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Author Topic: Phosphate Binders  (Read 412 times)
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alek0
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« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2019, 05:45:28 PM »

Some of the Weruva fish flavours are relatively low in phosphorus (Mideast Feast for example), and they keep poop soft better than adding pumpkin for example. If Gypsy can eat fish, maybe that would help. Mitzie also gets rock hard poop occasionally, and feeding Weruva more often seems to take care of it. I was feeding it rarely before because of soft poo, but I've been using it more often lately after her tooth extraction since it has lots of liquid and she loves that.
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GKit
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« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2019, 12:39:33 AM »

I did not know that about the Weruva fish flavors, alek. Good to know for future reference! Gypsy cannot have fish, unfortunately, but Taggy likes fishy smelling things, so it’s always handy to have these bits of info. I wish she could have some fish, because almost every make your own cat food recipe calls for adding fish oil to get vitamin A & D in there, and almost every cat food has some fish oil in it. She is not allergic to green lipped mussel powder, go figure, and we’ve been using that for a few years. It gives us some of the trace minerals we don’t get enough of in her rabbit.
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alek0
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« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2019, 06:06:50 PM »

Have you tried giving her fish oil? Allergies are usually to protein, not to fats. Though of course you can always go for liver as a source of vit. A. Some shellfish and shrimp can be a source of bit. D if she tolerates that, and egg yolks also, but egg yolks are high in phosphorus. You can probably find some bit D enriched butter I suppose since I am getting option for salted high in bit. D and unsalted no vit. D.

I like this website for detailed food comparisons, and you can actually search foods high in A and low in B based on 100 g or 200 kcal servings. Useful for humans, but possibly useful for knowing what you can try for cat's diet:
https://nutritiondata.self.com

You have everything, omega 3 & omega 6, amino acid profiles, vitamins, minerals...
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GKit
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« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2019, 12:23:12 AM »

That is what I thought about the fish oil too, but it did not prove out in testing.  Angry When Gypsy reacts to a food, her butt gets red and puffy and bleeds. You take away the food, the redness and bleeding stop. Fish oil was a no go, which was a bummer. Fortunately the ground raw rabbit we get now includes liver, which gave us the Vitamin A. For D, I am using a lanolin sourced vitamin D capsule made by Bluebonnet Nutrition. Their VCap vitamins and minerals had the fewest number of excipients in them, usually just vegetable cellulose and vegetable magnesium stearate, so that’s worked for us. But yeah, I was looking at goat milk and all kinds of things before I found the stuff I am using now.  

I love nutritiondata.self.com! It is my go to site too, but I never looked at the search tools available. That is awesome!
« Last Edit: May 30, 2019, 12:39:18 AM by GKit » Logged
GKit
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« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2019, 11:40:59 AM »

Gypsy appears to be allergic to aluminum hydroxide.  Huh I did not think this was possible, (?!?!?!?!) but Gypsy excels at doing the unexpected.  Ordered some soy protein isolate after nutritiondataself.com pulls that up as a high protein low phosphorus option other than egg white; from what I read soy is controversial for cats but a couple of Royal Canin and Hills? K/d renal foods use it, so, plan D. The soy protein isolate has 0.8% phosphorus and 92% protein on a dry matter basis, compared to 2.3% phosphorus and 62% protein in the rabbit.
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catwoods
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« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2019, 02:24:45 PM »

Many hopes that this will work for Gypsy, Gkit.
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