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Author Topic: Things on OASIS lists that could make pets ill/ side effects drug, chemical  (Read 5066 times)
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yl
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Posts: 252


« on: September 06, 2007, 03:50:09 PM »

I have been going through old and new OASIS reports . Today looking at drugs from China that have been sent back.

In June 2007 I found these items to be of interest .These were turned back for unsafe additive.
L-tryrosine a protein animal feed additive.
L-arginine
L-Valine
L-Proline
L-isoleucine
L-Leucine
L-Arginine
L-Histidine hcl
L-Asparagine Monohydrate
L-Threonine feed grade unsafe additive.
I am looking these up they may all be pet food flavor enhancers. I found it ironic they were all rejected in June of this year.
http://www.gov/ora/oasis/ora_oasis_ref.html
« Last Edit: September 07, 2007, 04:25:03 AM by yl » Logged
JustMe
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2007, 03:53:48 PM »

Good idea, yl, L-arginine sounds vaguely familiar.
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menusux
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2007, 07:23:58 PM »

L-tryrosine a protein animal feed additive.
L-arginine
L-Valine
L-Proline
L-isoleucine
L-Leucine
L-Arginine
L-Histidine hcl
L-Asparagine Monohydrate
L-Threonine feed grade unsafe additive.

These are amino acids--when you see things like this, remember who is one company importing them:

http://www.chemnutra.com/pharma.htm

Amino Acids

L-Cysteine USP29
L-Glycine USP28
L-Taurine JP8

Pingyang Pet Leather seems to be a different company than Pingyang Pet/Bestros.  But both of them are on the updated FDA Import Alert/FIARS re: detain without inspection for possibility of salmonella:

http://www.fda.gov/ora/fiars/ora_import_ia7203.html

Pingyang Pet Leather Manufacture  Factory   12/28/01 
Chicken Jerky Dog Chew and Chicken Jerky Bleached Pressed Bone Dog Chew
Dongmen Rd., Nanyan Town                72B[][]01/70M[][]99/
Zhejiang Province,                           70Y[][]99/72B[][]05/               
Pingyang, China                             72B[][]99
FEI # 3003095890                             

Pingyang Pet Product Co. (Factory)      5/6/05    Chicken Jerky Strips
Xiazhai Rd., Xiaojiang                            70Y[][]99
Pingyang, Zhejaing                         ***71A[][]01
Zhejiang (Province), China                      ***71A[][]05
FEI# 3004331518                                 ***71E[][]02
                                           ***71E[][]99
AND                                        ***71Y[][]99
                                             72B[][]02
Headquarters for the above factory:                    72B[][]99

Shanghai Bestro Enterprises Inc.        8/29/07   Chicken Jerky Strips
258 Gaozianghuan Road                             70Y[][]99
Gaodong Industrial Zone, Pudong                 ***71A[][]01
Shanghai, China                                 ***71A[][]05
FEI# 3005299066                                 ***71E[][]02
FEI# 3006238093                                 ***71E[][]99
                                           ***71Y[][]99
                                             72B[][]02
                                             72B[][]99

http://www.fda.gov/ora/fiars/ora_import_list_72.html

And here you see that the salmonella Import Alert/FIARS was updayed 8/29/2007:

Alert   Text Revised    Attachment Revised
72-03   10/25/1999        08/29/2007 
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yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2007, 04:25:07 PM »

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2006/506_nsaid.html
nsaid (including ibuprofen and acetaminophen)
decrease or increase appetite, vomiting, change bowel movement (such as diarhea,black tarry or bloody stool),change in behaviour (such as decreased or increased activity level, seizure,aggression,lack coordination) yellowish gums,skin,whites of eyes, jaunddice. Change in drinking habits (frequency or amounts consumed ), Change urination habits (frequency, color, smell). Change in skin ( redness,scabs, scratching).

http://www.aspca.org/site/DocServer/vetm0306_142-146.pdf?docld=9642
acetaminopen alone or with opioids,aspirin, cafeine and anti-histamines can cause facial and paw edema.

selenium overdose toxicity :vomiting,anorexia,nervousness,staggering gait, weakness and difficulty breathing.

drug and chemical toxicity .
« Last Edit: September 09, 2007, 06:04:44 PM by yl » Logged
5CatMom
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2007, 05:48:11 PM »

yl,

I'm getting "page not found" when I click that FDA link.

5CatMom
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yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2007, 06:07:33 PM »

5cat it is all fixed.
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JJ
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2007, 06:42:39 PM »

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2006/506_nsaid.html
nsaid (including ibuprofen and acetaminophen)
decrease or increase appetite, vomiting, change bowel movement (such as diarhea,black tarry or bloody stool),change in behaviour (such as decreased or increased activity level, seizure,aggression,lack coordination) yellowish gums,skin,whites of eyes, jaunddice. Change in drinking habits (frequency or amounts consumed ), Change urination habits (frequency, color, smell). Change in skin ( redness,scabs, scratching).

http://www.aspca.org/site/DocServer/vetm0306_142-146.pdf?docld=9642
acetaminopen alone or with opioids,aspirin, cafeine and anti-histamines can cause facial and paw edema.

selenium overdose toxicity :vomiting,anorexia,nervousness,staggering gait, weakness and difficulty breathing.

drug and chemical toxicity .
Appreciate the side effects of each toxic mineral/vitamin that you have put on here - one would never associate this in the pet food. Great find, thx!
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yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2007, 05:20:19 PM »

Someinteresting thoughts from Dr.Michael W. Fox on these 2 web posts. as to raw feeding commericial foods toxins etc. http://www.tedeboy.tripod.com/drmichaelwfox/id81.html
http://www.tedeboy.tripod.com/drmichaelwfox/id88.html

Also interesting info on cadmium. Which is found in pet food. Cadmium is also used for rods and shields  in nuclear reactors, Ni-cd batteries, black and white tv's.
http://www.webelements.com/webelements/elements/text/Cd/uses.html
http://www.camb.org.uk/chemicals/compendium/cadmium/ProductionUses.htm
« Last Edit: September 17, 2007, 05:32:22 PM by yl » Logged
purringfur
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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2007, 12:30:36 PM »

Do you think it would help if people can post their pet's lab work (blood & urine) AND symptoms?

What Menusux & yl posted about the amino acids & heavy metals, coupled with the substances that cause the acquired form of the Fanconi Syndrome-like symmptoms (heavy metals, expired antibiotics, some drugs, etc.), can we try to list the symptoms for overdosing on each amino acid, drug, vitamin, heavy metal, etc. and come up with something?  Also, the acetaminophen & aminopterin.

When my dog was sick (died in Feb.), my vet gave him a vitamin K injection mentioning clotting problems and difficulty getting blood from him.  She knew he needed the vitamin K, but just couldn't come up with something more -- no poison ever in or around my house -- absolutely no ingestion.  Vitamin K is an antidote to anti-coagulant rat poisons.  (Remember the aminopterin that was found on March 23rd.)

I know my dog was making red blood cells, but they remained immature and distorted (damaged), and did not leave the bone marrow to circulate. 

Some people here have reported various types of anemia.  Some have reported bacterial urinary/bladder infections.  I keep reading that pets go into the vets and are diagnosed with bacteria in their urine and urinary tract infections.  My previous dog NEVER had bacteria in the urine...so why are all these reports around and what do they mean?  I've never heard of so many reports of infections...



« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 12:37:17 PM by purringfur » Logged

Buy local.  Buy organic.
If you ate today, thank a farmer, hopefully a small, local farmer.

Remember the thousands & thousands of pets that died to give US a wake-up call about the safety of ALL food and products.
yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2007, 12:42:53 PM »

Purringfur Ithink it is  a great idea! The more we can put on here the more we help others pets and the more we learn!!
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catbird
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« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2007, 01:01:49 PM »

If such a list can be put together (toxic substance possibly in food, what symptoms would be seen) I think I may be handing it out on the street corners.  People just don't know.

Excellent idea.
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purringfur
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« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2007, 02:27:59 PM »


Something else people are reporting on another site is blindness and/or aggression, possibly as a result being frightened of the blindness.

The heavy metal mercury can cause blindness. 

Merck Vet Manual - http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp

When reading about a horse going blind that was poisoned with rat poison, the vet treating the horse said the blindness could be related to the liver damage.
http://www.freevetadvice.co.uk/blindness.htm

Lead Poisoning:
http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/211800.htm
http://www.antechdiagnostics.com/clients/antechNews/1998/may98_02.htm

Hypercalcemia in Dogs & Cats - due to Vitamin D Overdose
http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/40403.htm

Other people have reported seizures in pets who were poisoned....

Others reported sudden diabetes - high glucose (similar to the Fanconi Syndrome-like symptoms - acquired form from heavy metals, some drugs, expired antibiotics, chemicals)
« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 03:42:14 PM by purringfur » Logged

Buy local.  Buy organic.
If you ate today, thank a farmer, hopefully a small, local farmer.

Remember the thousands & thousands of pets that died to give US a wake-up call about the safety of ALL food and products.
yl
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 252


« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2007, 03:17:07 PM »

This web site talks about one of the toxins I have seen mentioned on these forums before pcb's and the fact they cause cancer in humans and animals.

http://www.Politicalfriendster.com/showPerson.php?id=4270&name=Bayer-Cropscience   

Not related to the above according to fda  propylene Glycol generally recognized as safe as feed additive except in cat food.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2007, 03:25:23 PM by yl » Logged
JJ
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« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2007, 07:53:29 PM »

yl propylene glycol is a less toxic form of ANTI-FREEZE. It is now in store bought cakes, cookies, cake mixes, dog treats (read pkg of Bil-Jac liver treats-its on there) among hundreds of other food products, etc. Generally Recognized as Safe from the FDA - how much weight would one give that statement? Why anyone would ingest Propylene Glycol or feed it to your pets is beyond me. Safe for who - your cars radiator?
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Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2007, 07:26:32 AM »

JJ  Don't shoot the messenger Propylene Glycol  (S 582.1666)is listed as safe in their fda fda>cdrh>cfrtitle21 database search.It  states it is generally safe as a food additive accept in cat food. I can not get the fda link to copy correctly . I'll try again

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/cfrsearch.cfm 

if this linl works go to cfrtitle 21 food & drugs title 21 scroll down to 582 and then click the button at the bottom of the window it should take you to the list .There are 2 for propylene gylcol one is 582.1666 the other is 582.4666.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 08:01:21 AM by yl » Logged
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