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Author Topic: Premium Edge Cat food Voluntary Withdrawal  (Read 70000 times)
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catbird
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« Reply #105 on: December 02, 2009, 03:12:00 PM »

Hmm, Nutra Blend.  I wonder if they still use them.
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menusux
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« Reply #106 on: December 02, 2009, 03:13:14 PM »

I wonder who else does too.
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catbird
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« Reply #107 on: December 02, 2009, 03:14:58 PM »

Very good question.
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Sandi K
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« Reply #108 on: December 02, 2009, 04:24:59 PM »

Pet Food Express changed their website, they removed the post about the off-odor food and updated info on the Diamond recall due to thiamine deficiency....its sad to see PFE doing this.  Maybe it was all from the same recall but there is additional product listed that was not listed before...and they may not have sold any of this affected product but what about the next time? Whatever...as my dad used to say. People obviously tried to tell them.  Tongue

http://www.petfoodexpress.com/petfood/default.asp?pageid=99&Section=About
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Spartycats
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« Reply #109 on: December 03, 2009, 07:23:38 AM »

Apparently, one of the incentives to being a Nutra Blend customer, is a customer appreciation cruise.

http://www.nutrablend.net/nutraBlendHome.aspx

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Neosho/Nutra-Blend-Cruisers/154822471316
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Sandi K
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« Reply #110 on: December 03, 2009, 07:36:04 AM »

Good grief, "Nutra-Blend Cruisers?  Now, isnt that special.... Roll Eyes

how is it these companies keep saying they dont have enough money for good testing protocol but yet they can provide cruises? 
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Sandi K
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« Reply #111 on: December 03, 2009, 09:15:07 AM »

Susan Thixton has written a blog article about the discrepancies in the recent Diamond cat food recall info, at least the details are starting to be pointed out and talked about more:

http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/532/1/Just-a-warning-this-one-is-going-to-make-you-Mad/Page1.html

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JJ
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« Reply #112 on: December 03, 2009, 10:03:15 AM »

Thx for that link Sandik. There is a paragraph that stands out - Diamond testing did not find any lots of cat food that was deficient in thiamine, the FDA testing did find them.

This happened before but can't remember what company testing/vs. FDA testing it was. History repeating itself?
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bug
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« Reply #113 on: December 03, 2009, 10:24:15 AM »

I have to say, regarding testing, I've known for some time that a lot of PFCs do a certain type of testing that has not been acknowledged, yet, by the FDA. In speaking with one of the people at this particular lab, they told me that most of the PFCs use this as their sole test which can point to a general toxicity of a product. It is at that point that they may do further, more detailed testing, but who's going to make them? Nutritional testing is not part of this general test. I have a feeling that this may be why the FDA found the issue and they didn't.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2009, 12:43:35 PM by bug » Logged

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JJ
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« Reply #114 on: December 03, 2009, 10:32:49 AM »

bug if you read that paragraph it states that the FDA found deficiencies on same lots that Diamond did not. Not that they did more in-depth testing. Is that what you meant?
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bug
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RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #115 on: December 03, 2009, 12:42:01 PM »

JJ,

No. I probably didn't word that well. I meant that Diamond didn't catch it because the testing they do has nothing to do with the nutrient content of their food. They only do a general test for toxins and if nothing shows up there, they go ahead and ship the food out. The FDA did the necessary tests that found the actual problem because they did ALL of them. It's a lot cheaper to let someone else pay for the detailed testing and continue to pay for the very inexpensive general toxin test. Knowing that most of the PFCs use this test to make the claim that their food is safe, nutritional over or under-supplementation will continue to be a problem.
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My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
JJ
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« Reply #116 on: December 04, 2009, 12:22:41 AM »

bug correct me if this is not the case - I thought after the big 2007 downfall of the PFC from the melamine - that more stringent testing was in place of their food? Do you know if that is posted anywhere on here about the testing, whether more involved (pricier) or the basic (standard) test you spoke about? And would we have the names of companies and what type of tests they do so people could compare the testing of the foods?
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bug
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RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #117 on: December 04, 2009, 07:11:00 AM »

The testing for melamine is a separate issue. This particular test is one that is supposed to pick up dangerous levels of mycotoxins, heavy metals and other toxic compounds (maybe melamine has been included). It has been used for years, but it isn't what you think. It's not like they submit a sample to a lab and they add liquid and centrifuge and run it through a computer to find levels of such and such. I can't just come out and say it because of the confidentiality of the conversation I had with the person at the company. I also don't know all of the companies that use them, just one for sure (and I'll add that their food is produced in Gaston, SC) and in conversation, "a lot of pet food companies use us" was offered.

I don't know how many go beyond this testing, and it's not that I don't think the method works, it just hasn't been accepted and used by the FDA or higher educational institutions with labs. I haven't seen the studies on the methods, and they may be solid, but what concerns me is that this is a very general test which doesn't include nutritional (proximate) analysis. PFCs might be skipping on doing more sensitive tests in lieu of the more general one because, well, if nothing toxic turns up, then the food must be good to go.

Of course, this is all speculation on my part (about what PFCs might or might not do), but that line of thinking is a possibility and I wish there were strict guidelines on what kind of tests need to be done to deem a food safe.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 07:17:32 AM by bug » Logged

My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
Sandi K
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« Reply #118 on: December 04, 2009, 10:18:11 AM »

I thought Diamond did say they do nutrient testing....this is a post by Menusux in the Diamond Taste of the Wild recall thread.  It appears they have taken down the statement now about the testing they do (which that in itself is kind of interesting, why would they take that down)?  But this is what the said they do...incuding nutrient testing....and you remember the ol' bells and whistles thing and the 151 tests and checks...maybe they need to make it 152 to include thiamine?  Roll Eyes To me this is no different that the Nutro sky-high zinc problem...they all say they test nutrient levels but if they do, how come this sort of thing keeps happening...all we have to go on is what they tell us they do and they have certainly implied here that nutrient testing is done...altho that statement is now gone from what I can tell.....
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.diamondpet.com/promotions/5/

Committed to quality and safety
141 Ingredient Tests.
10 Final Product Checks.
Zero Compromises.

"This is our slogan for quality and consistency, but what does this really mean to you and your pet?

"Our ingredients and finished products undergo an extensive evaluation prior to leaving our facility as a bag of pet food. State of the art laboratories that make use of the newest technology for product analysis help us deliver quality to you in each and every bag.


"Each incoming ingredient has a list of specifications that it must meet. These ingredients are inspected as the truck comes into our facility. Depending on the ingredient, the specific tests that it undergoes will vary. However, all ingredients are inspected for smell, color, texture and purity. Most ingredients are also tested in a near infrared unit for nutrient content. This NIR measures levels of protein, fat, fiber, ash and moisture. The nutrient content is very important to ensure that the ingredients going into the recipe are of the utmost quality and provide the required nutrition to your pet.
"Some examples of tests that are run on specific ingredients include:
•    Peroxide level on fats, oils and protein meals
•    Aflatoxin test on corn, millet, rice
•    Vomitoxin test on wheat, barley
•    Fumonisin test on corn
•    General toxicity screening (Toxi-Screen) – detects harmful levels of any toxins present in the ingredient or finished product

"Samples are collected with a robotic arm, eliminating human influence from the sampling process.

"Although we thoroughly check each incoming ingredient, we don’t stop there. Computers are used to batch each recipe and alarms sound if there is any deviation from the precise recipe.

"Finished product testing is the final critical step in ensuring that the food that you feed to your pet is the best available. Samples are taken throughout the process and tested for level of cook (determined by appearance of the kibble and bushel weight), nutrient content (using the NIR technology), aflatoxin, and bacterial contamination. In addition, we use a special Toxi-screen test that checks finished product samples for any type of toxic contamination. The sealed bags pass through a metal detector prior to being stacked on a pallet. Because the system is automated and cameras are installed throughout the manufacturing facility, we can be confident that the food in each bag has been properly handled throughout the process.

"Once the product leaves our facility, unique identifiers enable us to track each batch of food through the marketplace. Production codes are used on every bag of food and are unique for the product, the plant where it was manufactured, the line on which it was manufactured, the operator who was in charge, and the time the food was put into the bag. The expiration date is another important part of this code. Tags are placed onto the pallets and scanned when the food is loaded onto a truck to be delivered to one of our distributors. Based on the information on the tag, we are able to track which batches went to which distributors. Many of our processes are based off the written protocols used in human grade facilities.  When our facilities are audited for quality and safety, the audit is the same as one that would be done in a human grade facility.  Although pet foods are not considered to be human grade, we hold ourselves to the standards as if they were".

"Many of our processes are based off the written protocols used in human grade facilities.  When our facilities are audited for quality and safety, the audit is the same as one that would be done in a human grade facility.  Although pet foods are not considered to be human grade, we hold ourselves to the standards as if they were."

 
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 10:38:12 AM by Sandi K » Logged
5CatMom
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« Reply #119 on: December 04, 2009, 11:38:38 AM »

If PFC's were testing what they claim to be testing (i.e., nutrients and toxins), testing representative samples, and testing at appropriate intervals - well, we wouldn't be seeing premix errors and moldy food.

In a well defined and properly controlled manufacturing process, it's not necessary to 100% test your product at every operation.  The fact that PFC's harp about all the testing they're doing tells me a couple of things:

1)  PFC processes are out of control.
2)  They're not really doing what they say they're doing.

5CM
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