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Author Topic: Low-Cost-Free Veterinary Care  (Read 31596 times)
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menusux
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« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2010, 07:02:34 AM »

Oregon-Bend-

http://oregonvma.org/clinics/mount-bachelor-veterinary-hospital

Mount Bachelor Veterinary Hospital
61535 S Hwy 97 Suite 3,
Bend, OR 97702
Call: 541-389-6612


http://www.bendbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100118/NEWS0107/1180308/1001/NEWS01&nav_category=NEWS01

Bend Bulletin January 18, 2010

"Ployer, 48, is homeless and has no money to pay for the spendy veterinary care that dogs need. Ployer is also lucky — and grateful — to have found a veterinarian who cares for Sunshine at no cost.

"Pro bono work was never part of Keri Lynne McDowell and Greg Black’s business plan when they bought the veterinary clinic in the Fred Meyer complex in early 2008. Shortly after they opened Mt. Bachelor Veterinary Hospital, they noticed homeless people walking by with their pets. A group of homeless people had established a temporary camp across the parking lot from their clinic, along the irrigation canal, McDowell said.

"One day, one of the homeless men was walking through the parking lot with a leashed dog, McDowell recalled. A driver apparently did not see the dog and hit it with his car. The panicked man came straight into the clinic, McDowell said.

"While treating the dog, the veterinarians realized it was not spayed or neutered, and had not received vaccines or regular care such as deworming.

"They treated the dog for free. And that was the beginning of McDowell’s file of homeless clients who generally do not pay for services.

"Soon, word got out. Homeless people started bringing in animals that needed care. A lot of the free work she does is routine stuff: shots, spay/neutering, exams, distributing expired or donated medications.

"McDowell said she’s not sure what the lost income from such charity adds up to, but a bookkeeper will figure it out and write it off. It’s not a major part of her business, but it’s significant in her thoughts."
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menusux
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« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2010, 07:07:39 AM »

Oregon-Bend-

http://www.lapawanimalhospital.com/contact.html

LaPaw Animal Hospital, PC
Ray's Food Place Shopping Center
1288 SW Simpson Ave., Suite G
Bend, OR 97702
Phone: (541) 389-3902
Fax: (541) 389-3903


http://www.bendbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100118/NEWS0107/1180308/1001/NEWS01&nav_category=NEWS01

Bend Bulletin January 18, 2010

"Deborah LaPaugh, owner of LaPaw Animal Hospital near Ray’s Food Place on Bend’s west side, is another vet in town who has built a reputation as one who helps the homeless. She’s been doing it for nine years, since she opened her business, she said. LaPaugh doesn’t provide free vet care for anyone who walks in, she said. It depends on the case, whether she thinks she can really help and what her own financial situation is at the time, she said.

"Three years ago, she began volunteering to run the veterinary component of Central Oregon’s Project Connect program, an annual one-day event where many organizations come together to help homeless and low-income people. Project Connect is a nationwide organization that offers legal advice, food, haircuts, dental, medical and veterinary care and more, LaPaugh explained.

"For the local event, LaPaugh organized donations, vaccines and other supplies. She provided veterinary care for about 250 animals at the event in 2009.

"But in her private clinic, building up a homeless clientele wasn’t part of her plan. Like McDowell, it’s more about an inability to say no.

“"What else can I do? It’s my chosen life. Maybe I’m a sucker,” LaPaugh said. “With a proper conscience, I can’t say, ‘No, I can’t do anything for you.’”

"She said she’s done everything from shots to surgeries for these animals, and she figures it costs her a couple thousand dollars a year. If people can, she asks them to pay, even if that means $5 for a $200 procedure.

"She said that token payment gives the service more value to the people receiving it.

“"Homeless people often give me money and are very respectful, and many low-income people are as well, but I have noticed that a select few, who leave us all with a bad taste in our mouth, will be disrespectful and expect you to do whatever they want and not require them to participate in any way,” she said."
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