Itchmo Forums for Cats & Dogs Brought to you by Itchmo: Essential news, humor and info for cats, dogs and pet owners.
August 22, 2019, 09:59:38 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Go To Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.


Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Am Assoc of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians seeks samples, case reports  (Read 9958 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« on: July 04, 2007, 09:30:36 AM »

Why are there only 486 reported cases? My vet told me she knew of three effected households in her practice. A total of 486 reports nationally? Tell your vet. Something is not right here! Are we all delusional that we have dead or sick fur-kids? Excuse me, but where are the reporting veterinarians???
3cats


http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/jul07/070715c_pf.asp
AAVLD continues to seek samples, case reports
Back
 
The American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians encourages AAVLD laboratories, along with other laboratories and private practitioners in the United States and Canada, to continue sending samples and reporting cases of nephrotoxicosis possibly associated with adulterated pet food, using the Web-based survey tool it launched in April.

The survey is accessible to AAVLD laboratories on the members-only area of the Web site, www.aavld.org. Nonmembers can enter case data via the public area by clicking on News and then on AAVLD Pet Food Toxicity Survey.

Dr. Barbara Powers, AAVLD president and director of the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, said that the survey goal is to distinguish true cases of nephropathy unique to this recall, resulting in criteria that define a true case.

"So far, the survey has 486 cases posted, and those data are under review and analysis," Dr. Powers said. "Considering the many entries, that will take some time. Any cases that do not meet the criteria for further investigation will be excluded.

"A few late occurrences of renal failure have been reported, related perhaps to earlier exposure to the contaminated pet food. It will be valuable to receive any other such reports so that we may document them as possible late effects of pet food-associated nephrotoxicosis."

The data will be made available to the Food and Drug Administration for its investigations and will form the basis for a retrospective study to be presented at the AAVLD convention in October.

Veterinarians who want to submit relevant samples can go to www.aavld.org and click on Accreditation to access a list of AAVLD-accredited diagnostic laboratories, or contact a state veterinary diagnostic laboratory, veterinary teaching hospital, or veterinary laboratory with which they have a professional relationship and inquire about sample submission.
 
 
Return to top

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AVMA Home | Privacy Notice | About the AVMA | RSS feeds 

AVMA Journals | JAVMA News | Discussion Groups | Professional Issues

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

American Veterinary Medical Association
Copyright © 2007
 
« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 01:44:31 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2007, 09:55:44 AM »

The data will be made available to who? What a laugh-we know how they feel about all of this pet food and the recall. When any place feels there is no need to do anything about it why send anything to them? It will just sit someplace and you will never hear from them again. Whoever and whomever on here wants information to 'gather' for a study (and what determines the length of how long that could take if it ever really existed to be done in the first place) I'm finding hard to stomach as all of a sudden they are just popping up to 'help us Itchmo's' on here? Not a one of them has gone on tv nationwide or put out announcements in any print media -can't speak for radio but think not there either. If these people are real where are your credentials that speak volumes out in the public eye instead of hiding yourselves on this forum and probably others too. Itchmo's be careful in what you tell these people as they could be lawyers or reps from companies protecting themselves and gathering information to use in case of a lawsuit and use it against you if it came down to that.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2007, 10:39:42 AM »

Maybe some vets need reminding their oath is not to the PFI. Remind yours. Who is making this decision it is or is not food-related?
3cats


http://www.avma.org/careforanimals/animatedjourneys/aboutvets/aboutvets.asp
What is a Veterinarian?   Top

Doctors of Veterinary Medicine are medical professionals whose primary responsibility is protecting the health and welfare of animals and people.

Veterinarians diagnose and control animal diseases, treat sick and injured animals, prevent the transmission of animal diseases ("zoonoses") to people, and advise owners on proper care of pets and livestock. They ensure a safe food supply by maintaining the health of food animals. Veterinarians are also involved in wildlife preservation and conservation and public health of the human population.

Today's veterinarians are members of an important health profession. In taking the veterinarian's oath, a doctor solemnly swears to use his or her scientific knowledge and skills "for the benefit of society, through the protection of animal health, the relief of animal suffering, the conservation of animal resources, the promotion of public health, and the advancement of medical knowledge."

Today more than 67,000 veterinarians are professionally active in the United States. They provide a wide variety of services in private clinical practice, teaching, research, government service, public health, military service, private industry, and other areas.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

VETERINARIAN'S OATH (Adopted by the AVMA in November, 1999)   Top



Being admitted to the profession of veterinary medicine, I solemnly swear to use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society through the protection of animal health, the relief of animal suffering, the conservation of animal resources, the promotion of public health, and the advancement of medical knowledge.

I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity, and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics.

I accept as a lifelong obligation the continual improvement of my professional knowledge and competence.
 

« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 01:46:14 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2007, 11:42:07 AM »

Arabiannikki - Let's assume that I believe most vets are conscientious and honest. Let's assume that a lot
of us who own kidney failure "fur-kids" honestly asked our vets what could have caused this condition to
occur and our vets told us it was most probably food exposure. I'm sure more than 486 pet parents had this
conversation with their medical advisers/treating veterinarians. And then the vets don't report it to the
powers-that-be, but the pet parents don't know that, nor are the pet parents aware of who the vets
have been asked to report it to. It's the lack of follow-through reporting and the small numbers
of reports nationally that are bothering me based on the above article. I just can't believe only 486
pet parents truthfully asked for and received the veterinary opinion that it was recalled food that caused
or contributed to their family member's problem.
3cats
Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2007, 11:44:13 AM »

Arabiannikkii so you feel something else besides the food is making our pets ill and killing them? Pray tell what do you think it may be? Where are these pets getting this from other than the food? Would love to have you list exactly and in what amounts this 'other' is making them sick and slowly killing them. Obviously you need to elaborate on that comment, big time.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2007, 01:53:05 PM »

Vets of good conscience, I know you're out there. If the onset of symptoms was in the
right time period, report it. Couldn't old age and bad food have combined in a kidney failure
result? How many pets did you really treat for kidney failure from November 2006
to date, July 2007? 17,000+ calls to the FDA; 486 reports to AAVLD. What
are the standards being applied? Why couldn't I find that on the internet?
3cats
Logged
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2007, 03:31:06 PM »

Well, I think I found the standards after a couple of hours of internet digging:
http://www.oregonvma.org/news/menufoodsdvm.asp#testing

One set of standards applies if your cat/dog just became ill. Melamine crystals,
as I understand it from speaking with a doctor at UC Davis, are fairly rapidly excreted (exact
time period not specified). So unless a urinalysis  for melamine crystals is done within a short period
of the onset of symptoms or you continued to feed your pet contaminated food, you probably will not
meet the AAVLD criteria. If your family member has been ill for a while and had food switched to a melamine-
free diet, you probably will not meet the criteria. If you lost your pet before April 6, 2007, when this
reporting procedure was established, it was impossible for you to meet these standards as I don't believe
anyone was testing for melamine, were they?
I guess what I'm trying to say badly as a pet parent is, if these are the criteria to be used, how reflective
would the reporting results be of the numbers of pets who became ill from contaminated food? I wonder.
3cats


"Report Cases: AAVLD Survey
Courtesy of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The AAVLD Veterinary Analytical Toxicology Committee is seeking data on cases that meet certain
criteria. Through the a Web-based survey that was launched April 6, the AAVLD will gather scientific
data from diagnostic laboratories and—directly and indirectly— from veterinarians on cases of possible
pet food-induced nephrotoxicosis. The organization is asking AAVLD laboratories, along with other
laboratories and private practitioners who wish to participate, to report incidents in the United
States and Canada using this survey tool.

The survey is accessible to AAVLD laboratories on the members-only area of the Web site, www.aavld.org.
Nonmembers can enter case data via the public area by clicking on News and then on AAVLD Pet Food Toxicity Survey.

Cases should meet two of the following four criteria:

known exposure to one of the recalled pet foods
histologic lesions consistent with crystal-induced tubular nephrosis (pictures are posted on the AAVLD Web site)
urinalysis with crystals (also posted on the site)
chemical confirmation of the presence of melamine or other marker chemicals in pet food, tissues, or urine

Drs. Wilson Rumbeiha and Dalen Agnew at the Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and
Animal Health are coordinating the survey. Dr. Brent Hoff of the Animal Health Laboratory at the University
of Guelph is a collaborator.

In a post-survey follow-up, pathologists will review cases in which association with adulterated pet food is
questionable, including those meeting the least number of criteria.

Dr. Barbara Powers, AAVLD president and director of the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic
Laboratory, said that the survey goal is to distinguish true cases of nephropathy unique to this recall,
hopefully resulting in a set of criteria defining a true case.

Other survey objectives are to characterize the spectrum of lesions; the temporal and geographic distributions
of the suspected intoxications; the species, breeds, and ages of affected animals; and when possible, the brands,
lot numbers, and UPC numbers of pet food involved in the toxic exposure, and results of chemical analyses.

The data will be made available to the FDA for its investigations and will form the basis for a retrospective
study to be presented at the AAVLD meeting in October."


« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 07:24:36 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2007, 09:57:43 PM »

Arabiannikkii so you feel something else besides the food is making our pets ill and killing them? Pray tell what do you think it may be? Where are these pets getting this from other than the food? Would love to have you list exactly and in what amounts this 'other' is making them sick and slowly killing them. Obviously you need to elaborate on that comment, big time.

Every time I post something unemotional someone goes off on another thing about what I think. I guess I will clarify myself again. I NEVER said it was not the food. BUT, there are cases NOT related to food. There has been for centuries. The vets and the labs have to sort that out. They have to figure all this out and report it. If your vet doesn't report it than unfortunately it goes unreported or you push to get it done. When all is said and done our pets are our responsibility. Unfortunately there are idiots out there poisoning them. We can do the best we can, call all we can and push our vets to do what they need to do. Bitching back and forth does nothing and armchair chanting does nothing. Be proactive and push for what you want. Its the only thing you can do. So please try not to read things in my posts that are not there.
Just that you do not provide any links or proof to make it more than saying the food didnt cause all the cases. Please state other than the food then what did this to the pets? That was all I wanted you to list as to where you got this information from? I have been asked the same thing by people on Itchmo so dont feel its just you and someone is picking on you as that is not the case. Just provide something to back that kind of statement up with regarding it not being the food. That is how this whole thing started with the food and for someone to come along and say it cant all be because of the food would warrant something for the pet lovers to check on, look at other things. But since we only give them food and water then what else could have done this is all we want to know.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
Laurie
Guest
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2007, 03:40:31 AM »

  Arabiannikki, I have seen this also. I was at the vet one time and a man brought in an older cat because it kept peeing on the carpet. Vet said it might be a thyroid problem so a blood test was done which confirmed it. Vet then described to the owner the course of treatment. The owner decided to just have the cat put down. I was horrified! I had to go out of the office for awhile. It upsets me now just thinking about it.
Logged
JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2007, 04:50:31 AM »

JMHO.  Another point, I think probably many, many cases occured prior to when the actual recalls started.  This was back when the vets had no clue of what was going on.  They were blindsided by this, just like we were.  In those cases, vets were stumped why so many cats, in particular, were going into acute renal failure.  I've had dogs and cats die of renal failure over the last 30 years, but these were OLD animals, and it was "chronic" never "acute" failure.  "Acute" failure is of rapid onset, "chronic" is over a period of time.  As far as the "acute" cases, I think a lot of people could not afford to have diagnostic tests done, did not even realize their animals were sick until it was too late (it happened so quickly), or just didn't feel it was worth it to pursue further.  Then, you have millions and millions of pet owners who don't take care of their pets other than feeding them.  How many of them died?

Don't forget, Banfield early on came up with statistics of
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18029173/
Banfield pet hospital says 3 out of every 10,000 cats and dogs developed kidney failure.

The hospital chain saw 1 million dogs and cats during the three months when the more than 100 brands of now-recalled contaminated pet food were sold. It saw 284 extra cases of kidney failure among cats during that period, or a roughly 30 percent increase, when compared with background rates.

And Antech Laboratories reported in their June news that:  At Antech's laboratories, these round, yellow crystals from urine sediment have been seen in 20-30 cases a day, however the numbers of urine samples containing these crystals are rapidly decreasing. Now we see less that 10 a day. Follow up on these cases revealed that these dogs and cats have been on the recalled diets.
If they were found in 20-30 cases a day for just one month, that is 600-900 cases right there just in one month.

Why these aren't being reported or don't qualify to be reported baffles me.

I remember talking to my vets soon after the first recalls, and they were mad, mad that they were not even in the loop until after the recalls were announced.
Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Laurie
Guest
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2007, 05:06:08 AM »

  JJ, I think the point that Arabiannikki is trying to make is that not ALL pet illnesses or deaths are 100% food related. He is not denying that the poisoned food sickened and killed thousands of animals. Just that sometimes it may be difficult for a vet to distinguish between when it is food related or that the animal just developed the disease. It was the sudden increase in illness's that alerted the vets. Some got sick quickly while others took longer before they developed symptoms or died. Without testing every food each sick animal ate you cannot be certain. Unless of course the animal was fed one of the known foods to have contained the toxins. It cannot be said that every animal that develops or died from CRF ate poisoned food. Diet may be a contributing factor, but the animal may have already been predisposed to it. 
« Last Edit: July 05, 2007, 05:14:22 AM by Laurie » Logged
JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2007, 08:24:31 AM »

We will NOT do convenience euthanasia. Some vets do. I refuse. If they don't do the test and ask us to euthanize we say no. We offer to have them sign the animal over to us and we find a home or they have to go somewhere else.
That is good to hear, that you and your vet refuse.  My vets do the same.  Wish they all did.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2007, 08:26:46 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2007, 09:17:09 AM »

Leaving aside the whole issue of "convenience euthanasia" or the heatbreak of pet parents who can't afford treatment, that was
never really my point. My concern is the issue of a seeming or possible lack of veterinarian reporting. I think you can assume most Itchmo Readers think of their pet as a family member adopted for life to the best of their ability.

Can you point me to accurate, published morbidity (cause of death) statistics from June of 2006 to the present date, July 2007, on causes of death among cats and dogs that have been reported by veterinarians? I recall being told that kidney failure among cats was the number three cause of death (whatever the cause of the condition). If that's accurate, I would really like to know if there has been an increase or decrease and if veterinarians have been reporting kidney failure deaths and to whom.

Thanks for information,
3cats
Logged
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2007, 09:18:00 AM »

Wow, all, no one knows how or where their veterinarian/medical advisor reports information on small animal practice
health? No one has every seen any website that records such statistics for their state or nationally? I'm trying to
follow Arbiannikki's advice and keep emotion out of this and just ask for facts that would indicate vets are
participating, too. Thank you if you have information --
3cats
Logged
JustMe
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 10517


My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2007, 10:36:35 AM »

I don't know, but I was thinking it might be a good idea for each of us next time we bring one of our pets in for a check-up, etc., maybe we should ask our vets the following questions and report any findings here.

1.  How many cases have you seen of pets sickened from tainted food recall?

2.  Where and to whom do you have to report these cases?
Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Copyright 2007 Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines | Sitemap