Itchmo Forums for Cats & Dogs Brought to you by Itchmo: Essential news, humor and info for cats, dogs and pet owners.
November 12, 2019, 04:07:55 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  

Go To Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.


Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Pet limit rules in counties, cities, AND apartments  (Read 17109 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
lilblu
Member Group 2
Jr. Member
*
Posts: 43


« on: February 08, 2011, 10:59:58 AM »

I'd like to know whether any organization is doing anything to fight the pet limit rules many counties and cities impose along with apartment buildings?

The neighboring city has a pet limit of 4 dogs/cats. I don't know what the laws are regarding other pets. Most apartments have a 2 pet limit rule.

I have relatives that recently moved into an apartment from a 10 acre farm. They had 5 pets and the apartment only allows 2. Now I know why so many animals end up in animal shelters. In this case, I was able to take the other three pets.

I don't understand why more than 2 cats or small dogs aren't allowed in apartments. I can understand maybe having a dog limit if the dogs are large. In my relatives apartment, their upstairs neighbors (especially the kids) sound like a herd of elephants with lead feet. There is no way any animal could cause that much annoyance, so I don't see the problem.

As far as the county and city pet limit rules, I don't get it. If the pets are inside, what is the issue?

Why isn't anyone fighting this? I'm sure it's like this in just about every state in the USA. People are fighting against pet food companies, where's the fight against pet limit laws? Animals die everyday because of these ridiculous laws.
Logged
catwoods
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6804



« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2011, 04:53:06 PM »

I share your objections to pet limit laws. I don't know about any organized opposition, and I'm not up to researching it at the moment, but I believe Nathan Winograd, who wrote Redemption, also objects. He has a web site; I don't know if it covers this issue.

There is also rental housing where absolutely no pets are allowed. None of it makes any sense to me. Responsible persons who take good care of pets are going to make good tenants.
Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2011, 11:27:11 PM »

It is the owners who let their pets pee all over the place, chew up the mouldings, the walls, bark, whine, yip all day while the people are at work, etc. that give the responsible pet owner a bad name and ruin it for those who do care and make it their responsibility to make sure their pet does not do any of the above. Been there in the past and was told "NO PETS" so many times til I moved into a house of my own.

Have talked to quite a few landlords and as much as they would like to, others have given them a bad taste and so they do not want pets. Noticed that more are renting to people w/pets it just takes a little more time to find these places.

Best of luck to all who are going thru this, trying to find a place to move, let alone find a place that will accept a dog or cat.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
Mandycat
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5610


« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2011, 12:38:22 AM »

JJ is right. It is the irresponsible pet owners who make it bad for the good ones.  The damage caused in a rental apartment or house due to those irresponsible pet owners is just too expensive to fix every time the rental unit changes tenants.  Just think of the cost of replacing the carpet in your house every couple years.  It has to be done to protect your investment when you are a landlord.  Would you rent a place that reeks of cat or dog pee?  Landlords avoid that expense by not renting to pet owners.   Undecided
Logged
bug
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4905

RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2011, 08:26:52 AM »

People in our city have just gone through fighting apartment regulations that allow landlords to refuse entry on the basis of a pet. It's called Fluffy's Law and it didn't pass legislation. Instead, the government allowed landlords who would allow pets to charge a pet deposit in addition to the security deposit people pay. Unfortunately, the damage done by irresponsible pet owners still deters some landlords from allowing pets. On the other hand, many apartments that don't allow pets have pets because the caretaker lets them and doesn't tell the property owner, who is usually absent all the time.

Our city allows 3 of any one species in any home by law. You can have 3 cats, 3 dogs, 3 ferrets, 3 frogs, 3 birds, 3 chinchillas, etc., but you can't have 4 cats. The city doesn't go looking for people with more than the "legal" limit but if neighbors complain about too much barking or the property smelling like cat urine, they will investigate. Some people have won -- not giving up their pets but some have lost. At least, there's been precedent for some being able to keep their pets but the bottom line is, if you have more than 3 of any type, make sure they're not bothering anyone. People shouldn't even know you have as many as you do.
Logged

My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2011, 07:43:26 PM »

bug those are very lenient allowances but making sure no one knows how many you do have (keeping the total amount hidden) well, it just takes one person to rat you out and then you could end up out of a place to live and then what happens to all the (hidden-over allowed amount) of pets you do have when you can't find another place that will let you move in w/all of them? Not fair to the pet if you have to then give them up to a shelter. Unless you have a home of your own that you can care for all of them in might be better to wait to have more than the limit to be fair to other renters and the animals themselves.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
bug
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4905

RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2011, 07:15:34 AM »

Oh, JJ. I didn't mean people should have over the limit in apartments -- I did mean if you owned your own home. That limit applies to any dwelling allowing pets. Yeah, that would be a recipe for disaster in an apartment because you can be removed anytime and this is happening a lot around here -- apartments turning into condos.
Logged

My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
lilblu
Member Group 2
Jr. Member
*
Posts: 43


« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2011, 10:08:54 AM »

I totally understand about pets causing damage or noise disturbance (in the case of dogs) in an apartment or rental house. But, non pet owners are just as capable of causing all those problems just as much as pets do. What's the difference between a noisy dog and a noisy neighbor? Or what about pet pee stains on the carpet vs. spilled food stains on the carpet? My grandfather is in a wheelchair and lives in an apartment and he has chipped all the paint off the corners of some of the walls from accidentally running into them. Him and grandma have as many food stains on the carpet as pet stains.

As long as the people pay in full for all the damage they caused when they move out of a place, I don't see why it should matter. To me, kids are usually more of an annoyance and a problem then animals.

Maybe there should be a law in place about pre-existing pets. Like in my relatives' case, they had 5 pets before they moved. So they should be allowed to keep them all no matter where they live, even if there's a pet limit rule. Then once their pets die or whatever, they shouldn't be allowed to have more than the allowed limit.
Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2011, 01:21:28 PM »

lilblu you are then talking about allowing the amount of pets and any building owner w/rental units should be told by law they have to allow people with a handful of pets to rent their units? Then the owners of these building would have no choice but to require a huge security deposit for just pets alone to cover/repair/replacement of any damages, etc.

As far as food being dropped on the floor - no way would that smell compare with dog and cat urine soaked into wooden floor boards or carpeting or furniture. One place I had rented to move into, I had no idea that the humidity would bring about such an odor from the carpeting that before I unloaded the moving truck we had to completely remove all the carpeting as the stink from the urine was so strong it about burned your eyes and no way would I allow my furniture, drapes, etc. to be stunk up from the (more than) overpowering smell.

Maybe the owners should make the security deposits more to cover what needs to be cleaned/repaired/replaced after human and animals move out.

p.s. lots of people move out in the middle of the night to avoid paying for damage above what their security deposit would cover, let alone those who are out of work and living in places that they have stopped paying rent on too, so I guess the building owner loses all the way around, but just imagine if anyone on here is a building owner - lets hear how you feel, if you like to share.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
catwoods
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 6804



« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2011, 04:52:16 PM »

I do understand about the damage caused to housing if pets aren't well cared for, I just still feel it's so unfair for the responsible pet owners to be have a hard time finding lodging because of that. I'd like to see a system that allows persons who can furnish references from vets and/or previous landlords to rent places. I have to agree also, that there can be noise and damage from irresponsible tenants with no pets; then there's the possibility that some non-pet damage occurs not through fault, but through normal living conditions.

I personally feel a bit safer in a neighborhood where I hear an occasional bark here and there, because dogs do discourage criminals. (I know they are not a guarantee). Damage to landlords' property is one of the many ill effects of criminal break-ins. Also, I know rodents can be poisoned, but I don't like the effect on the environment. Cats are a much more natural remedy. Rodents can cause tremendous structure damage including house fires from chewed electrical wiring.

According to what I've read pet limit laws in cities, counties, and rental property don't actually deter serious hoarding situations. They just hamper responsible owners who have the capacity as well as the inclination to care for more than the numbers allowed. That puts more animals on the street and/or in shelters. This is JMHO of course.  
« Last Edit: February 16, 2011, 01:51:27 PM by catwoods » Logged
merrihart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4755



« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2011, 03:37:11 PM »

I don't know about laws about pet limits, but as a renter, I am subject to a cat fee, monthly, per cat. 

In my city/county, I have been told it is the law that the carpet must be replaced, not cleaned, when a tenant moves out.  Any improvements on the apartment I make must be undone when I leave.  I'm contemplating removing the carpet, which Bella uses as her claw sharpening device, and installing vinyl wood flooring.  But only if I'm going to live there longer, which looks most positive.  I resign my lease in April, for July.

I wish I had a recourse with the leasing company/owner to renegotiate the pet fee based on my providing a new floor.   Undecided
Logged
JJ
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 8531


« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2011, 04:12:59 PM »

merrihart doesn't hurt to inquire about not getting a raise in your rent if your putting in new flooring instead of the pet fee unless the pet fee is more than a rent increase might be. With so many homes foreclosed on and people now having to rent they say it is a landlords market and rents are going to go up. Just another thing to think about asking also.
Logged

May your troubles be less,
Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
merrihart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4755



« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2011, 04:31:15 PM »

The cat fee is more than the rent goes up.  I'm lucky that way, that there is some type of rent control.

Apartments around here are at a record low for rental status.  The housing bubble hardly burst here, maybe owners lost 10% of their home value, maybe less.  I don't know how people can afford houses around here, most don't sell for less than 280k, and those are condos or townhomes.  Condos, I think, took a harder hit.  Existing condos are selling for a bit cheaper than they were, but the condo fees are outrageously high.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Copyright 2007 Itchmo.com: Read the latest cat, dog and pet news, pet food recall info, product reviews and more — updated daily.
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines | Sitemap