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Author Topic: Cause of CWD in deer, elk found?  (Read 3415 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: September 11, 2009, 09:50:16 AM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/science/10brain.html?_r=2

Study Spells Out Spread of Brain Illness in Animals
SANDRA BLAKESLEE
Published: September 9, 2009

I'm not sure what this could mean for those buying venison commercial foods for their pets and/or making
homemade pet food with a venison base. It's definitely not hopeful for the deer and elk.

The infectious agent, which leads to chronic wasting disease, is spread in the feces of infected animals long before they become ill, according to a study published online Wednesday by the journal Nature. The agent is retained in the soil, where it, along with plants, is eaten by other animals, which then become infected.
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Spartycats
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« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2009, 12:01:02 PM »

Scary.

I found another study on the soil issue.  Now I am wondering about montmorrillonite clay?  (article is way over my head)

http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.0030093

"Soil may serve as an environmental reservoir for prion infectivity and contribute to the horizontal transmission of prion diseases (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies [TSEs]) of sheep, deer, and elk. TSE infectivity can persist in soil for years, and we previously demonstrated that the disease-associated form of the prion protein binds to soil particles and prions adsorbed to the common soil mineral montmorillonite (Mte) retain infectivity following intracerebral inoculation. Here, we assess the oral infectivity of Mte- and soil-bound prions. We establish that prions bound to Mte are orally bioavailable, and that, unexpectedly, binding to Mte significantly enhances disease penetrance and reduces the incubation period relative to unbound agent."
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lesliek
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« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2009, 02:01:27 PM »

This is a real problem for me ! There are deer all over the yards here & the dogs eat the feces. They also eat the grass as well as the cats,Unless I fence my entire 2 1/2 acres with a 12' electric fence there is no way to keep them out.
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catwoods
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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2009, 02:03:58 PM »

This is also a concern for me since there are deer walking around us, too.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2009, 02:16:20 PM »

Article way over my head, too. But wouldn't you think that FSE would be a lot more common if the
disease prion in the soil was adapted for cats? That's my question or query number one.
Question two, as far as I know there is no dog equivalent.
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catbird
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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2009, 03:54:05 PM »

Yikes, that summary that you posted, Spartycats, is enough to scare me off the Mte clay in cat food forever!  I'm almost glad that in made my cats constipated in the few foods I tried, so that I ended up not using them.
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Spartycats
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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2009, 05:24:14 PM »

Article way over my head, too. But wouldn't you think that FSE would be a lot more common if the
disease prion in the soil was adapted for cats? That's my question or query number one.
Question two, as far as I know there is no dog equivalent.

That's a good point-- thank you, 3cat.  I'm going to assume that this prion, relative to wasting disease, does not cross to other species through soil, or we would have a lot more cases in cats.  The known cases in cats have been from eating bse-infected beef, I believe.  I've never seen it mentioned in dogs.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2009, 05:47:02 PM by Spartycats » Logged
3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2009, 05:48:37 PM »

OK, now here's Question 3. Sorry, it's the one that scares me:
Those buying commercial venison pet food, are brains and spinal chords in there?
If they are, is that a TSE or BSE problem for our pets?
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petslave
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« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2009, 08:32:28 PM »

BSE is definitely a problem for cats.  A number of cases occured in domestic and zoo cats in the UK during their big outbreak.  There are a few cases of dogs getting it too, but they don't seem as susceptable, or maybe it takes longer to show up.

Some of the PF companies use venison from New Zealand so there isn't a concern of CWD in deer/elk since they don't have it in their herds.  This article says CWD is not a concern for dogs and cats, or other domestic animals.  It also posts the range of wild and captive herds that are infected:

http://www.health.state.ny.us/diseases/communicable/zoonoses/cwd.htm

In the book I read on these diseases, it sounds like some researchers believe BSE may have been originally transferred to deer & elk from cattle herds that had it, probably at one of the experimental stations where they were studying BSE. 

Scrapie, the sheep version of prion disease, is definitely well established in US sheep.  I worry about it in pet foods too, but it's been here quite awhile and there doesn't seem to be any evidence it jumps species.
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