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Author Topic: CVM Update - Chicken Jerky products  (Read 12808 times)
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Offy
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« on: September 26, 2007, 09:50:45 AM »

http://www.fda.gov/cvm/CVM_Updates/Chknjerky.htm

Quote
September 26, 2007

FDA Cautions Consumers about Chicken Jerky Products for Dogs

The Food and Drug Administration is cautioning consumers of a potential association between development of illness in dogs and the consumption of chicken jerky products also described as chicken tenders, strips or treats.  FDA has received more than 70 complaints involving more than 95 dogs that experienced illness that their owners associated with consumption of chicken jerky products.

To date, FDA has not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses.  FDA has conducted extensive chemical and microbial testing but has not identified any contaminant.  Many of the illnesses reported may be the result of causes other than eating chicken jerky.

FDA has also received preliminary information from Banfield, The Pet Hospital which suggests an association between exposure to the chicken jerky products and signs of gastrointestinal illness (vomiting, diarrhea and bloody diarrhea).

Dogs that have become ill, typically show the following signs: decreased food consumption, although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods; decreased activity or lethargy; vomiting; diarrhea, sometimes with blood; and increased water consumption and/or increased urination.  Some or all of these signs may be present in any individual.  Blood tests may indicate kidney failure (increased urea nitrogen and creatinine).  Urine tests may indicate Fanconi syndrome (increased glucose).  Although most dogs appear to recover, some reports to the FDA have involved dogs that have died.

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MrsP
Guest
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2007, 10:00:11 AM »

Offy,
Thank you for posting this link.  I will report it on tomorrow's radio show.
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JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2007, 10:07:02 AM »

Thanks Offy.

This is for Fanconi syndrome that people can have, but the symptoms and causes are worth noting IMO.

http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec19/ch291/ch291c.html

Again, this link and paragraph is for PEOPLE.

Acquired Fanconi syndrome may be caused by various drugs, including certain cancer chemotherapy agents (eg, ifosfamideSome Trade Names
IFEX
MITOXANA
Drug Information
, streptozocin), antiretrovirals (eg, didanosineSome Trade Names
VIDEX
Drug Information
, cidofovirSome Trade Names
VISTIDE
Drug Information
), and outdated tetracyclineSome Trade Names
ACHROMYCIN V
TETRACYN
TETREX
Drug Information
. All of these drugs are nephrotoxic. It also may occur with renal transplantation, multiple myeloma, amyloidosis, intoxication with heavy metals or other chemical agents, or vitamin D deficiency.
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
straybaby
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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2007, 10:30:05 AM »

Banfield is also seeing problems?

i wonder if the fda plans on testing for heavy metals?

do these warnings go out with the recall alerts?
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Offy
Guest
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2007, 10:33:21 AM »

Straybaby,

I get updates from the CVM listserve. Somewhere on the CVM site is a place to sign up for them. I haven't looked to see if it was in recall stuff.

added:

Since I had looked intensely at copper sulfate, I'd like to add to the list of questionables here as well:

http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/f?./temp/~p7y7i8:15

Human Toxicity Excerpts :
/Kidney damage/ Copper causes a focal necrosis of the proximal tubule. The Fanconi syndrome-tubular proteinuria, generalized amino aciduria, phosphaturia, uricosuria, & hypercalciuria may result from the direct toxic effect of copper or the assoc hemolysis. Hemoglobinemia has been observed after ingestion ... of copper sulfate. /Copper/
[Ellenhorn, M.J., S. Schonwald, G. Ordog, J. Wasserberger. Ellenhorn's Medical Toxicology: Diagnosis and Treatment of Human Poisoning. 2nd ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 1997., p. 1555]**PEER REVIEWED**

That link may expire, but if you go there type fanconi in the search box and it will bring up a list for examination.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 10:45:16 AM by Offy » Logged
JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2007, 11:21:51 AM »

Has anybody found any reports of Fanconi syndrome in felines?  All I find is humans and canines.  I'm wondering if there is a connection here with renal failure.  Maybe I'm way off base, but renal disease is part of the Fanconi syndrome.
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Offy
Guest
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2007, 12:11:33 PM »

" although some may continue to consume the treats to the exclusion of other foods"

That is strange.  The FDA can't detect it and sick dogs seem to find it appetizing.  Sounds like the perfect poison, if it exists at all.

Sound similar to ingesting antifreeze... tastes good to them but it's poison.
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Offy
Guest
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2007, 01:10:33 PM »

Well, after a couple of short notes to FDA/CVM referring back to the dioxin like pcb contamination of the Alltech copper sulfate purchase from China, fanconi & antifreeze and getting a couple of obfuscated responses...was it ruled out by FDA in the jerky issues, etc.

I about fell out of my chair laughing when I received this last response from them:

"You said I could send any future e-mails to you.  She doesn't waste any time."

I guess I got forwarded to myself ROFLMAO  Wink or something  Wink



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menusux
Guest
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2007, 01:26:19 PM »

Has anybody found any reports of Fanconi syndrome in felines?  All I find is humans and canines.  I'm wondering if there is a connection here with renal failure.  Maybe I'm way off base, but renal disease is part of the Fanconi syndrome.

Here's what I found regarding other animals:

http://www.vetclick.com/news/view_article.php?ArticleId=24

Fanconi Syndrome is a renal tubular, high output, reasbsorption failure, which can be inherited or induced, and has been identified in many mammals. It is prevalent in certain canine breeds, such as Basenjis and Norwegian Elkhounds, but has been treated in a large number of other breeds, as well as cats, horses and in humans. Fanconi can affect the rodent pet population as well.

http://tinyurl.com/yvcqk7

Etiology of Fanconi Syndrome in Dogs & Cats

Inherited--

Idiopathic (AR in Basenjis)

Acquired--

Heavy metal poisoning (lead, mercury, cadmium, uranium)

Drugs (antibiotics, cisplatin, etc.)

Chemicals (ethylene glycol)

Hypoparathyroidism

Renal diseases
 
It appears that the common denominator in most of the inherited forms is that a toxin builds up in the tubular cells (e.g. cystinosis--cystine in lysosomes, Wilson’s disease-copper).  In the idiopathic forms, the presumed tubular toxin is unknown.  Because of the number of different transport mechanisms involved in Fanconi syndrome, it is likely that individual transporters themselves are affected. It is speculated that a generalized membrane defect exists (permeability theory), or alternatively, there is a defect in intracellular energy production or utilization (energy theory).  In experimentally induced Fanconi syndrome (maleic acid), decreased intracellular ATP has been noted. 


Clinical signs of Fanconi syndrome include polyuria and those secondary to electrolyte and bicarbonate losses.  In children and young animals, growth retardation and rickets may develop.  Idiopathic Fanconi syndrome often progresses to chronic renal failure.

At the first (VetClick) link there's an e-mail for a vet who's done a lot of work with Fanconi's--primarily with dogs, as it was most often seen as an inherited disorder, mostly in Basenjis, until recently.

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jerry1947
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« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2007, 03:41:19 PM »

My five year old mini Dachound is in intensive care at our Vet today.  We had been feeding her Waggin Train chicken jerky as treats.  Her symptoms are a 104 fever, lack of appetite, not drinking water, low white blood count and low platlets.  She is on an iv and is getting massive doses of antibotics.  After seeing the NBC news tonight and reading this forum, I am afraid that her illness is related to the chicken jerky treats.  Do any of the other pets have these same symptoms.

JOW
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menusux
Guest
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2007, 03:48:44 PM »

Welcome, Jerry--

Sure sorry you had to find us this way.  We've been working on a list of the various chicken jerky treats.  Here's the link to that thread--you will see various links to postings on other message boards which attribute the illness to WT and other brands.  Thread is 5 pages long, BTW.

http://itchmoforums.com/dog-food-experiences-by-brand/chicken-jerky-strips-from-china-t1693.0.html
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5CatMom
Guest
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2007, 04:00:01 PM »

jerry1947,

Very sorry to hear your dog is sick.  Can your vet test her urine for arsenic and her blood for lead?

5CatMom
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 04:04:16 PM by 5CatMom » Logged
yl
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Posts: 252


« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2007, 04:00:52 PM »

Jerry welcome sorry to hear about your sick dog. Can you tell us the name of the antibiotic your dog is on? I have a sick dog who is at home is on antibiotic called smz tmp 960 mg. My dog had diarhea with blood in it, increased urination . she has been lethargic and the vet feels it is food related. She is , since showing signs of illness , is getting  a vet prescribed food made by Purina.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 04:32:59 PM by yl » Logged
Offy
Guest
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2007, 04:11:34 PM »

jerry1947,

Very sorry to hear your dog is sick.  Can your vet test her urine for arsenic and lead?

5CatMom


One thing that is really bothering me is the copper and the glycols.. both have contaminated products - in toothpaste and copper w/dioxins from industrial grade metals in pet foods (but the dilution factor was used on that).. if the products were made in China, what are the odds that the contaminated copper, dioxins, the gylcols had no dilution factor to apply? Can't this contribute to a faster development of Fanconi? In combination how severe and immediate would the symptoms be expressed? Zinc issues - do they come into play here?

I think a copper toxicity test might be a good thing to ask about also. The one below is for humans, but a vet might be able to use the guides.

http://www.diagnose-me.com/cond/C514620.html

Quote
The best means of testing for copper toxicity are 24-hour urine copper or serum ceruloplasmin level tests. Red blood cell copper levels may be a good test to measure increased copper levels as well. Hair levels of copper are not very helpful in detecting increased body copper because of external contamination. If contamination is ruled out, hair copper is suggestive of body state.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 04:13:42 PM by Offy » Logged
straybaby
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WWW
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2007, 04:56:53 PM »

jerry1947,

Very sorry to hear your dog is sick.  Can your vet test her urine for arsenic and lead?

5CatMom


One thing that is really bothering me is the copper and the glycols.. both have contaminated products - in toothpaste and copper w/dioxins from industrial grade metals in pet foods (but the dilution factor was used on that).. if the products were made in China, what are the odds that the contaminated copper, dioxins, the gylcols had no dilution factor to apply? Can't this contribute to a faster development of Fanconi? In combination how severe and immediate would the symptoms be expressed? Zinc issues - do they come into play here?

I think a copper toxicity test might be a good thing to ask about also. The one below is for humans, but a vet might be able to use the guides.

http://www.diagnose-me.com/cond/C514620.html

Quote
The best means of testing for copper toxicity are 24-hour urine copper or serum ceruloplasmin level tests. Red blood cell copper levels may be a good test to measure increased copper levels as well. Hair levels of copper are not very helpful in detecting increased body copper because of external contamination. If contamination is ruled out, hair copper is suggestive of body state.

what about lead, cadmium and chromium? could they be using pigment to enhance the color? i'd be worried about cadmium if that were the case . . .  and lead. remember, we spray carbon monoxide on human meats here, so anything's possible there . . .
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