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Author Topic: Pet food problems? FDA Emergency Report Number, November 2007  (Read 9215 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« on: November 16, 2007, 06:57:27 AM »

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/FDAVet2007VolXXIINo4.htm#7290

USE THE MAIN FDA EMERGENCY REPORT NUMBER IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS WITH PET FOOD.
REPORT EVERY ILLNESS OR DEATH RELATED TO PET FOOD TO THE FDA. THEY CAN'T IGNORE WHAT
HAS BEEN REPORTED FOREVER. MAKE SURE YOUR VETERINARIAN GETS THIS NUMBER
:

From the CVM November 2007 Veterinary Newsletter:
Recently Enacted FDA Amendments Act Has Major Food Safety Components
by Walt D. Osborne, M.S., J.D., Assistant Editor
 

The FDA Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) was signed into law by the President on September 27, 2007 (Public Law 110-085). Among its many provisions, the law reauthorizes and expands user fees for prescription human drugs and for medical devices. These programs are designed to ensure that FDA staff has the additional resources needed to conduct the complex and comprehensive reviews necessary to make new drugs and devices available to consumers. The new law also reauthorizes the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and the Pediatric Research Equity Act, both of which are designed to encourage more research into, and more development of, treatments for children.

Focus on food safety
Title X of the FDAAA imposes several requirements in the food safety arena. Many of these apply to human and pet food and generally deal with processing and ingredient standards, improved communication during an ongoing recall, and a mechanism for reporting food determined to be threatening to human or animal health.

According to the new law, the impetus behind enactment of the FDAAA was to increase the public’s confidence in the safety of the food supply.

Of major concern has been the increased amount of imported food, which now accounts for 13 percent of the average American diet, including 9.5 percent of red meat, and 78.6 percent of fish and shellfish. Also cited in the legislation is the decrease since 2003 in the number of full-time FDA inspectors.

In order to further enhance the safety of pet food, the new law directs that within 2 years the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) is to promulgate new regulations to establish ingredient standards and definitions, processing standards, and updated standards for labeling to include nutritional and ingredient information.

Early warning system and effective communications
The new law also requires that, within 1 year, an early warning and surveillance system be established in order to identify any adulteration incidents affecting the pet food supply and also to alert the public about any outbreaks of illness associated with pet food. To do this, the law instructs the Secretary of HHS to consider the use of surveillance and monitoring mechanisms already in place to monitor human or animal health (e.g., FoodNet, PulseNet, and FDA’s Food Emergency Response Network).

FDA has already taken several steps to improve communication about a pet food recall, including posting information about the recall on FDA’s Internet Web site in a single location.

 
Reportable Food Registry
By September 27, 2008, FDA is also directed to establish a “Reportable Food Registry” to which instances of “reportable food” would be submitted by the Agency via an electronic portal, based on reports submitted by food facilities (i.e., manufacturers, processors, packers) that have registered pursuant to Section 415(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. For purposes of this requirement, “reportable food” means an article of food (other than infant formula) for which there is a reasonable probability that use of it will cause serious adverse health consequences or death to humans or animals.

Generally, any reports about such foods are to be submitted to the registry no later than 24 hours after a firm has determined that the food item poses possible serious adverse health effects. However, the law says that no report would be required if the party with which the adulteration originated detected the adulteration prior to any transfer of it to another person and either corrected the adulteration or destroyed the adulterated product.

Also, the new legislation authorizes persons submitting these reports to include a statement to the effect that the submitter “denies” that the report or notification constitutes an admission that the product involved caused or contributed to a death, serious injury, or serious illness.

The new law delineates several follow-up actions after a report is submitted to the registry, and all responsible parties are instructed to
maintain records related to each report for 2 years. In addition, this law gives FDA 9 months to develop regulations and a guidance to
industry to implement the food registry. The guidance is to include specific information on how to submit the reports to the registry
via the electronic portal and how to provide the required notification to other persons in the supply chain about a suspect feed product
that poses a “reasonable probability” of causing serious adverse health consequences.


FDA Emergency Numbers


The Food and Drug Administration maintains a system of emergency phone numbers for complaints or concerns about any product FDA regulates.
The main number, which can be used to contact FDA headquarters, is 301-443-1240. Calls to that number go to FDA’s Office of Emergency Operations (OEO) during regular business hours, or to a Late Duty Officer volunteer at other times. All calls are returned.

Callers, in  many cases, should consider contacting their local Complaint Coordinator (see below). The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and each State has one (and California has two).

Dorothy Miller, OEO Director, said that the emergency numbers should be used only for FDA-regulated products, and not for medical emergencies. For medical emergencies, call 911.

MAIN FDA NUMBER (301) 443-1240
Here are the numbers of Complaint Coordinators:

 

Alabama............................... (866) 289-3399

Alaska................................... (425) 483-4949

Arizona................................. (949) 608-3530

Arkansas.............................. (214) 253-5200, ext. 5233

California (Northern)............ (510) 337-6741

California (Southern)............ (949) 608-3530

Colorado............................... (303) 236-3044

Connecticut.......................... (781) 596-7700

Delaware.............................. (215) 597-9064

District of Columbia.............. (410) 779-5713

Florida................................... (866) 337-6272

Georgia................................. (404) 253-1161

Hawaii................................... (510) 337-6741

Idaho..................................... (425) 483-4949

Illinois.................................... (312) 353-7840

Indiana.................................. (313) 393-8100

Iowa...................................... (913) 752-2440

Kansas.................................. (913) 752-2440

Kentucky.............................. (513) 679-2700, ext. 124

Louisiana.............................. 866-289-3399

Maine.................................... (781) 596-7700

Maryland.............................. (410) 779-5713

Massachusetts..................... (781) 596-7700

Michigan............................... (313) 393-8100

Minnesota............................. (612) 758-7221

Mississippi............................ 866-289-3399

Missouri................................ (913) 752-2440

Montana............................... (425) 483-4949

Nebraska.............................. (913) 752-2440

Nevada................................. (510) 337-6741

New Hampshire................... (781) 596-7700

New Jersey.......................... (973) 331-4917

New Mexico......................... (303) 236-3044

New York............................. (718) 340-7000, ext 5588

North Carolina...................... (404) 253-1161

North Dakota........................ (612) 758-7221

Ohio...................................... (513) 679-2700, ext. 124

Oklahoma............................. (214) 253-5200, ext. 5233

Oregon................................. (425) 483-4949

Pennsylvania........................ (215) 597-9064

Rhode Island........................ (781) 596-7700

South Carolina...................... (404) 253-1161

South Dakota....................... (612) 758-7221

Tennessee............................ 866-289-3399

Texas.................................... (214) 253-5200, ext. 5233

Utah...................................... (303) 236-3044

Vermont................................ (781) 596-7700

Virginia.................................. (410) 779-5713

Washington........................... (425) 483-4949

West Virginia........................ (410) 779-5713

Wisconsin............................. (612) 758-7221

Wyoming.............................. (303) 236-3044

Puerto Rico and

U.S. Virgin Islands................ (800) 332-0127

« Last Edit: November 16, 2007, 07:12:05 AM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
Offy
Guest
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2007, 07:29:47 AM »

Absolutely use those numbers!!!

According to dear Mr. Sellers, we cannot expect the pet food industry to use those avenues to report problems.

Also, thanks to dear Mr. Sellers, we know we MUST also include the state agencies (agriculture, health, etc) numbers and report to them along with the FDA/CVM- Don't use just the state FDA numbers.

Basically, they told us we'd have to do it ourselves...

Aren't we glad the PFI publication was so _______,  Grin
« Last Edit: November 16, 2007, 07:33:07 AM by Offy » Logged
Suelovescats
Guest
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2007, 08:14:04 AM »

Here is a link to your state vets. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/sregs/official.html
 
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3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2007, 08:30:56 AM »

Thanks very much for the link, Sue. Use these contacts, too, to report problems, and
don't accept the excuse I got from my state veterinarian early in the pet food recalls,
"the FDA is taking all those complaints." Perhaps it's changed now. Insist on filing a
complaint!
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Suelovescats
Guest
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2007, 08:51:17 AM »

3cat,
I've had this list for ages.  You can get contact info from these websites for all the various and sundry VMA's.  We have to advocate for the animals since no one else will. We must complain loudly. (I know, preaching to the choir.) 

Federal VMA

American – http://www.avma.org/


State VMA

List of states - http://www.avma.org/advocacy/state/vmas.asp


Regional VMA

Southern Arizona - http://www.savma.net/

Central Oklahoma - http://www.covma.org


County Level VMA

Broward County (FL) - http://www.bcvma.net

Harris County (TX) - http://www.hcvma.org/

San Diego County - http://sdcvma.org/

Seattle-King County - http://www.skcvma.org/

Dallas County - http://www.dallasvma.org/

Tarrant County (TX) - http://www.tcvma.com/

Whatcom, Skagit, Island and San Juan Counties. (WA) - http://mysite.verizon.net/reholt/


City Level VMA

Chicago - http://www.chicagovma.org/

Knoxville, TN - http://www.knoxvet.com/

El Paso - http://www.epvma.org/

New York City - http://www.vmanyc.org/

Kansas City - http://www.kcvma.com/


Canadian VMA

Canadian Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.canadianveterinarians.net/


Provincial VMA

Alberta Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.avma.ab.ca

British Columbia Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.bcvma.org

Calgary Academy of Veterinary Medicine - http://cavm.ab.ca

Manitoba Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.mvma.ca

New Brunswick Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.nbvma-amvnb.ca

Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.nsvma.ca

Ontario Veterinary Medical Association - http://ovma.org

Ordre des médecins vétérinaires du Québec - http://omvq.qc.ca

Prince Edward Island Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.peivma.com

Saskatchewan Veterinary Medical Association - http://www.svma.sk.ca

(We need to make these guys do their jobs, instead of sucking up to industry.)

Logged
Cathy
Full Member
***
Posts: 68

Hunter 4/9/01-4/11/07


« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2007, 10:06:08 AM »

I called the FDA numerous times in April to file a report, left messages, pleaded for them to return my call.  They never did.  I sure hope things have changed.
Logged

...he will be our friend for always and always and always.
Rudyard Kipling
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2007, 12:15:07 PM »

It took almost a month for them to call me back in April. I just kept repeating
that this was my second, third, fourth ... call and I wasn't going to quit at
the end of every call.
Logged
Suelovescats
Guest
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2007, 12:24:33 PM »

It is important to call AVMA and the state VMA, too.  They regularly fax info to vets (my vet says he gets stuff on Lyme disease and Avian flu).  We Itchmovians were miles ahead of our own vets on the recall. They weren't being told anything by those organizations.

 I finally heard from FDA after Ribble died and never heard from the state vet. 

Basically, I think we need to be pushy.  This is one of those never-again situations.  My innocence was lost, never to return.  We have to make staying the same very uncomfortable for them. 
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JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2009, 08:34:40 AM »

Here's a link to recent updates for Consumers to report food issues.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FoodSafetyPrograms/RFR/default.htm#who

Where Should Consumers, Food Retailers and Food Service Operators Report a Problem with Food?

In emergencies, consumers, food retailers and food service operators should continue to call FDA at 301-443-1240. For less urgent problems, contact the FDA consumer complaint coordinator in your geographic area or see Your Guide To Reporting Problems to FDA.

Consumer Complaint Coordinators
http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ConsumerComplaintCoordinators/default.htm

To report adverse reactions or other problems with FDA-regulated products, contact the FDA district office consumer complaint coordinator for your geographic area. If you require the use of a Relay Service, please call the Federal Relay Services (1-800-877-8339). This is a toll free relay service to call Federal agencies from TTY devices.

Please Note: There is not a Consumer Complaint Coordinator in each state. Consumer Complaint Coordinators are assigned by regions. Therefore, several states will have the same Consumer Complaint Coordinator assigned to it.

Updated 08/13/2009


Alabama--866-289-3399

Alaska--(toll free) 800-353-3965

Arizona--(949) 608-3530

Arkansas--(214) 253-5237

California (Northern)--(510) 337-6741

California (Southern)--(949) 608-3530

Colorado--(303) 236-3044

Connecticut-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

Delaware-- (toll-free) 877-689-8073

District of Columbia--(410) 779-5713

Florida -- (866) 337-6272

Georgia--(404) 253-1169

Hawaii-- 808-522-8011 x100

Idaho--(toll free) 800-353-3965

Illinois--(312) 353-7840

Indiana--(313) 393-8189

Iowa--(913) 752-2440

Kansas--(913) 752-2440

Kentucky--(513) 679-2700, ext. 124

  Toll-free in Kentucky: 800-437-2382

Louisiana--866-289-3399

Maine-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

Maryland--(410) 779-5713

Massachusetts-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

Michigan--(313) 393-8189

Minnesota--(612) 758-7221

Mississippi--866-289-3399

Missouri--(913) 752-2440

Montana--(toll free) 800-353-3965

Nebraska--(913) 752-2440

Nevada--(510) 337-6741

New Hampshire-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

New Jersey-- (973) 331-4917

New Mexico--(303) 236-3044

New York -- (toll-free) 866-446-9055

North Carolina--(404) 253-1169

North Dakota--(612) 758-7221

Ohio--(513) 679-2700, ext. 124

  Toll free in Ohio: 800-437-2382

Oklahoma--(214) 253-5237

Oregon--(toll free) 800-353-3965

Pennsylvania--877-689-8073

Rhode Island-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

South Carolina--(404) 253-1169

South Dakota--(612) 758-7221

Tennessee-- 866-289-3399

Texas--(214) 253-5237

Utah--(303) 236-3044

Vermont-- (toll-free) 800-891-8295

Virginia--(410) 779-5713

Washington-- (toll free) 800-353-3965

West Virginia--(410) 779-5713

Wisconsin--(612) 758-7221

Wyoming--(303) 236-3044

Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands--800-332-0127


Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2009, 08:48:01 AM »

Your Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA  (link to PDF file    http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/UCM143112.pdf)

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm

Consumers play an important public health role by reporting to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) any adverse events (unexpected side effects) after using a medical product, or other problems with any products that the agency regulates. Timely reporting allows the agency to take prompt action. There are a number of ways you can report problems to the agency, depending on the type of problem and product. The following tips and chart will help you make your report.


Tips for Reporting
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm#tips
1. Report what happened as soon as possible after you discover a problem. Be prepared with the following information:

names, addresses, and phone numbers of people affected
your name, postal and e-mail address, and phone number
name, address, and phone number of doctor or hospital if emergency treatment was provided
product codes or identifying marks on the label or container
name and address of store where product was bought and date of purchase
name and address of company on the product label
2. Do not discard the product packaging and labeling. They provide codes, numbers, and dates that will help FDA trace the product back to the plant.

3. In addition to reporting to FDA, the agency recommends reporting the problem to the manufacturer and to the store where the product was purchased.

4. When in doubt about how to report a problem, call your local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator.  http://www.fda.gov/Safety/ReportaProblem/ConsumerComplaintCoordinators/default.htm

Quick-Reference Chart for Reporting Problems to FDA

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm#chart


------------

Types of Problems FDA Doesn't Handle
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm#types
Contact the agencies listed to report or complain about the following problem areas. See your local phone directory for phone numbers not provided here.

restaurant food and sanitation—local or state health departments (check blue pages of your local phone book or find your state health department at www.cdc.gov/mmwr/international/relres.html)
unsolicited products in the mail—U.S. Postal Service at www.usps.gov
accidental poisonings—Poison Help at 1-800-222-1222 or local hospital
pesticides or air and water pollution—U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at www.epa.gov/tips/
hazardous household products (including toys, appliances, and chemicals)—U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission hotline at 1-800-638-2772 or see www.cpsc.gov/talk.html
alcoholic beverages—Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives at www.atf.gov/contact/hotlines.htm
drug abuse and controlled substances—U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration at www.usdoj.gov/dea/contactinfo.htm
hazardous chemicals in the workplace—U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration at www.osha.gov/html/Feed_Back.html
warranties—Federal Trade Commission helpline at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261 or see www.ftc.gov/ftc/contact.shtm
dispensing and sales practices of pharmacies—state board of pharmacy (available at National Association of Boards of Pharmacy at www.nabp.net)
medical practice—state certification board (check blue pages of your local phone book)

This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.

Updated: March 3, 2009

« Last Edit: September 08, 2009, 08:50:44 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Spartycats
Guest
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2009, 05:31:58 AM »

I just noticed this page, so thought it might be helpful to post it here.

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/SafetyHealth/ReportaProblem/ucm182403.htm


How to Report a Pet Food Complaint

To report complaints about pet food (and other animal feed), please contact your state’s FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinators. When reporting, provide the following information to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator.

We realize you may not have all the information requested below and we encourage you to report your complaint with whatever information you have available. 

Detailed Information about the Product

Consumers often transfer dry pet food into other containers for easier handling.  It is important to save the original packaging until the pet food has been consumed.  The packaging contains IMPORTANT information often needed to identify the variety of pet food, the manufacturer plant, and the production date. 

    * Exact name of the product and product description (as stated on the product label)
    * Type of container (e.g. box, bag, can, pouch, etc.)
    * Product intended to be refrigerated, frozen, or stored at room temperature
    * Lot number - This number is often hard to find and difficult to read.  It is stamped onto the product packaging and typically includes a combination of letters and numbers, and is always in close proximity to the expiration date (if the product has an expiration date).  The lot number is very important as it helps us determined the manufacturing plant as well as the production date.
    * Best by or expiration date
    * UPC code (also known as the bar code)
    * Net weight
    * Purchase date and exact location where purchased.
    * Results of any laboratory testing performed on the pet food product
    * How was the food stored, prepared, and handled?

 

Description of the problem with the product.  Examples include:

    * Foul odor, off color
    * Swollen can or pouch, leaking container
    * Foreign object found in the product. Describe.

 

If you think your pet has become sick or injured as a result of consuming a pet food product also provide the following information about your pet

    * Species (dog, cat, rabbit, fish, bird, other)
    * Age, weight, breed, pregnant, spayed/neutered
    * Previous health status of pet
    * Any pre-existing conditions your pet has
    * Do you give your pet any other foods, treats, dietary supplements or drugs?
    * How much of the product does your pet normally consume?

    * How much of the “suspect” product was consumed from the package?
    * How much product remains?
    * Clinical signs exhibited by your pet (examples: vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy)
    * How soon after consuming the product did the clinical signs appear?
    * Veterinarian’s contact information, diagnosis and medical records for your pet.
    * Results of any diagnostic laboratory testing performed on your pet
    * How many pets consuming the product exhibited clinical symptoms?
    * Are there any pets that consumed the product and are not affected?
    * Does your pet spend time outdoors unsupervised?
    * Why do you suspect the pet food caused the illness?

Page Last Updated: 09/16/2009
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