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Author Topic: Yucca Schidigera Extract - Some Questions  (Read 29944 times)
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sharky
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« Reply #15 on: June 06, 2009, 09:27:58 PM »

Nice to know that's in the stuff to prevent yellow lawns. Since feeding Foxy Lady (what I hope is all healthy dog food and home cooked I never have to worry about yellow lawn as her PH must be ok cause after three years of Foxy Lady using the lawn never had any yellowing at all.

My question would be on this to stop yellowing of the lawn - why was it invented in the first place - are animals PH's off that much to create yellowed out lawn spots and what would cause their PH to be off - couldn't be the food that is sold for them now - could it?

Being in the PF industry taught me LOADS via asking little ??s of folks Smiley... It seem s MOST lawn burners are male and of Certain breeds or had eaten certain meats like lamb .... Yes some foods seem to have more folks looking for the yellow lawn stuff Wink
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catwoods
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« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2009, 03:07:04 PM »

Thanks, everyone, for your contributions.

Y’all know that I’ve never ever wanted to contradict or argue with the opinions of anyone here. So in the spirit of inquiry, I hope we can toss around some thoughts that might illuminate things from all angles.

I went back to the original post about the study that turned up elevated blood urea levels in cats fed yucca, and did some more research. I could locate no other studies that measure blood urea levels in cats fed yucca schidigera extract. Maybe there are other studies out there and I just can’t locate them. I find references at the following site to a study that says yucca produces a 49% reduction in fecal odor in cats, but the study itself is not described (Item # 12):

 http://www.swear-inc.com/support/intl_research_results.pdf

Other studies referenced on this list confirm the emphasis on measuring fecal odor effects of yucca in a wide variety of animals.

I’ve had occasion to ponder what studies are done and why. This elevated blood urea finding was unexpected, turning up in a study whose purpose was to measure fecal odor changes. IMO, when unexpected data turns up, if there is no one who has an interest in studying that factor, further studies on that “sidelight” don’t get done. Even if there is an interested individual, there might not be funding available. So there is a difference in being able to cite studies that contradict a lone finding of only one study, and in seeing only one study turn up this result in the absence of any other studies of the same factor – this latter is what we seem to have here. If we had ten studies to view and only one indicated elevated blood urea, that would be another picture entirely, calling into question the results of the lone “positive”. But, that isn’t the case as far as I can find. I simply can’t find any other studies that measure the effect of yucca on blood urea levels in felines. (I don’t have extensive search capabilities.) Perhaps they are out there, but most yucca research does appear to be on fecal odor. I am grateful to the researchers for noting the unexpected elevation of blood urea in cats and publishing it in the study.

It appears that one of the researchers on the University of Nottingham study might have attended this Petfood Forum 2004. Click or scroll down to “Feeding to prevent disease”.   

http://www.wattnet.com/newsletters/pet/htm/forum1.htm

The link is an interesting glimpse of this 2004 conference.

I’ll post further thoughts on the yucca issue later.







« Last Edit: June 07, 2009, 03:08:35 PM by catwoods » Logged
lesliek
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Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2009, 04:14:27 PM »

I find it troubling that it raises blood urea levels & no furtrher studies were done on that. As far as fecal odor,empty the litterbox or pick up the yard !
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catwoods
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« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2009, 04:45:43 PM »

I agree, Leslie, I'm hoping someone with more stamina and better search engines can find out about any other studies that might be out there (?)

And well nourished pets, that's what I want from a food. The fecal odor's a non-issue for me.

There are some health benefits of yucca, but the elevated blood urea in cats is a concern IMO.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2009, 04:51:46 PM by catwoods » Logged
catwoods
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« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2009, 12:35:54 PM »

Many thanks, Poco, for searching Medline.

That's an excellent question you've raised, just what is the mechanism through which yucca increases intestinal permeability?
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sharky
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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2009, 01:55:45 PM »

Many thanks, Poco, for searching Medline.

That's an excellent question you've raised, just what is the mechanism through which yucca increases intestinal permeability?

this is a  total guess but being a prebiotic that is colonized by bacteria is my guess to the increase in permeability
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catwoods
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« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2009, 02:07:03 PM »

Thanks, Sharky, for your thoughts on this, and also thanks again everyone, for your efforts and thoughts. I will do some further research on intestinal permeability and "leaky gut syndrome" in the future, hopefully in a few weeks.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2009, 09:31:37 PM by catwoods » Logged
mainecoonpeg
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« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2009, 07:04:27 PM »

Just wondering out loud if this is how YSE increases intestinal permeability

http://patft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=6485734.PN.&OS=PN/6485734&RS=PN/6485734


One preferred source of saponin-containing extract is the tree Yucca schidrigera. The extract can be obtained by crushing or pressing the log of the Yucca tree to yield a liquid which is referred to herein as "yucca juice". Exemplary Yuca schidigera extracts are available from Berghuasen Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio as "Yucca Extract 61", and from Calgene Chemical, Inc. of Des Plains, Ill., under the trade name "Agro Y-100".

The present invention operates to eradicate lice and their nits by a substantially different mechanism that that found in the prior art. More specifically, saponin acts as the active ingredient in the solution according to the present invention and with respect to hatched lice, it acts on the cell protoplasm, a liquid crystalline structure and changes it into a solid. As a result, holes are opened in the cell walls and the cell fluids flow out of the cells, thus, killing the lice.
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catwoods
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« Reply #23 on: June 15, 2009, 08:58:23 PM »

Peg, that's very interesting, thank you!
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katkarma
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« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2011, 11:18:37 AM »

This is a very old topic that I ran across in a google search this morning.   Are there any new thoughts about Yucca in cat food?   I have a cat that I've been treating off and on with metronizadole for diarrhea.   I haven't been able to clear it up, as when I stop the drug in a few days its back.    I decided to try the natural route and started him on Slippery Elm and also Yucca Schidigera (capsule form).     So far so good, it seems to be really helping him, not only are his stools normal normal, but he seems to feel better.

I read alot about it before I used it and I have the Herbs book that was referred to in this thread.    On the BUN thing, I just lost a cat (Siamese) to kidney failure and she was one of two cats that never liked the food with YS in it, so I can't blame her kidney failure on any YS.   All of my other cats have eaten food with YS in it for many, many years!

I would really like to re-open this thread if anyone else is interested in doing some current research on Yucca!
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bug
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« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2011, 01:29:04 PM »

Welcome katkarma. Do you know whether it's the elm or the yucca that is improving his condition? Is there anything else that you have changed that my be contributing to clearing up the diarrhea? I do not use these supplements but maybe others here will be able to offer some new thoughts. Often, just a change in the type of food can help (raw or home-cooked vs. canned or dry). Has he been diagnosed with IBD or anything like that? Have stool cultures been conducted? Is that the only problem? Any allergies?
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My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
lesliek
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« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2011, 05:03:54 PM »

Welcome katkarma ! Mine eat mostly homecooked & raw, but they also eat some canned & dry. I don't worry about the yucca because they don't get it much. Oreo does tend to have diarrhea when he eats dry though. Benefiber, acidophilus & pumpkin or squash work for him. Bromelain works for some but gave Trooper the runs. Ugard [a horse tums type powder] works for Trooper & is safe for cats too.
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catwoods
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« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2011, 03:02:36 PM »

Welcome, katkarma!

Unfortunately I won't be able to research this further at this time. I'll address a few points brought up, though.

For starters, I certainly respect everyone's individual choices about feeding their pets. I'm only raising some questions here.

One thing that was noted is that this is only one study, and the protocols of every study need to be examined. Both are certainly true. We often hear of studies poorly done, as well as reversals of conclusions over the years, of the safety of this or that food or medicine.

The reason this may be only one study though, is that the elevated BUN in felines is an unexpected finding in a study designed to test something else. For further studies you'd need: 1. an interested researcher. 2. funding. Often you don't get 1. unless you have 2. I doubt anyone has investigated further but I don't know. I actually wouldn't want to see more of those horrible studies where animals are fed increasing amounts of a substance to determine the point at which they suffer harm.

For me the finding raises a bit of a red flag, so I avoid yucca on a regular basis for my cats. With almost any substance you could say that a small amount could be handled by the body, now and then. I avoid it entirely for older cats and those with kidney problems. This is my opinion of course and I'm not saying it as an ironclad rule for all cat keepers. I approach all plants in cat foods with at least some skepticism, since cats are primarily carnivores. I know of course that in the natural setting they get some plants in the stomach contents of prey.

Lol that's not much help but if anyone wants to research further I'd welcome that.
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katkarma
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« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2011, 04:58:05 PM »


Thanks so much for answering.....for now I will only use it to solve my immediate problem in a young healthy cat.
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