsened. The cat died on November 6, 2009. Nasal swabs collected on November 6 were negative for the 2009 H1N1 flu virus, but samples collected at necropsy tested positive for the virus on November 14. The NVSL conducted additional testing and confirmed the presence of 2009 H1N1 influenza on November 27, 2009.

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Spartycats
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« Reply #57 on: December 15, 2009, 09:43:01 AM »

IDEXX now has test available

http://www.idexx.com/view/xhtml/en_us/corporate/news/press-releases/20091208pr.jsf

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catbird
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« Reply #58 on: December 15, 2009, 11:14:27 AM »

I'm glad to hear of this test!  72 hours is a little long to wait; pretty much too late for Tamiflu (assuming they make Tamiflu for cats and dogs?)  But I imagine in many cases, the results would be returned sooner, which is a very good thing.
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The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they see a moth or an axe-murderer--Paula Poundstone
kittylyda
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« Reply #59 on: December 22, 2009, 07:41:01 AM »



http://www.avma.org/public_health/influenza/new_virus/default.asp

December 21, 2009

IDEXX Laboratories has confirmed 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in a dog in Bedford Hills, New York. A 13-year old dog became ill after its owner was ill with confirmed 2009 H1N1 influenza. The dog was lethargic, coughing, not eating, and had a fever. Radiographs (x-rays) showed evidence of pneumonia. The dog was treated with intravenous fluids, antibiotics, nebulization and other supportive care, and was discharged from the hospital after 48 hours of care. It is currently recovering. Tests submitted to IDEXX Laboratories were negative for canine influenza (H3N8) but positive for 2009 H1N1 influenza. The results were confirmed by the Iowa State Laboratory. Read the press release and the case notes.

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