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Author Topic: Be a "Freegan," an Alternative to Spending & Driving Production  (Read 2500 times)
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purringfur
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« on: September 27, 2007, 02:32:01 PM »

Be a "Freegan." 

I just read a two-page spread about "Freegans" in the latest issue of the news magazine, THE WEEK.  The article highlighted a woman, age 51, who was in the corporate world making a six figure income... and became a freegan (I believe) in Manhattan.  Some have become freegans when boycotting didn't work.

Here's the first paragraph from the site below that explains what a Freegan is.

"Freegans are people who employ alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources. Freegans embrace community, generosity, social concern, freedom, cooperation, and sharing in opposition to a society based on materialism, moral apathy, competition, conformity, and greed."

Third paragraph from the freegan.info site...  This sounds a lot like what some of us are trying to do...

"Freeganism is a total boycott of an economic system where the profit motive has eclipsed ethical considerations and where massively complex systems of productions ensure that all the products we buy will have detrimental impacts most of which we may never even consider. Thus, instead of avoiding the purchase of products from one bad company only to support another, we avoid buying anything to the greatest degree we are able."

http://freegan.info/

Sound familiar, anyone?  ..."an economic system where the PROFIT MOTIVE HAS ECLIPSED ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS..."

What do you think?  I wrote in another thread some of the things I've been doing (yardsales, FreeCycle, rummage sales)... will look for it.

What are some of the things you're doing?

 
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Buy local.  Buy organic.
If you ate today, thank a farmer, hopefully a small, local farmer.

Remember the thousands & thousands of pets that died to give US a wake-up call about the safety of ALL food and products.
mal
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« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2007, 02:59:26 PM »



purringfur:

What a great idea and label. I know I have bought 2 Black & Decker coffeee pots in the last 2 1/2 years (basic turnon/turn off)..Both made in China and both have had the non-stick area around the heater element just "disolve away". (No response from the company  Sad)I have looked for a coffee maker NOT made in China and from the cheap..$$15 to the expensive..$120 ...I have not been able to find one Not made in China. My toaster went yesterday..same scenario.. and I am SO frustrated. I will be attending some local garage sales this weekend and see if I can find an older model of these appliances. I think if more people look into the barter and second-hand market we could actually find some quality products out there..unlike..IMHO..the garbage they are selling in the stores now.


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JJ
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« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2007, 08:50:06 PM »

mal someone just posted at least 20 - 30 different site w/products made in america. Do not recall what topic it is under but do a search on here and you might be able to find a reasonable priced coffee maker that is made in america.
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May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
purringfur
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Posts: 515


In my heart forever...


« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2007, 05:34:24 AM »

No real dumpsters to pick around here for human food...  don't think I'd ever go that far anyway, but I do have an arrangement with a restaurant where I frequent, that is saving chicken breast fillets & beef that should not be reheated because it might get too dry.  The chef is quite particular about what he serves, so I just rinse the meat well to get rid of any spices/sauces and give it to my dogs.  I always cook for them, but the extra meat comes in handy.  I also volunteer to do a little computer work for the owner.  He's the one who suggested saving the meat for me instead of throwing it out.  He also believes he lost an animal to the food, and I keep him updated on the recalls. 

Maybe some of you can ask at local restaurants for meats for your pets in exchange for doing advertising or something similar?

Those with little growing children could easily set up an exchange of clothing with other parents/relatives to pass around clothes when your little one outgrows a size, instead of buying new.

Also, look to bartering sites - a great way to exchange one item or service for another.

Sorry about your coffeepot, mal.  They don't last very long, do they?  That goes for all appliances.  Microwaves, I think, are a good example of an appliance that doesn't last long and costs more to fix than it does to throw away!  I read a while ago that companies deliberately manufacture their products to break down within a certain time frame to keep us replacing items, thus driving up production and profits.  We're known as the "throw away" society.

To avoid creating a demand (often for cheap, perhaps toxic imports), we just need to break out of the mindset that we "need this" or "need that."  Long ago, I decided not to keep up with "the Joneses" and compare what we have in relation to what others have.  I know it's difficult for children in school "not to have the very latest," but parents can talk to their children about pressures and how by not joining in, they are not contributing to more production, more waste, more pollution, adding to the problem of often exploited workers, etc. (not to mention holding on to their shrinking wallets).   Wink

I'm putting my money toward whole local foods, organics, healthier cleaners, slowly replacing harmful items in my home, etc. 


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Buy local.  Buy organic.
If you ate today, thank a farmer, hopefully a small, local farmer.

Remember the thousands & thousands of pets that died to give US a wake-up call about the safety of ALL food and products.
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2007, 09:31:55 PM »

purringfur as far as appliances lasting - my frig is an Amana. Only repairs it needed since I have owned it from 1986 are more freon and a new fan motor. When repairman arrived his comment was "you have the good refrigerator". When I asked what he meant said it is made by the Amish at their plant in Ames, IA and they do not build garbage. Not bad two repairs in 21 yrs and frig still works great. I have the freezer on the bottom as it's so much bigger than top freezer models. Should this one ever give out will buy the same brand and model again.
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May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
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