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Author Topic: Eat Crap Why Americans should ingest more excrement Slate Magazine  (Read 4865 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: October 09, 2007, 11:39:04 PM »

Here's one for the books from Slate Magazine. 3cats

http://www.slate.com/id/2175569/

Eat Crap
Why Americans should ingest more excrement.
By Kent Sepkowitz
Posted Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2007, at 2:53 PM ET
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


One year ago, the now-famous E. coli outbreak arising from contaminated spinach rattled the natural-food industry and gave carnivores a moment of schadenfreude. The story had the heartbreaking elements we have come to dread: A young child eats something mundane and dies a horrid death. Boom, gone. I have (unsuccessfully) treated one such case and rate it as perhaps the most chilling moment of my career.

Since then, the United States has seen at least four additional food-borne outbreaks: salmonella in peanut butter and in spinach, botulism in canned chili, and the current Topps Meat Co. recall of 21.7 million pounds (40,000 cows' worth) of E. coli-tainted ground beef. Those with an insatiable interest in E. coli O157:H7 (along with the lawyers who traffic in this corner of the human misery market) can keep up-to-date here.

With every outbreak, the same question sounds: Why can't we keep the food chain clean? The annual numbers aren't small, nor are they decreasing. By one estimate, about one-fourth of Americans get "food poisoning" of some type each year, 300,000 are hospitalized, and a few thousand die. The perps remain the same—E. coli, listeria, salmonella, and all the rest. Why is this public-health problem so difficult to solve? This is America, after all, replete with wondrously harsh chemicals that can kill anything. Why can't we scrub away the bacteria our guts don't get along with?

Maybe we are taking the wrong approach. Rather than trying to make our food and water ever cleaner, we should focus instead on making sure it's dirty enough to assure our good health.

(read the rest at:  http://www.slate.com/id/2175569/)

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EricV
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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2007, 04:26:22 AM »

I've thought this same thing for a long time. These different bacterias harm humans so much, but leave dogs, cats, etc. relatively unharmed, and all because we've sterilized our food to the point of intolerence.
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lesliek
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« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2007, 05:13:46 AM »

I agree.Think about how our grandparents stored food,sausages etc packed in a jar of fat. Yet they didn't seem to get food poisoning too often.I store almost everything thats open in the fridge,they kept it all in the basement. Yet it didn't seem to go bad.
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carolo
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2007, 10:56:16 AM »

I agree.Think about how our grandparents stored food,sausages etc packed in a jar of fat. Yet they didn't seem to get food poisoning too often.I store almost everything thats open in the fridge,they kept it all in the basement. Yet it didn't seem to go bad.

One set of my grandparents made their living from their large farm.  My cousin and I spent part of our summers visiting them (I lived many states away) and no family member ever got ill while visiting, nor were either of my grandparents ever sick.  They didn't even have a refridgerator!  They had an "icebox."  Otherwise food was stored in a root cellar, home canned, or in the case of beef, there was the meat locker "in town."  Neighbors were spread far and wide, but they had frequent picnics.  The family hosting would provide usually the meat to be cooked out, while others brought dishes prepared at home.  I don't recall even one instance of anybody being sick from food served at those gatherings, and believe me, with all the work to be done on a farm daily, if anyone was ill, we'd have known it.  There was the occasional childbbirth or accident, and immediately neighbors would see to it that livestock were tended, and if crops needed anything, that would be handled as well.  But no food bourne illness that I can ever recall!  The soaps were simple.  None of today's "disinfect your kitchen surface" spray on products.  BTW, that grandfather lived to be a healthy 103 yr old.  So at the age of 103, he fell, broke his hip, was hospitalized for a couple of days.  Decided he wanted out of there and talked an orderly into helping him into a corset.  Then he put on his clothes, boots and all and walked out of that hospital on his own.  He passed on quickly, peacefully on his way to his pickup truck parked in the hospital parking lot!  (He had somehow managed to get to his truck and drive himself into town after that fall.  I don't think they make 'em, meaning grandfathers, like they used to!)  Never got ill at either grandparents' home.  We ate differently in those days but lived without the modern conveneinces of freezers and food storage containers, disinfectants.  Food was never irradiated, etc. 

We managed quite well without genetically engineered crops, too.  Check out the latest on corn and our aquatic ecosystems.  (sorry, bit off topic)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071008171030.htm

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dingbat
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That which does not kill us makes us stronger


« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2007, 06:44:12 PM »

To quote Al Bundy from the canceled series 'Married with Children'

"You have to be like the roach, eat crap and you can survive a nuclear holocaust"

db
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I used to think that anyone doing anything weird was weird. I suddenly realized that anyone doing anything weird wasn't weird at all and it was the people saying they were weird that were weird.
mainecoonpeg
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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2007, 06:47:22 PM »

db is back!! Cheesy

All is right with the world again.......except for all the poisonous cr*p from afar Angry
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Trudy
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« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2007, 06:54:19 PM »

I haven't read all the links yet, but back then there wasn't all this "crap" put into and onto our food in the first place. food was food. Not chemecals. And the cows, pigs, and chickens ran around in the sunshine and ate what they should.
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