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Author Topic: My cat has disgusting teeth  (Read 17345 times)
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KimS
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« on: September 10, 2007, 01:47:22 AM »

My cat Gracie who has CRF has disgusting teeth. I noticed today she wasn't chewing her dry food. Just gulping it down!
I had to fight her to look in her mouth. (Not literally but kind of)
The side teeth are all scaly. I tried to brush them and she freaked. Just one of those finger brush things that are entirely awkward and lame.
No toothpaste..
Then afterwards my fingers smelled like pimple pus smell. (ICK yuck poooo  Shocked )

It's kind of the chicken and the egg regarding what came first her bad teeth or the kidney disease. I think the teeth were bad first.
She also has always had a heart murmur which I hear can also be caused by bad teeth.

My other cat Ruby who is the same age was told by the vet that she has amazing teeth for her age. Good genes she said.

I don't think they will wanna sedate her with her CRF and old age and all so what am supposed to do with the putrid smelling, possibly extra physically harmful teeth?

My dog Riley needs a little dental cleaning too, but his teeth are nothing compared to Gracies. He's only 4. She's 11 and her teeth have been crummy for about 8 years probably.
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JustMe
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2007, 03:07:51 AM »

Kim,

Maybe it is genes, like some people who never get cavities?

Vet will need to do blood work, etc., to see if your cat is a candidate for dental work.  It is imperative that it is done if your kitty can undergo surgery.  Believe me.  The longer you let it go on, the worse it gets, and then kitty may not be a candidate for surgery.  Bad teeth causes all kinds of problems, including damaging your cat's heart, just like in people.  My 17-year-old CRF cat just had major dental work in April.   He had high blood pressure at the time.  We had to get his blood pressure down prior to surgery.   Four removals. He lost his upper canines and some molars.  It took him several months to recover because his teeth had resorbed (I think that is the term) and the vet had to break the bone to get them out.  (I think that is how it was.  I was so distraught in April with my other cat dying, I really don't remember.)

We lost our almost 20-year-old in April.  Her teeth were so bad, she had a major, major infection going on.  She wasn't a candidate for surgery do to her advanced CRF or her teeth would have been taken care of. 

My 15-year-old had his teeth cleaned at the same time as the 17-year-old.  Luckily, no extractions for him this time around.

Sorry to be a nag, but hopefully your kitty is a candidate for surgery.  I think somebody on here recently had dental work done on a cat over 20, if I recall correctly.  Depends on the cat.  It is very important, as you know.  I don't consider 11 years old for a cat.  Most of my cats have lived to almost 20 despite the GWAINY KWAP they ate all their lives.

We have a running joke with the vet that when our cats turn 10, we're having all their teeth removed so they don't get dental disease.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2007, 03:50:05 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
shibadiva
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2007, 03:35:24 AM »

KimS My 17 year old CRF cat just had his annual blood work and checks which confirmed that he is a good candidate for dental treatment. He is having it done in a couple of weeks.

If your vet thinks your cat is a good candidate, treatment will go a long way towards quality of life. It cannot be comfortable to have all that infection.
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A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.
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alek0
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« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2007, 07:56:45 AM »

Kaffe had experience with Petzlife for tartar removal, I think that thread is in Pet products review section.

My Stefie needs to have cleaning done sometimes this year, if my alternative treatment methods are not successful. I am currently trying a few things, we'll see how it goes, if any of that stuff works I'll post the details.

One thing which is certain though - smaller brush, larger chance of success in brushing cat's teeth. I have really small C.E.T. cat toothbrush which is OK. Vet's best dental swabs are also acceptable, they look just like q tip. Finger brush was no way to even get close to the cat, not to mention tooth brushing.
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catbird
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2007, 09:13:20 AM »

My vet (cat specialist) will usually put the cat on an antibiotic if there is pus/infection, pending evaluation for whether or not the cat can undergo anesthesia.  The antibiotic helps.  This vet will also do a little cleaning with the cat awake if possible, using swabs and sometimes instruments.  Whether this can be done depends upon the level of cooperation of the individual cat. Sometimes vets and techs are more successful than the cat's family members because they know handling techniques, can work as a team, and the cat may realize he/she can't manipulate the professionals the way they can the rest of us.  It's no substitute for a thorough cleaning and work under anesthesia, but it's better than nothing.

My suggestion would be to ask the vet if he/she ever does this, and whether an antibiotic is indicated.  Since dental problems can cause so many other health problems, I'd urge you to see the vet soon.

My 10-year-old cat with severe heart murmur underwent anesthesia for a dental last year and did fine.  I've had it done on a 15-year-old with good results in the past.  I believe there are different anesthetics and protocols for animals who are older or less healthy.
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catmom5
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2007, 03:16:41 PM »

I think it's worse to wait than to check with the vet about having a cleaning done.  Dental problems can result in much worse problems.  There are special anesthetics that can be used with kidney cats.  CJ had to have major abdominal surgery in May and, being well aware of her kidney issues, worked closely with the anesthesiologist to find something that would be less likely to damage her kidneys.  She has also had scopes and biopsies, all under sedation.  If you have a vet teaching hospital (of a major university) close you might check there.
Good luck!
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KimS
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2007, 08:15:24 PM »

Thank you guys. All great ideas. I will make the appt. The reason I didn't get the cleaning last year was when they did the bloodwork and found she had CRF, I decided to wait. I'm not sure if the vet had the idea or I did.
I want to do right by my cat!!
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Trudy
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« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2007, 05:09:20 PM »

You need to see the vet as soon as you can. Your cat will probably be put on antibiotics for a while. Then they will have to pull the teeth. I just had My cats teeth pulled and she is 20. she feels so much better. The vet told Me She put Her under with a new drug [I can't remember the name of it] but it's made especially for older and not so healthy cats. Yes, She She can get all kinds of things like heart problems with bad teeth. Good luck.
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KimS
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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2007, 07:08:55 PM »

I went and she got some antibiotics to be on. We're going to get her teeth cleaned and maybe extracted (hope not!!) either this Fri or next monday.
She also got her plood and urine drawn to see how she's doing with her CRF. The doc was amazing.
She confirmed what I already know.
That low protein/ low phosphorus diet for the CRF is overrated. That quality protein is necessary.
And eating is just plain old good for a cat with CRF because they tend to lose so much weight.
I told her that when the cat eats Hills K/d for more than 2 days in a row her front legs tend to shake.
I heard that was due to low potassium and she said the food probably doesn't have enough potassium and she might need a supplement.
They will look in her bloodwork.
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JustMe
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« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2007, 07:26:36 PM »

The doc was amazing.
She confirmed what I already know.


Kim,  She does sound pretty amazing.  Hope everything goes well for your kitty.  How old is she?
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
KimS
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Posts: 322

Cake, Yum!


« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2007, 11:04:59 PM »

She turned 11 years old in August.
She is the cat that I call a Cougar. And she bit me today with that cruddy mouth of hers.
I just laughed!
She's not a happy vet goer.
But I want her to live forever. She sits with me while I have coffee every morning and sometimes head butts me.

« Last Edit: September 24, 2007, 11:06:34 PM by KimS » Logged
KimS
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Posts: 322

Cake, Yum!


« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2007, 12:36:09 AM »

So Gracie is going to get her teeth cleaned tomorrow. I hope she does ok, I am totally nervous.
I asked my vet if they had a gentle gas for her since she's old and the vet said they only use the most gentle stuff. (Paraphrased obviously)
She's been on antibiotics all week. They gave her loose bowels. But she actually was chewing on the crunchy dog food today which is already an improvement since she wasn't chewing her cat food a couple of weeks ago. Now she's crunching on the giant dog kibble.
Maybe she's drunk from the super boozy smelling antibiotics. (lucky cat)
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JustMe
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« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2007, 03:32:29 AM »

Kim,

Positive thoughts and prayers for you and your kitty.  She will feel much better after her teeth issues are taken care of.  It will take a short while to heal up if she needs extractions.   She will most likely have to eat wet food if she does have extractions, at least until she heals up.
My 17 and 14-year-olds had their teeth worked on this year. 
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
shibadiva
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« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2007, 03:51:11 AM »

KimS Here's hoping that she comes through with flying colours and feels a whole lot better. Your vet sounds great.

My boy,Genji, who is CRF and 17 years old, had his teeth done on Tuesday. He had two tiny pre-molar extractions (which counted as maybe 1/2 an extraction at most) and had the tartar scraped off. I was a little worried because of his age and kidney condition but he is fine. He has had quite a long story to tell me since he came home last night.

The vet recommends daily tooth brushing, finger brushing or wiping with gauze. If daily is not possible, do the mouth in sections as often as the cat will let you. Use the pet toothpaste, not human stuff..

Also, CET Chews but not more than a few times weekly because too much can cause diarrhea.

I won't comment on the dental diet recommendation. Genji eats 1/2 Orijen kibble and 1/2 wet food, so his gums get a little bit of a workout.
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A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.
~~ Gandhi
catbird
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« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2007, 08:40:46 AM »

Kim and Gracie,
Will be thinking supportive thoughts to both of you tomorrow.  I was a nervous wreck when Kalahari (10 years old and severe heart murmur) had it done last year too.  But she came through great, and feels so much better.  Good luck to you both.
catbird
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