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Author Topic: DOGS: Recipes and Questions for Home Prepared Dog Food  (Read 32053 times)
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Katie
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« Reply #30 on: July 01, 2008, 01:33:49 PM »

Don, thank you! my zip loc bags are loose in the freezer - I never thought about a box. You are very organized.

Petslave, thank you for the Yahoo group site. I'd been using some of the others but they are very much into raw feeding.

Katie
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petslave
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« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2008, 08:56:58 PM »

kaffe - that chart gives Vit A in RE units instead of IU.  I had never heard of that before, so I typed it in in google, and it showed me how to convert since all the supplements and nutrition counters have IU on them:

http://www.dietpower.com/help/glossary/international_units_of_vitamin_a.htm
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kaffe
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« Reply #32 on: July 01, 2008, 10:07:34 PM »

Yes, Petslave --- Menusux reminded me that "RE" means "Retinol Equivalent"  --- I thumped my head becuase I have seen "RE" a thousand times looking at nutritional data...   Cheesy

OK --- so, can you find out if the Vit A you have in your chart is in mcg (micrograms)?


So, according to your link:  To convert micrograms RE to IUs: multiply the micrograms RE by ten for a food of plant origin, by five for a food of animal origin. The result is the approximate number of IUs in the food.

669.85   RE  x  5  = 3349.25IU 

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petslave
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« Reply #33 on: July 01, 2008, 11:15:38 PM »

This is funny, we are jumping back & forth between freezer storage & RE/IU units.  Hey, it's all good   Grin

kaffe, your calcs look right as far as I can tell.  The number I listed in that post was recommended daily requirements for my 70lb dog, and it just said RE for the units. But that link said RE is micrograms RE, not sure if that means anything of importance.

So I guess if I wanted to give the Vit A as pumpkin, I would use the plant mulitplier of 10 for the listed RE number.  That would give me the IU number to try for in adding pumpkin.  I would have to look up pumpkin in one of the nutritional counters to see how much Vit A IU's it has in it, then portion out the right amount to get the recommended dosage.

Or, I could just put a couple blops of it in the food dish & call it good, like I do now.
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kaffe
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« Reply #34 on: July 02, 2008, 12:25:49 AM »


Or, I could just put a couple blops of it in the food dish & call it good, like I do now.


 Cheesy  Tat's what I do most of the time too!  (with pumpkin)
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JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #35 on: July 02, 2008, 06:17:45 AM »

Gee, this is too confusing for me anyway.

What was wrong with the dog recipes from Strombeck?  They look really simple and easy and he already has it calculated for you.  Too much grain?

On a side note, a relative has been cooking 2 of his recipes for diabetic dogs, and the dog is doing very well on it.
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #36 on: July 02, 2008, 06:25:11 AM »

Here are some nifty sources I use frequently for looking up medical, scientific acronyms, abbreviations, terminology, etc.

http://www.acronymfinder.com/

http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/

http://www.medilexicon.com/
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
petslave
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« Reply #37 on: July 02, 2008, 10:45:37 AM »

Those are good links, JustMe, thanks for putting those in.

This vet site has some home cooking info, just categories of foods and percentages, add oil, calcium & a multi vitamin (whatever that is) and you're good to go:

http://www.crvetcenter.com/homefood.htm

I don't agree with a few of the ingredients & snacks, but otherwise it looks like a way to get started.


I think the "add a multi-vitamin" is the part that makes me go  Huh  in the home-made recipes.  There are so many out there, some good, some bad, some specifically for home feeding, most are for supplementing commercial diets.  Some recommend a human multi, but anyone who has bought any in the past 5 years knows there are 100's of formulas on the market now.  Some have 1000% or more of all the water solubles.  Exactly WHICH multi are we supposed to use?
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Moonlight
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« Reply #38 on: July 14, 2008, 06:41:16 PM »

Does anyone know if I could substitue cornish hen for duck for a dog with a very sensitive stomach?  I'm not sure if she may be allergic to chicken...
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kaffe
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« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2008, 06:55:23 PM »

Does anyone know if I could substitue cornish hen for duck for a dog with a very sensitive stomach?  I'm not sure if she may be allergic to chicken...

absolutely, yes... as long as your dog is not allergic to chicken.  Cornish game hen is also a lot less fatty and therefore healtheir for your dog.
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JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #40 on: July 18, 2008, 11:00:27 AM »

I've been looking at Dr. Strombeck's recipes for healthy dogs. 

A lot of them include: 

tablespoons of sardines, canned, tomato sauce.

teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride)

bonemeal tablets (10 grain)

multivitamin-mineral tablet

1.  Does anyone know how much commercial eggshell powder is equivalent to one of those bonemeal tablets?

2.  Salt substitute:  Is that okay to use or is there something else I can use?

3.  Will dog vitamins suffice for the multivitamin-mineral tablet?

4.  Why sardines and are they okay to use?
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
kaffe
Guest
« Reply #41 on: July 18, 2008, 11:20:08 AM »

I've been looking at Dr. Strombeck's recipes for healthy dogs. 

A lot of them include: 

tablespoons of sardines, canned, tomato sauce.

teaspoon salt substitute (potassium chloride)

bonemeal tablets (10 grain)

multivitamin-mineral tablet

1.  Does anyone know how much commercial eggshell powder is equivalent to one of those bonemeal tablets?

2.  Salt substitute:  Is that okay to use or is there something else I can use?

3.  Will dog vitamins suffice for the multivitamin-mineral tablet?

4.  Why sardines and are they okay to use?

JustMe, this is just my "take":

1.  (a)  Find out how much calcium is in the bonemeal tab and we can readily make the eggshell substitute ammount.
(b)  weigh the meat(s) and we can find out the phosphorus load and therefore add the appropriate amount of eggshell

2.  Potassium chloride is OK to use in a a dog with no heart issues nor kidney issues.  Theoretically, salt and its substitutes could be removed from a recipe without affecting any sensitive electrolyte balance.  There is ample sodium and potassium in natural foods like meats and veggies.  The salt or salt substitute is added in recipes for pets only for palatability.  You can alwasy add just half of what the recipe calls for just so to bring out the flavors of the meats.

3.  If the doggie vitamins contain both vitamins and minerals, then yes... this is the type of multivit that Strombeck means anyway.  Ideally, the multivit should have Vit A, all the B's, C, D, E, K.  Minerals should at least have zinc, copper, potassium, magnesium, and trace minerals.

4.  Sardines provide a rich source of Omega 3, 6 and 9.  That's for the skin, coat and organs.  And sardines are very low on mercury, if that is a concern.  Plus most pets love the smell and taste of sardines.

Hope this helps?
2. 
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5CatMom
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« Reply #42 on: July 21, 2008, 12:12:15 PM »



I've yet to find any source, including AAFCO, that can reconcile the "dry matter" calculation. Simply stated, it doesn't make any sense. Dry is 10% moisture and wet is more like 80%, but pets don't eat 4-5 times as much wet as dry. As close as I could ever tell, ounce for ounce, they eat about the same amount of food whether it's wet or dry. Homemade is basically wet food, but where I've been able to find numbers on supplements, it looks to me that it would be a mistake to calculate homemade on a "dry matter" basis, which would amount to adding on the order of 5 times as much of everything. The AAFCO numbers appear to match other numbers I've been able to dig up if it's calculated on an "as fed" basis.
...   I have yet to find a source that provides pet minimum daily requirements on all vitamins and minerals in the same terms as are available for humans. The argument against providing the information in those terms is dogs vary in size, so the amounts would be a lot different between large and small, but I don't see why it couldn't be expressed on a weight basis. For example, X amount of supplements, per 20 pounds of a pet's weight, per daily serving.


Don:  I once began a chart comparing what's in my home prepped raw with the nutritonal requirements posted by the NRC, Pitcairn, and a European paper... drove myself nuts... and 5CatMom too  Cheesy Cheesy

You're right about the extreme difficulty in calculating anything on a dry matter basis - very confusing... The nutritonal studies now calculate nutrient levels in foods not on DM or "As Fed" but in "Metabolizable Energy (ME)" --- yes --- another unit of measurement to confuse me even further!  Grrrrr....  This is what I am trying very hard to understand to date  Cheesy  I'll let you know if I "crack the code"  hee hee heee heee  It won't be anytime soon

Kaffe, LOL I'm still nuts over this  Grin

5CatMom
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4leggersMom
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Skeeter


« Reply #43 on: August 08, 2008, 06:32:10 AM »

I have a question I am hoping someone can answer.  We have two Labradors, one has itchy skin problems (I believe grass related).  My husband has started adding cottage cheese and 1 hard boiled egg to their Nature's Variety dry kibble twice a day.  I am wondering if eating 14 eggs a week for a dog would be anything like eating that many a week for a human (which is not recommended)?  Thank you
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YesBiscuit!
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« Reply #44 on: August 08, 2008, 08:19:42 AM »

To my knowledge, cholesterol is not generally a problem in dogs, if that's the line you are thinking along.  Dr. Strombeck's book of homemade recipes recommends eggs as the regular source of protein in his diets.  I myself have fed eggs daily to dogs with no ill effects obseved.
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