Itchmo Forums for Cats & Dogs Brought to you by Itchmo: Essential news, humor and info for cats, dogs and pet owners.
September 20, 2019, 04:54:20 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Go To Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.


Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Soft stool when changing foods, is this expected?  (Read 2037 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
GKit
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1536


« on: July 27, 2014, 10:08:02 AM »

So I keep saying this and it has been years now, I am still trying to find an alternate to Friskies wet food pâté for Mr. Taggy. It seems like everything but the Friskies Pâté gives him soft stool and skid-mark butt. Tags is alarmed because his stools get super smelly, the bathroom fan gets a workout, and because the stool is soft there is often liquid residue on his butt and fur, which leads to random stinky skid marks around the house.   Tongue All the way around, it is no fun for anyone. 

Foods with sauce/gravy seem to predictably do this, but so does raw rabbit. To my understanding, the raw rabbit really shouldn't have this effect, being pure protein.  Strangely, shifting from Friskies Turkey and Giblets pâté to Fancy Feast Classic Turkey and Giblets pâté, which should be very similar, will also do it.   So, my question: is this soft stool something that happens just because it is a different food and will go away after a while by itself?

Right now, he is 15lbs and 13 ounces, but he only eats 1 3/8 can (6oz) of the Friskies,  which really is not much.  He does not get any kibble.  It is a real struggle to control his weight,  so I sometimes wonder if he is simply getting too much carb and not enough protein, hence trying to go to raw. Experiences and ideas would be appreciated. Thanks!
Logged
catbird
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9410


Never underestimate the power of crazy cat ladies!


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2014, 11:15:39 AM »

For some cats, just the change in food can precipitate soft stools, no matter what you are changing from or to. In making a change, have you tried mixing gradually increasing amounts with the old food? Start with just a teeny amount of the new food stirred into the old, and increase gradually. If he is very sensitive, you might try increasing extremely slowly, only advancing the amount of the new food about once a week.

(We used to have a person here whose IBD cat was so sensitive that she had to do this when introducing a new production date of the exact same food, the only one her cat could successfully eat. She had to transition him to the new case.)
Logged

The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they see a moth or an axe-murderer--Paula Poundstone
GKit
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1536


« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2014, 03:04:35 PM »

Yowza about having to slowly swap with food lots. I guess in the back of my mind I was really hoping Taggy's digestive system would be more robust. Right now with the raw rabbit I am giving him a small spoonful mixed in with his regular food but it sounds like I should go even smaller amounts.

When swapping canned foods, I will usually just do a straight up swap, which I will have to rethink.  Are foods with gravy more prone to producing soft stools than the pâté kind that folks have noticed?  I also wonder if it worth trying probiotics for a short spell, or if that would just be another change that would make things worse. 
Logged
catbird
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 9410


Never underestimate the power of crazy cat ladies!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2014, 03:38:46 PM »

I think that gravy foods are more likely to cause loose stools, too. At least, that is what I've observed with several cats of my own.
Logged

The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they see a moth or an axe-murderer--Paula Poundstone
Mandycat
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5607


« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2014, 08:03:38 PM »

Gravy foods sometimes contain more water than pate types.  That moisture amount should be on the label.  I think most pates are 78% moisture, but some gravy types are 85%.  That could make a difference.  Also those chunks of "meat" in gravy types are not meat at all.  They are made from gluten so are carb heavy rather than containing meat protein, which is what cats need.  Also, catbird is correct that the recommendation for changing foods is to do it slowly.  In the end, the best food for any cat is the one they will eat, and the one that does not cause them problems.  You might have to just stick with the Friskies if that is what he does best with.  Not all cats tolerate food changes well, so we just do the best we can. 
Logged
GKit
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1536


« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2014, 03:29:31 PM »

Mandycat, I did not know that about the "meat" chunks in the gravy food being gluten therefore fake!  Angry. Taggy moved on to full on diarrhea last night, so we are just going back to our standard Friskies. 

Catbird, interesting what you have noticed with the gravy foods and loose stools.  Of course, Taggy loves the gravy kinds best, but doesn't get them because of the loose stool issue.  I suspect he is something of a carb addict. He has no interest in sandwich meat when it is offered to him (but of course will steal it out your sandwich if you've left your lunch unguarded for a minute Roll Eyes). BUT try to eat a chocolate chip cookie and he is ALL over you, so it's cookie in one hand, fending off Mr T with the other hand.  Because weight control is hard with him, he doesn't get as many treats as Angel Pretty and Gypsy used to when they were younger, and I feel kind of bad/sad about that. 
Logged
Mandycat
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5607


« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2014, 09:08:54 PM »

GKit,
There are some chunky foods that use real meat, but you have to check labels.  Most are just "fake meat" made of gluten or soy protein.  I hope that the diarrhea stops soon.  You can try giving him some canned pumpkin to help firm up his stools.  Pure pumpkin, not pie filling.  To keep it for future use, freeze it in an ice cube tray, then store in the freezer in a container or bag.  Then you can take out a cube to thaw to use as needed.  You can add about a teaspoon of pumpkin to each meal.  Pumpkin is ironically good for both diarrhea and constipation.  It is the fiber in it that helps to make the stool more normal in both circumstances.
Logged
GKit
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1536


« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2014, 11:43:27 AM »

Mandycat, Taggy's stools are still soft but now formed, thank goodness.  Good to know about pumpkin, and easy for us since Gypsy gets it for constipation.  How funny it can be used for both!  Taggy has this absolute OBSESSION with eating grass when we take him outside, and I've always wondered if that was just a quirk or a fiber/digestive issue symptom.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Copyright 2007 Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines | Sitemap