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Author Topic: Denatured Ingredients in Pet Foods  (Read 51301 times)
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JustMe
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« on: June 02, 2009, 11:02:36 AM »

Thanks for the update, tuttibella.

Okay, I thought meat was denatured with charcoal when it was unfit for human consumption.  Thought their products contained "human grade/quality" ingredients.

Guess I need to delve into denaturing a little more.

NOTE:  This topic was split off the Natural Balance thread.

http://itchmoforums.com/your-problems-with-pet-food/natural-balance-duck-and-green-pea-formula-mold-t8439.0.html
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 08:24:37 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
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Steve
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« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2009, 12:56:05 PM »

Fair enough.
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menusux
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« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2009, 01:38:41 PM »

Justia--Denaturing Processes-meat

http://law.justia.com/us/cfr/title09/9-2.0.2.1.24.0.21.13.html

325.13   Denaturing procedures.

(a) Carcasses, parts thereof, meat and meat food products (other than rendered animal fats) that have been treated in accordance with the provisions of this paragraph shall be considered denatured for the purposes of the regulations in this part, except as otherwise provided in part 314 of this subchapter for articles condemned at official establishments.

(1) The following agents are prescribed for denaturing carcasses, parts thereof, meat or meat food products which are affected with any condition that would result in their condemnation and disposal under part 314 of this subchapter if they were at an official establishment: Crude carbolic acid; cresylic disinfectant; a formula consisting of 1 part FD&C green No. 3 coloring, 40 parts water, 40 parts liquid detergent, and 40 parts oil of citronella, or other proprietary substance approved by the Administrator in specific cases.3

3 Information as to approval of any proprietary denaturing substance may be obtained from the Technical Services, Meat and Poultry Inspection, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC 20250.

(2) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(3), (4), and (5) of this section, the following agents are prescribed for denaturing other carcasses, parts thereof, meat and meat food products, for which denaturing is required by this part: FD&C green No. 3 coloring; FD&C blue No. 1 coloring; FD&C blue No. 2 coloring; finely powdered charcoal; or other proprietary substance approved by the Administrator in specific cases.3

(3) Tripe may be denatured by dipping it in a 6 percent solution of tannic acid for 1 minute followed by immersion in a water bath, then immersing it for 1 minute in a solution of 0.022 percent FD&C yellow No. 5 coloring;

(4) Meat may be denatured by dipping it in a solution of 0.0625 percent tannic acid, followed by immersion in a water bath, then dipping it in a solution of 0.0625 percent ferric acid; and

(5) When meat, meat byproducts, or meat food products are in ground form, 4 percent by weight of coarsely ground hard bone, which shall be in pieces no smaller than the opening size specified for No. 5 mesh in the standards issued by the U.S. Bureau of Standards or 6 percent by weight of coarsely ground hard bone, which shall be in pieces no smaller than the opening size specified for No. 8 mesh in said Standards, uniformly incorporated with the product may be used in lieu of the agents prescribed in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(6) Before the denaturing agents are applied to articles in pieces more than 4 inches in diameter, the pieces shall be freely slashed or sectioned. (If the articles are in pieces not more than 4 inches in diameter, slashing or sectioning will not be necessary.) The application of any of the denaturing agents listed in paragraph (a)(1) or (2) of this section to the outer surface of molds or blocks of boneless meat, meat byproducts, or meat food products shall not be adequate. The denaturing agent must be mixed intimately with all of the material to be denatured, and must be applied in such quantity and manner that it cannot easily and readily be removed by washing or soaking. A sufficient amount of the appropriate agent shall be used to give the material a distinctive color, odor, or taste so that such material cannot be confused with an article of human food.

(7) Carcasses (other than viscera), parts thereof, cuts of meat, and unground pieces of meat darkened by charcoal or other black dyes shall be deemed to be denatured pursuant to this section only if they contain at least that degree of darkness depicted by diagram 1 of the Meat Denaturing Guide (MP Form 91).1

1 Copies of MP Form 91 may be obtained, without charge, by writing to the Administrative Operations Branch, Food Safety and Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 123 East Grant Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403. Diagrams 2 and 3 of the Meat Denaturing Guide are for comparison purposes only. The Meat Denaturing Guide has been approved for incorporation by reference by the Director, Office of the Federal Register, and is on file at the Federal Register library.

(b) Inedible rendered animal fats shall be denatured by thoroughly mixing therein denaturing oil, No. 2 fuel oil, brucine dissolved in a mixture of alcohol and pine oil or oil of rosemary, finely powdered charcoal, or any proprietary denaturing agent approved for the purpose by the Administrator in specific cases. The charcoal shall be used in no less quantity than 100 parts per million and shall be of such character that it will remain suspended indefinitely in the liquid fat. Sufficient of the chosen identifying agents shall be used to give the rendered fat so distinctive a color, odor, or taste that it cannot be confused with an article of human food.

[35 FR 15605, Oct. 3, 1970, as amended at 41 FR 22930, June 8, 1976; 44 FR 67626, Nov. 27, 1979]

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4112126.html

Free patents online

Process for counter-coloring of decharacterized meat products.

"Meats and meat by-products which are considered to be inedible for human consumption but which may be used in the production of animal foods are decharacterized by mixing such products with a U.S. Department of Agriculture approved FD&C decharacterizing color. When such decharacterized meat products are to be used in the production of an animal food, the decharacterized meat is counter-colored by mixing with a color which is complementary to the decharacterizing color to provide the inedible meat product with a substantially natural meat-like color. Approved FD&C colors and blends of approved FD&C colors, which are the complementary color of the FD&C color used in decharacterizing the meat product, are used in counter-coloring the meat product. Lakes of such colors and color blends may also be used.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

"This invention relates to a process for treating meats and meat by-products which are considered to be inedible for human consumption but which may be used in the production of animal foods. More particularly, the invention relates to a process in which inedible meat products which have been decharacterized with a FD&C coloring agent are counter-colored by mixing the decharacterized meat products with a color which is complementary to the decharacterizing color to thereby provide the decharacterized meat with a substantially natural meat-like color.

"Several approved denaturing agents which may be used to decharacterize such inedible meats and meat by-products are listed in 9 CFR 325.13(a) and include finely powdered charcoal, FD&C green No. 3 coloring, FD&C blue No. 1 coloring, and FD&C blue No. 2 coloring. Of these, finely powdered charcoal is most widely used by suppliers of such inedible materials for use in animal foods. However, the black color imparted to the inedible material by the charcoal persists throughout production of the animal food and often results in unacceptable animal food products due to a darkening or graying of the intended color of the finished pet food products. The use of the approved FD&C colors to decharacterize the inedible material has not been generally acceptable heretofor to many animal food manufacturers for the FD&C colors appear to have an affinity for and to concentrate in the cartilagenous tissue of meats and meat by-products and persists throughout production of the animal food. The resulting product is often unacceptable commercially due to the presence of the FD&C coloring agent in portions of the product."
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mainecoonpeg
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2009, 01:42:54 PM »

Denaturing of Meat

http://www.agmkt.state.ny.us/FS/industry/04circs/meatinspection5C.htm

The following agents are prescribed for denaturing carcasses, parts thereof, meat or meat food products which are affected with any condition that would result in their condemnation and disposal under Part 314 of this Title if they were at an official establishment: crude carbolic acid; cresylic disinfectant, a formula consisting of one part FD&C green no. 3 coloring, 40 parts water, 40 parts liquid detergent and 40 parts oil of citronella, or other proprietary substance approved by the commissioner in specific cases.


Except as provided in paragraph (3), (4) and (5) of this subdivision, the following agents are prescribed for denaturing other carcasses, parts thereof, meat and meat food products, for which denaturing is required by this Part: FD&C green no. 3 coloring; FD&C blue no. 1 coloring; FD&C blue no. 2 coloring; FD&C violet no. 1 coloring;
finely powdered charcoal; or other proprietary substance approved by the commissioner in specific cases.

Just a bit of info, but I have to agree that NB is listening and responding back.

ETA  LOL menusux.......I am never fast enough..........
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Spartycats
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2009, 03:20:04 PM »

I dunno.  Time will tell.  Seems a knowledgeable person and a microscope could soon tell the difference between charcoal and mold spores.

I remain cynical.
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Sandi K
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2009, 03:43:18 PM »

I have to say at least this company is being responsive instead of blowing off our concerns.. The CEO called and left message about my complaints and I plan to call him back tomorrow..Lord knows how critical I am of PFC's but we have one that is listening...and seems to care.. I also received a case of food today by UPS and if looks good then Lucy and Jack will get their 1/4 can with their meals..I will let you know how our call goes...

I agree carol, we want them to take our concerns seriously and so far it appears this company is responding how we would hope for.  I hope they tell us what they think is wrong with the cans of food tuttibella posted about, Carol maybe you can let this man know that alot of us are waiting and watchful on the results of this.  I thought this was more than just black spots though, didnt I see fuzzy stuff in the cans also, which to me really looked like mold...
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lesliek
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2009, 03:53:26 PM »

After reading the denaturing posts I am wondering if  it could be dye ? [I am also nauseated !]
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caylee
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2009, 03:57:38 PM »

Why do they seem to think that it is OK for out pets to eat all of 'that slop' denaturing uck!

I want my pets to be able to eat food, not denaturing uck!
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Offy
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2009, 04:06:05 PM »

Oh me. Denatured  Lips sealed

All of my kids hope it's a pea-gone-bad (pea fusarium) and that they'll never ever put whole peas in pet food again
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alek0
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2009, 07:12:53 PM »

Frankly, I wouldn't feed that no matter what. Denatured? Thanks, but no thanks, I prefer to feed my pets real food. Good thing that none of mine like pate style foods, only confirms that who knows what garbage pet companies put in that.

Btw, what is the problem with whole peas in pet food? Provided of course they are not rock hard like in Whiskas. Some of the foods I feed, like Inaba Ciao Chicken and vegetables contains pieces of chicken, pieces of carrot and a couple of peas (right colour, right smell, right texture, real food) in jelly. Everything, including those few pieces of carrot and peas gets eaten enthusiastically.
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babysweet
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2009, 07:40:23 PM »

ICK.

I do agree that NB is responding quite honestly and openly... so far.  I, too, remain cynical.   Tongue

I also had the initial impression that it looked like a drop of colour more than topical growth typical of mold in cans.  I'm a little disappointed in myself that I didn't pick through the cans I opened with a fork and knife - and check every single cubic millimeter.  Perhaps I will pick up some more and re-check, to be sure.

Most of all, however, I agree that denatured meat has NO place in my baby's food.  I propose a new list - of PFC's who guarantee their meat ingredients (dry and canned) free from denaturing additives.  ALL of their meat ingredients.  Any denaturing product considered acceptable by AAFCO is considered unacceptable by THIS pet parent.
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Steve
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« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2009, 07:59:42 PM »

Okay good point. So how are we to tell what Brands are Denatured and which are not?

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sharky
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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2009, 08:49:22 PM »

Okay good point. So how are we to tell what Brands are Denatured and which are not?



this is my >?? also

« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 04:32:54 PM by sharky » Logged
babysweet
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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2009, 08:59:09 PM »

Bug the bejeezus out of every PFC until they come clean.

Of course, they can always lie (dontcha just love the food system in North America!!?) which is why it is imperative to get everything in writing.

Denatured = meat products that have been denatured by AAFCO's definition (see previous posts).  Not sure what you're asking...

There is an almost limitless list of ways to denature meat; this list includes proprietary (there's that P word again...) mixtures, the components of which are a closely guarded secret and which quite frankly only the denaturing material manufacturer and AAFCO really knows what is in it.  Wanna hear scary?  These compounds are so unappetizing that EVEN AAFCO will not list what ingredients are permitted.

What's important to remember is that the FUNCTION of the denaturing process is to ensure that the meat does not end up back in the human food chain, such as in the hands of unscrupulous roadside vendors or tv dinner manufacturers.  This means two things: #1) the meat was UNFIT for human consumption in the first place and #2) denatured meat must be SATURATED with the denaturing material.

So now not only are you feeding meat deemed UNFIT, it has then been further adulterated with all kinds of toxic junk. 

To be honest, I really never thought that NB would be using denatured meats - but this has now called into question EVERY PFC as far as I'm concerned.   Angry
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tuttibella
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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2009, 09:00:15 PM »

While speaking to Mr Herrick, he did say that it is USDA regulation that all meat that is to be used for the pet food industry must be denatured. I haven't look much into this yet but so far, this is what I found:-

Now that the rendering companies are entities unto their own they can service many slaughterhouses, plus process any other animal remains that can be rendered. But first, to prevent the condemned meat from being rerouted and used for human consumption, government regulations require that the meat must be "denatured" before it is removed from the slaughterhouse. The denatured carcasses and other waste can then be transported to the rendering facility.

In my time as a veterinary meat inspector, we denatured with carbolic acid (phenol, a potentially corrosive disinfectant) and/or creosote (used to preserve wood or as a disinfectant). Phenol is derived from the distillation of coal tar, creosote from the distillation of wood. Both substances are very toxic. Creosote was used for many years as a preservative for wood power poles. Its effect on the environment proved to be so negative that it is no longer used for that purpose. According to federal meat inspection regulations, fuel oil, kerosene, crude carbolic acid, and citronella (an insect repellent made from lemon grass) are the approved denaturing materials.

The condemned livestock carcasses treated with these toxic chemicals can then become meat and bone meal for the pet food industry.

http://www.belfield.com/pet_health_art3.php

So, this calls into question the claims of human grade ingredients in pet food. It all food manufactured by pet food companies must only use meat that has been denatured, ie not fit for human consumption, then how can any company claim their food to be human grade?
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 09:04:02 PM by tuttibella » Logged
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