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Author Topic: New kitten - tests to be done, separation time  (Read 4390 times)
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alek0
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« on: February 17, 2011, 09:28:56 PM »

Not sure whether this is appropriate place, but since I mainly care about testings, vaccinations, and separation from diseases prevention rather than slow introduction point of view, I hope this is the right place to ask.

We are planning to get a little brother for Sophie, as I have mentioned before. At present, we have a possibility to get a Russian blue kitten in late March. No rescue kittens available from a person I know at the moment which would be only choice since I have to be sure about the temperament (need easy-going cat likely to get along with others, yet playful enough to provide company to Sophie). Also, my vet is advising against a rescue kitten and suggesting either another ragdoll or russian blue due to fact that Mitzie is quite jealous and rather difficult so we need a laid back, easy going kitten to fit in.

So, the kitten will undergo export/import inspections and will be fully vaccinated. The breeder has also agreed to do FeLV test (I'll pay additional cost) but she said her vet said that FIV is not reliable for kittens. Both FIV and FeLV should be a low risk when getting a cat from a registered breeder, right? Do I need to worry about it?

The kitten will be in a separate room for 1-2 weeks, the room door has louvers so there is air circulation and cats will be able to see each other but not touch each other. Do you think this is good enough?
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Mandycat
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2011, 09:38:22 PM »

Congratulations on the new addition!  I think your plan sounds great. Will be looking forward to pics and stories about the newcomer!  Hope Sophie just loves him!   Wink
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alek0
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2011, 10:08:19 PM »

So no need to worry about FIV? Breeder is registered and legitimate, cat photos in pics look fine, actually unlike many other photos from catteries the cats look alert and happy.

Or maybe I am wrong, what do you guys think, this is the place we are considering, the last pic is the mother of the kitten we want to get:
http://www.tlcpets.com.au/girls.htm

This was another one I was looking at, but breeder was not as responsive, and cats look a bit sad on the photos (at least that is my impression):
http://users.net2000.com.au/~obanyasw/russians.html

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merrihart
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2011, 05:39:30 AM »

I'm confused.  FiV is very important, imo, but the breeder should be paying for all shots up to the point you picky your little boy up.  Sophie is still young enough to contract FiV from a carrier.

Other than that, enjoy your kitten!
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bug
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2011, 09:50:52 AM »

Both FIV and FeLV are a crapshoot with kittens. The reason is that it can be transient. All cats in a cattery are at risk for FeLV because it's a disease that is spread by friendly contact and kittens are most at risk. FIV would have had to have been passed on by the mother -- and that's a possibility if any of the moms are positive. I'd ask if the moms have been FIV tested. Having said all that, FIV is less of a concern unless they draw blood on a regular basis. Being a kitten, it isn't likely that it would attack the others and bite them so hard to draw blood.

With either diseases you need to test more than once if you want to be sure in a kitten. For FeLV, you would have the initial test and then retest in three months. The trouble with FeLV is that they can have it, test positive and then clear it from their system and test negative later. They can also be positive, the virus then goes into "hiding" and can only be detected by a test such as the PCR or Western blot. The standard test is the ELISA and can only detect circulating antibodies.

FIV is almost the same in that they can test positive because of antibody transmission from their mother and then actually be negative because they didn't, themselves, acquire the virus. So, the recommendation is the same. Test once and then test again in three months.

And yes, they're supposed to be sequestered the entire time. I've never gotten a very young kitten -- Mia was the youngest -- found at 6 months and I had her tested for both once. I think most of us do this, but if you want to go by the books, it's a different process.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2011, 09:52:30 AM by bug » Logged

My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
JJ
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2011, 09:21:33 PM »

Beautiful coloring in the first link. The 2nd one that you think they are sad - might just be the person taking pics may not be a good picture taker. The lil ones looking out from the doorway, cocking their lil heads - they are really cute (to me that is) but might not be for you. And their blue eyes - probably be as beautiful as Sophie's are.
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alek0
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« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2011, 09:32:59 PM »

Thanks for the comments. I plan to do testing after arrival anyway. I wonder is retesting necessary, and do I need to keep them separate for three months? That seems a bit too long, and I will discuss it with my vet for retesting. Kitten will be at least 14 weeks old after arrival, so I guess testing at 15-16 weeks of age should be good enough in terms of maternal antibodies not affecting the result and Ill keep them separate in the meantime.

JJ, in the second link little ones are really cute, but all older cats at least to me look less alert and a bit sad. Not sure whether I have wrong impression or what.

Actually, I would appreciate some comments on the choice between two. In the first case, breeder obviously loves animals, provides lots of info, but is less educated and sometimes forgets things. Second breeder seems more knowledgable but she gives less detailed answers to questions and she mainly seems to care about breeding the cats and kittens kept for breeding rather than those which will be "just pets".
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JJ
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« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2011, 09:52:42 PM »

First breeder might just not be used to 'details' which are so important to others, especially when you're going to have kitties for sale to new homes. Never looked at loving animals as having a lot in common with one's education.

When I had bred my sheltie years back I did so with a high school education. Just picked a stud with championship background, coming from good lines and gave the owner the pic of the litter - there were 7 puppies.

Is the 2nd breeder also one who shows cats too? Maybe selling some as pets is not something they run into a lot and might just be interested in selling ones that will be shown?

As far as the 'sad' pics of the adults - not a great picture taker or maybe a lousy camera to take pics with too which portrays the adults in a 'bad light' so to speak.


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Sandi K
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2011, 08:29:49 AM »

Alek, I might suggest having a fecal exam done, just to make sure it doesnt parasites of some sort. I think parasites can possibly be more prevalent in a cattery...at least thats what our experience was.  Sophers came to us with a neglected case of coccidia and it took us over a year to get rid of that and its sets them up for other problems especially if they are sick when they are kittens.  Its hard on their developing immune system.  Getting it on meds right away instead of waiting is very important because parasites left untreated are so hard to get rid of. I would also talk to your own vet about what tests they think should be done, dont just listen to the breeders vet.  This link does suggest testing for FIV and Felv and I think its wise to do it just as a precaution. 

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+2137&aid=2926
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alek0
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« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2011, 09:20:02 PM »

Confirmed arrival date, April 11th, my vet will come to see him on April 12th morning. FeLV test will be done before departure, FeLV repeated and FIV after arrival. Kitten also undergoes veterinary examination upon departure from Australia and arrival to Hong Kong, and will receive two vaccinations (F3) by the time of departure, last vaccination two weeks before travelling. He will be in the utility room for at least a week (the room will be kitten proofed, now it is a cat free zone), so they will be able to see and smell each other but not touch through the door with the grille, something similar to this:


I'll definitely be monitoring the consistency of No.2s and sort out any problems before introducing the cats, since Sophie arrived with giardia which was attributed to food intolerances, until the older two also developed smelly, light-colored soft poo. I won't do fecal tests in absence of any problems, since they often show false negatives, but in case of any problems of course we'll test and treat right away.

The breeder really likes animals, and she cares about their health. The travel plans may change depending on that, since she wants to be 100% sure that kitten will do well during the trip.

I am a bit concerned that she lost one litter last year at an age of 8 weeks to an unknown illness (there was prompt veterinary care provided but only one kitten survived), but the good thing is that she told me that honestly and I guess those things can happen. What do you guys think?

Also, any suggestions are welcome if I overlooked something.
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lesliek
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Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2011, 06:35:00 AM »

I agree its good the breeder was open about the past problem. Unfortunately catteries are more prone to disease problems, like shelters because of the number of animals. Its good that they tried to treat them & find an answer though. It sounds like you have everything planned well, are you going to introduce them 1 at a time so the kitten won't be overwhelmed ?
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Sandi K
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« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2011, 03:20:34 PM »

Cool!  A new kitteh!  Sophers burfday is April 18th...although she will be 4, I cant believe how fast the time goes.  Enjoy the kitten, they grow up too darn fast.  Note there is a difference between maturing and getting bigger, at least at my house.  Cheesy
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