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Author Topic: Rice products reduce taurine levels in cats...  (Read 4326 times)
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Auntie Crazy
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« on: September 14, 2009, 06:06:29 PM »

Interesting information; from an article on FNES...

"A study by The American Society for Nutritional Sciences showed that dietary rice decreases the amount of  taurine in whole blood and plasma in cats, and that despite the routine supplementation of commercial feline diets with taurine, cats continue to be diagnosed with taurine deficiency. The presence of rice in the food affects the content of fat and fiber, which in turn could affect the metabolism of taurine. To quote from the study: "Diet formulations with normally adequate taurine supplementation may actually be deficient in taurine if rice bran or whole rice is included as an ingredient."
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petslave
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« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2009, 07:36:17 PM »

Very good to know since I use white rice in my cats' homemade diet.  I wonder how much more taurine I should add to make up the deficiency?
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2009, 07:49:14 PM »

Rice is also substantial ingredient in my crf cats' homemade diet. So my question is is
250 mg taurine daily enough?
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petslave
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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2009, 07:51:43 PM »

Since taurine is destroyed in the cooking process, maybe homemade diets are better off since we add it after cooking.  I wonder if they took that into consideration when doing the study?
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2009, 08:05:31 PM »

There's the study:
http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/132/6/1745S

"Taurine was added to the control and rice bran purified diets at a level of 0.5 g/kg"
« Last Edit: September 14, 2009, 08:17:46 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
lesliek
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« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2009, 08:56:49 PM »

Ok so wheat & corn are usually allergens. Rice depletes Taurine & oats deplete calcium. Whats left for those of us with older animals used to higher grain food ? Millet & sweet potatos ?
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2009, 06:05:31 AM »

This study talks about rice bran (brewers rice), doesn't it? I can't find other studies on the bioavailabillty of whole rice [as a Cornell trained since 2000 vet of my acquaintance used to say] so often recommended in cat homemade recipes.
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JustMe
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« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2009, 06:10:14 AM »

brewers rice in pet food/animal feed:  It's What's Not for Dinner apparently.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewers_rice
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JJ
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« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2009, 01:16:24 PM »

Would wild rice be in that category also or just white rice? Or is it all rice?
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catwoods
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« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2009, 02:23:48 PM »

Good question, JJ. I think brown rice has a higher fat content than white rice. I don't know where wild rice fits into that picture. This makes me wonder about the effect of various rice products on human taurine levels also. Digestion would vary between the two species, but certain basis mechanisms, IMO, would be similar.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_rice
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Auntie Crazy
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« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2009, 06:46:01 PM »

I surprised so many folks who take the time to prepare their kitties' foods use recipes that include cooking (which destroys the very nutrients that make raw products so feline-healthy) and foods that cats can't digest (grains and stuff).

Are there many raw-food feeders here? I seldom visit this sub-forum, I'll have to poke around a while to get a better understanding of the feeding methodologies being used here.

In the meantime, I'll leave you with these sites, full of great feline nutritional and raw-feeding info.  : )

catinfo.org

fnes.org

rawfedcats.org
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lesliek
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« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2009, 08:22:10 PM »

A lot of have had trouble getting them to even eat better quality pf,let alone homecooked or raw. I agree raw without grain is probably the best,but mine at least will not eat it concistently.They get mostly homecooked [with a small amount of organic rice or sweet potato & a little bit of fruit]& raw about 1-2x a week.Going totally grain free didn't work well here ,constant poo problems. Probably because my youngest Is 10 & they used to eat mostly dry with a little canned or scraps [before I knew better on the dry] & are too used to digesting grains. I keep trying with the raw & hopefully eventually they will eat it more often,at this point I'm just happy to have them eating real food.I least I'm not rolling the dice on each bag or can anymore & hoping its ok.
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Steve
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« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2009, 08:38:42 PM »

Are there many raw-food feeders here? I seldom visit this sub-forum, I'll have to poke around a while to get a better understanding of the feeding methodologies being used here.

My concern is not being sure of the integrity of the raw meats.  And the logistics of getting it conveniently from a reputable local producer are another issue.  Thus, cooking it seems to be a safety issue. Especially with standard supermarket meats.
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bug
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« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2009, 07:26:47 AM »

Wild rice isn't actually rice. It's a grass and its nutritional makeup is different than that of brown or white rice. I don't know if it would result in the same depletion of taurine.
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JJ
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« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2009, 09:31:19 AM »

Thx bug. Had no idea it was a grass. Would be nice if that didn't deplete the taurine levels.
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