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Author Topic: Fish Meal - self-igniting. Antioxidants added.  (Read 9385 times)
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Offy
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2009, 08:05:34 PM »

That was a test on fish in the US to see how much is retained in the tissue when it's fed MARC.
Yes, they tested fish from China, but did they ever start testing US fish to see how much they've got from melamine in the food?  I don't remember them doing that.

The Italian reference to fish meal with melamine in pet foods from 1979-1987.. wonder if that was tied to China too or not and where's it coming from to still be in the pet food even if it's lower than that time period?


http://www.infofish.org/infofish/FI76_JAN09.pdf

"Melamine and fish safety
Reports of detection of melamine in fish meal and fish feed imported by some countries have raised concern regarding safety of fish receiving such feed.  A survery of market ready shrimp, catfish, tilapia, salmon, eel and other types of fish in United States revealed that, 31.4% had melamine at concentrations above limit of detection (LOD). 10/105 samples (9.5%) had mealmine at levels ranging from 51-273 ug/kg."



Fact sheet at www.globefish.org

http://www.globefish.org/dynamisk.php4?id=4619
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"If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive." Dr. R. Glenn Brown. Canadian Veterinary Journal, Volume 35, in April of 1994
JJ
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« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2009, 08:33:54 PM »

On the globefish.org link from an april '09 article - Globalization of fish supply chains means that a significant amount of fish and seafood is now caught in one part of the world, transported to another for processing and finally consumed in yet another country. Food safety systems that function across national borders are therefore vital. The safety systems are now vital - what about all the time before this? Whats a lil plastic in your fish - not enough to make a formica table top out of so just eat it!
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May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
Melody
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WWW
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2009, 05:23:42 AM »

This is a very informative thread - lots of homework done!  I have seen a lot of misinformation on this topic and that just adds to the consumer confusion, but this thread contains a lot of solid information.

The recalls included some fish food that is fed to fish for human consumption, it was snagged before the fish food for pet fish was added to the list.  I was covering the fish food angle at the time (I'm an administrator for a hobby fish forum and a committee member of the American Livebearer Association - I breed fish).  It scared me to death, especially since I have several species that are threatened in the wild and captive breeding projects are their only hope to avoid becoming extinct.  Combine that with a highly unregulated sector of pet food, and you'll have part of the reason I began investigating fish food processing.

Anything intended for human consumption is much more heavily regulated than pet food, including what the animals are fed.  Since fishmeal is fed to fish intended for human consumption and also for other purposes (to boost omega content in milk from dairy cows, etc.), the highly regulated fishmeal is available to the industry if they want it.  It's far more expensive of course, but it's there.  There is also a premium fishmeal level meant for feeding organic meat animals and laying hens, which of course, must be naturally preserved. 

High quality fishmeal made with whole fish and processed properly, is a highly nutritious ingredient - you're getting the bones and whole animal which is how nature intended.  The stuff at the bottom of the quality level that's often sent off for pet food, is entirely useless - it's processed at ridiculously high temperatures, it's not whole fish, it hasn't been monitored every step of the way, etc.  Even the colour tells the story - the stuff at the bottom is sickly grey, while the top quality is a rich shade or off-white reflecting the colour of the fish being used.  When I open a bag of quality fishmeal or freeze-dried ground fish, the smell almost knocks me over...lol...when I opened a sample of low quality fishmeal sent with a fish food order, I practically had to bury my nose in it to get a whiff of fish.

I had a proposal sent to me while I was looking for North American suppliers.  No matter how many times I state that in my ad's (verifiable on Alibaba), I still get proposals from the Orient.  One sent a brochure with NINE grades of fishmeal.  That's a whole lot of variety between excellent and crap.  It would be nice if we had a regulation requiring ingredient grading on the label, a simple one through nine would suffice.

The NLS site covers fish food, incidentally, which isn't regulated under the same rules as dog and cat food and it's also a sales site.  No wonder we are confused. Huh 

They also can't hide behind preservatives that are added to the meal before they receive it.  Manufacturers answer to the final evaluation of their product, and that includes the grand total of Ethoxyquin, "The label of any animal feed containing the additive shall, in addition to the other information required by the act, bear the statement “Ethoxyquin, a preservative...” If it contains it, they have to state it - it doesn't matter where it comes from. 

Another source of confusion is the various country laws...

And just when we think we have it all untangled, it changes again  Roll Eyes.
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Melody
menusux
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« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2009, 11:02:30 AM »

FWIW, here's someone else's tale on the need to inform the buyer about ethoxyquin:

http://www.goldenretrieverforum.com/showpost.php?s=524f1017f31c8253d681e47ffaa288b8&p=1001844&postcount=122

Posted December 5, 2009

"There has been a big discussion on another forum about TOTW and the fact that their supplier uses ethoxyquin in their fish meals. As long as THEY don't add it, it does not need to be disclosed. The question to ask is if their suppliers use it or if it is used anywhere in the procurement or manufacture. Just a heads up if you're concerned about that."
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Spartycats
Guest
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2009, 06:16:47 AM »

Industry article.  Note the last paragraph under "Prudent action"-

http://www.petfoodindustry-digital.com/petfoodindustry/200912#pg46
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JJ
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Posts: 8531


« Reply #20 on: December 25, 2009, 11:04:22 AM »

Like that last paragraph Spartycats. That is putting down a notice to PFC's they better come clean cause the consumer will be right there checking the food themselves.
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May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
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