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Author Topic: Home-Prepared Dog and Cat Diets, 2nd Edition Patricia Schenck 2010  (Read 13460 times)
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Sandi K
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« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2011, 12:18:21 PM »

5cat, is this her?  http://pathobiology.msu.edu/people/schenck.html
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Mark T
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« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2011, 02:19:36 PM »

Sandi, yes, that does appear to be her judging from cross referencing her name in search engines and also this page, at the bottom:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Home-Prepared-Dog-and-Cat-Diets/Patricia-Schenck/e/9780813801193#TABS


Who volunteers to email her? Smiley
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5CatMom
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« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2011, 03:00:00 PM »

Thanks for the info.  I'll contact Dr. Schenck and try to get clarification.

I seem to remember that "baking soda" may be made from several different active ingredients (sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate).  In baking, it's the "carbonate" which produces CO2 bubbles and causes the batter to rise.    

The active ingredient in my Arm & Hammer baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, but health food stores sell a baking soda product which contains calcium carbonate as the active ingredient.  Sometimes, these are referred to as a baking soda substitute.

Here's an example:
http://www.supplementwarehouse.com/viewitem.asp?idproduct=151449

Just guessing, but Dr. Schenck may be saying that her recipes require the calcium carbonate form of baking soda - possibly to avoid the addition of extra sodium.

Edit:  LOL, adding more info after reading the Arm & Hammer box Grin.

Hugs,

5CM
« Last Edit: January 07, 2011, 01:00:04 PM by 5CatMom » Logged

What is man without the beasts? If the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts, soon happens to man. All things are connected - - - Chief Seattle

We are the caretakers of our creatures . . . the peacekeepers of our planet
JJ
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« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2011, 07:27:59 PM »

Would be nice if this was like the info pet stores use to notify customers about a recall or problem w/a food if each person who bought the book could be contacted  about the error. As one poster on the amazon link said they question the whole book because of the continual claiming of the baking soda as calcium carbonate.
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Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
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5CatMom
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« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2011, 01:59:38 PM »

Thanks for the info.  I'll contact Dr. Schenck and try to get clarification.

I seem to remember that "baking soda" may be made from several different active ingredients (sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, calcium carbonate).  In baking, it's the "carbonate" which produces CO2 bubbles and causes the batter to rise.    

The active ingredient in my Arm & Hammer baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, but health food stores sell a baking soda product which contains calcium carbonate as the active ingredient.  Sometimes, these are referred to as a baking soda substitute.

Here's an example:
http://www.supplementwarehouse.com/viewitem.asp?idproduct=151449

Just guessing, but Dr. Schenck may be saying that her recipes require the calcium carbonate form of baking soda - possibly to avoid the addition of extra sodium.

Edit:  LOL, adding more info after reading the Arm & Hammer box Grin.

Hugs,

5CM

Email sent.

5CM
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What is man without the beasts? If the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts, soon happens to man. All things are connected - - - Chief Seattle

We are the caretakers of our creatures . . . the peacekeepers of our planet
Sandi K
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« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2011, 02:13:02 PM »

Thanks for sending that, 5cat!  It ought to be interesting to see if you hear back and what she says.
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5CatMom
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« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2011, 02:22:53 PM »

You're welcome Grin.
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What is man without the beasts? If the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts, soon happens to man. All things are connected - - - Chief Seattle

We are the caretakers of our creatures . . . the peacekeepers of our planet
Mark T
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« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2011, 02:13:47 PM »

Has anyone reviewed or used the recipes in this book?  They are also online on the publisher's website. You will need Excel to open them.

http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0813801192,descCd-DOWNLOAD.html
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5CatMom
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2011, 06:30:26 AM »

So far, no response to the email that I sent to Dr. Scheneck regarding "baking soda".
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What is man without the beasts? If the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit. For whatever happens to the beasts, soon happens to man. All things are connected - - - Chief Seattle

We are the caretakers of our creatures . . . the peacekeepers of our planet
Mark T
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****
Posts: 365


« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2011, 07:25:13 AM »

I hope she replies.

I have spent a couple of hours reading the book and the online recipes and I found other errors and poor advice that could be dangerous to the health of a pet.

The vitamin supplementation used is children's vitamins. If you look at the ingredients in kid's vitamins the first or second is a natural or synthetic sweetener used to make the vitamin more palatable. Common sweeteners used are zylitol, aspartame, stevia, and sorbitol, none of which have a place in pet food. I saw no mention in the book to avoid kids vitamins containing zylitol which is known to be toxic to dogs: http://www.healingspringsanimalhospital.com/2006_08.htm  Stevia is said to cause renal problems in cats.

Also, bone meal is suggested as another source of calcium. From my reading over the years, bone meal is discouraged for pet food. It is a product of animal rendering and as such is considered an unreliable source of calcium. It often contains high levels of fluoride and heavy metals. There are bone meal supplements that claim to be pure but I think there are better choices available like ground eggshell.

I would not use tofu (soy) for my cats as I believe they should have meat as the protein source.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2011, 07:29:21 AM by Mark T » Logged
JJ
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« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2011, 11:31:29 PM »

Mark T thanks for your updates. Hoping no one cooks any of these recipes for their pet. Artificial sweeteners and kids vitamins - sure this is about pets and not human home prep? Still would not give my kid aspartame - read that may cause brain lesions, sorbitol:
Adverse medical effects

Sorbitol also may aggravate irritable bowel syndrome,[13] and similar gastrointestinal conditions, resulting in severe abdominal pain for those affected, even from small amounts ingested.

Overdose effects

Ingesting large amounts of sorbitol can lead to abdominal pain, gas, and mild to severe diarrhea.[citation needed] Sorbitol ingestion of 20 grams (0.7 oz) per day as sugar-free gum has led to severe diarrhea leading to unintended weight loss of 11 kilograms (24 lb) in a woman originally weighing 52 kilograms (110 lb); another patient required hospitalization after habitually consuming 30 grams (1 oz) per day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorbitol#Adverse_medical_effects

cats with digestive issues sounds like they could be severly affected by this.

Was this book not proof read or facts checked before publication...............
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merrihart
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« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2011, 06:00:16 AM »

It obviously did not go up before a peer review, or if it did, they knew nothing of nutrition.  I've been staying away from aspartame  for years now, because it leeches calcium out of the bones (and yeah, it's been linked to lesions in the brain).

And even I, in my naivete, know not to give kids vitamins to anything not a kid (of the human variety).
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JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2011, 06:23:07 AM »

Thanks for all the information on this book, Mark T.  I had considering purchasing it as an update to my copy of Dr. Strombeck's book. Not anymore.  I'm really appalled at this.  I didn't know about the stevia connections with renal problems. 

JJ,  you're spot on about the artificial sweeteners possibly aggravating the condition of those with intestinal disorders.  Can't have any artificial sweeteners myself because of this.  Sometimes they sneak them into store-baked goods. 

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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
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JJ
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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2011, 11:59:31 PM »

JM yes aspartame or acesulfame, splenda is in just about everything from soda, flavored waters to gum and other foods. Wondered if it would also cause acid reflux since it causes intestinal issues?
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merrihart
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2011, 06:15:50 AM »

splenda is sucralose, nutrasweet is aspartame.

confusing isn't it?  so far, tmk, splenda has not been linked to any health side affects, but I"m sure it's coming.  Taste wise, I just don't like the stuff.

Splenda can act as a laxative in humans.
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