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Author Topic: Need urgent help on your knowledge of IsolyteS sub-q fluids  (Read 5406 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: January 01, 2008, 12:44:35 PM »

I guess I need to admit that I'm paralyzed with fear as a result of the pet food recalls
of 2007. Every time I run into something new, IsolyteS manufactured by BBraun, even after
researching and asking every question I can of vets, manufacturers, and suppliers, I don't trust
the answers any more.

So anyone who knows about this subcutaneous fluid, please tell me what you know.
Specifically am interested in what it is equivalent to in terms of other brand names.

I never used to be this paranoid. "Thanks" pf companies and recalls of 2007 -- 3cats
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lesliek
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Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2008, 01:50:04 PM »

3cat- It's been too long since I did fluids for me to know. Have you thought of asking your pharmicist ?
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"the world's most inept extortionist"
Mandycat
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« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2008, 02:19:04 PM »

3cat -
     I tried to research this on the web, but found nothing of that name.  I did find the website for the company, which is a long established medical supply company that should cause you no concern. 

       www.bbraun.com

     If you have a bag of this fluid and can give me more specific information directly from what is written on the bag, I may be able to help more.  I am an RN and familiar with most IV solutions, but have not heard of this name.  However, the name does not always give a clear indication of what is in it.  I am kind of assuming from the name that it may be an isotonic sodium chloride solution with some kind of electrolytes added, but it really would help to have some additional information.  I didn't see this particular name on Braun's website, so it may be something new.  I'd love to help if I can, but need more info.
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Trudy
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« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2008, 02:45:13 PM »

I wish I could help, but i checked mine and it's not under that name.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2008, 05:16:03 PM »

A little spooky that no one seems to have encountered this, but thank you so
much for trying. Could anyone visiting a vet with a kidney failure furkid ask about it maybe?
thank you so much -- 3cats
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straybaby
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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2008, 05:29:03 PM »

here's my google link. may help? looks like there's a few varieties of Isolyte

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&q=Isolyte++Braun&btnG=Search
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Nabiya
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« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2008, 05:47:00 PM »

3Cats-How did you come about using this solution? Did your vet recommend it?  If it has electrolytes in it, it may be a "slow drip" type of IV injection rather than a needle under the skin.  It's my understanding that electrolytes have to be slowly dripped in through an IV over several hours.  I've had this done recently for Kitt'n and was told the electrolytes have to go in slowly over a long period of time (up to 24 hours).

When Kitt'n needs added potassium and electrolytes, she goes in for a 24 hour drip.  Otherwise, I'm using lactated ringer's for her every other day injection of fluids.  I think a vet should answer these questions to be on the safe side.
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3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2008, 06:52:32 PM »

Thanks, straybaby. excellent search!!! -- found phosphate ingredient in formula and withdrawal from FDA approval
process. So I think I'll think again. Thank you.

Agree, Nabiya, that this requires vet's advice, but got some differing opinions. NormosolR is for crf kitties with
too much calcium to begin with. Don't know enough about IV solutions, just digging for all the info I can get before using
Isolyte as a supplier-recommended alternative because they can't supply NormosolR. Jeez, don't like having to do this,
but I think you really do have to be very, very careful these days and double-check what you can. Thank you, Itchmo.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2008, 09:17:37 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2008, 09:07:54 PM »

Decided personally not to use this product based on its ingredients and split
vet advice, despite info given in phone call to manufacturer. Just a personal
decision. Thank you all very much for your suggestions and help. You really
did help this cat mom.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2008, 09:11:02 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
Mandycat
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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2008, 01:47:23 PM »

Nabiya -
     I found this link when I was searching for info for 3cat and thought it might be helpful to you and others with crf kitties.  As you can see from the chart, Lactated Ringers also has some Potassium in it.  The significant difference between the Lactated Ringers and what 3cat is using is that hers does not have any Calcium.  Her kitty apparently has a high calcium level, so it is omitted to prevent metabolic acidosis. The other difference is that the buffering substance is not the same.

                     http://members.verizon.net/~vze2r6qt/supplies/fluids.htm

     You are correct, however, that when there is an electrolyte imbalance and additional potassium is needed that it is administered by a slow drip over a long period.  That would be a larger dose that is diluted in IV fluid (usually normal saline) and slowly dripped directly into a vein over a 24 hour or so period of time.  The potassium has to be diluted to avoid irritating the vein, and, also, the larger volume of fluid allows for a very slow drip over that time frame to prevent the heart rhythm disturbances that could occur with a too rapid infusion.
     Just my best guess, but I think the amount of electrolytes added to these fluids is probably just enough to try to ensure a balance while encouraging output by the kidneys. 
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3catkidneyfailure
Guest
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2008, 10:39:21 AM »

Thanks to straybaby and Mandy, I need to correct some of this post.
The FDA withdrawal of a product in April 2005 was a different Isolyte with a higher pH, not the 6.7 pH version.
The reasons for using this IV fluid, as opposed to Ringers, need to be discussed with your vet based on
your cat's blood work and urianalyses and health history.
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