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Author Topic: Cat Enema  (Read 13543 times)
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Laurie
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« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2007, 12:03:42 PM »

  Welcome rorambole. What a brave Mom you are to put your bare finger there! I would think it would be more comfortable for kitty if some type of lubricant was used in the future. Probably make it easier to clean your finger also. LOL  Oat bran can be added to the food for extra fiber, unless of course kitty cannot tolerate grains. What are you feeding her?
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lesliek
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2007, 03:44:41 PM »

rocambole- You could also try yogurt,acidophilus or flaxseed meal mixed into the food. I would definitely use gloves & vaseline ! Sounds like something in the new food is causing it. Or the lack of something. What are you feeding ? When my 5 were on the big 3 dry,1 of the cats & 2 of the dogs had chronic constipation. Had to add benefiber & hot water to the food every day. It does work.Since going to homecooked they have had no problems with going.
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rocambole
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« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2007, 04:57:31 PM »

Lindsey (he's a boy) started having constipation problems after the cat food recall.  We've changed his food a few times -- since he's had urinary tract blockages in the past, we've gone grain-free with him.  He now gets Instinct wet mixed with pumpkin twice a day, milk in the evening and Wellness Core (grain-free) as a snack.  He always loved dry food, but at least he seems to be eating all this stuff okay. 

I tried to get him and Pepper (the dog) to eat yogurt, but neither one of them would eat it -- I only buy the organic/GMO free, but neither one of them would eat it.  We took him off the Hill's c/d because that REALLY blocked him up -- that one took trips to the vet.

The vet says that with both the urinary and the poop end, if he's blocked, that organ (either the bladder or the rectum) seems to go into spasms that are painful, but don't actually move what needs to be moves.  Since Lindsey has been grain-free, he's been peeing just great, but we still get obstructions. 

After two nasty vet bills, I don't fool around with them anymore -- if he throws up his breakfast after not pooping the day before and hides (he is the most social cat I've ever had -- he's right at my feet as I type this now -- if he's not interacting with us, something is wrong), I grab him and feel his butt.  If I can feel the lump, he goes on the desk with the newspaper on it and we get those lumps out.  At this point, I think he knows the drill, so he usually strains and together, we get out the lumps. Four hours later, he seems completely back to normal (playing with the dog), so I'm glad I can spare him a trip to the vet -- which only stresses him out, which of course, makes a urinary blockage more likely.

However, next time, I'm going to try putting a warm compress on his butt (to get things moving), then use the gloves and Vaseline -- I don't want to damage his rectum doing this.  Any other tips on making sure I "get the goods" but don't hurt him is appreciated!

Meanwhile, where do folks buy digestive enzymes?  On the Net or do pet stores or health food stores carry them?  Is a digestive enzyme the same for cats and humans or should I only buy ones for cats? 

The grain-free really seems to be working for his urinary tract, so I don't want to add the oat bran or flax.  We were trying to add more milk to his diet as it's a natural source of lactulose, which is supposed to move things along better and he likes it.  The vet wants me to give him straight lactulose, but he HATES it -- we added some tuna fish oil to it to see if he'll like it better.

I've also heard adding more water dishes to get a cat to drink more can help.  Pepper and Lindsey share water -- they have a tower on the 2nd floor and a large metal bowl on the first floor.  Do those fancy "cat drinking fountains" actually work?

If anyone has any other suggestions, I'm definately listening!  Thanks for the help -- these forums have been such a help -- that's why we went grain-free for Lindsey in the first place.
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Laurie
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« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2007, 05:16:32 PM »

  Many Pet Specialty or Health Food stores carry the digestive enzymes for pets. I personally would only use one made for cats or dogs. Probiotics may help also. There are formulas such as Animal Essentials Plant Enzymes and Probiotics that will contain both. Only Natural Pets is a great site for natural and alternative remedies for various conditions. You can also look up recommended products by whatever condition the pet may have and read reviews of the products from people who have purchased them. I hope this helps.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2007, 05:19:26 PM by Laurie » Logged
JustMe
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« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2007, 05:23:01 PM »

How old is Lindsey?  If he is older, sometimes they get arthritic and that is part of the problem with them getting constipated.  Also if they are dehydrated.  Happened to 2 of my older ones before I switched them from mostly dry to all wet grain-free.

Mine basically stopped using the water fountain or drinking water from dishes since they have been strictly on wet.  The only one who makes a show of drinking from the sink faucet is the one who has early CRF.  They all used to love the fountain.  You have to clean them religiously.

Does your vet say it is safe for you to do this yourself?  There are delicate tissues involved.  Maybe use latex-free gloves, too, to be on the safe side.

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Eventually they will understand,
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For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
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"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Laurie
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« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2007, 06:23:23 PM »

  I forgot to mention that Slippery Elm is a wonderful supplement that is frequently used for both diarhea and/or constipation. http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=slipperyelm
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catmom5
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« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2007, 06:36:35 PM »

I'm not a vet, vet tech or medically trained professional so this is just a question that I have.  Please ask your vet before you do this.  Is it possible to use an infant glycerine suppository when he is so constipated?  I remember a long time ago using them occasionally for my kids.  Just a thought . . .
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JustMe
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« Reply #22 on: October 09, 2007, 07:03:52 PM »

http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings.plx?CID=WSAVA2003&PID=6622&O=Generic

rocambole,

Just my opinion, but I think you should leave this to the professionals.    Look under the Therapeutics section, paragraph 2.

This was an article directed at veterinarians and they are concerned with accidental perforation while performing enemas and disimpactions.  (I've heard of this with happening with people). 

Perforations would mean tears, potentially contaminating inner organs; i.e., fecal/bacterial contamination.
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
rocambole
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« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2007, 05:08:38 PM »

Thanks for the link -- I'm going to read it through.  Actually, my vet was encouraging about me doing it myself -- she seems to think that if I was willing to take it on, I should go for it.   She showed me where to feel him to see if there was a lump and had me watch her "dig him out."

Of course, I've been a client for almost 20 years - -she probably knows that if she gives me encouragement, I'm going to take the time to read up on it and figure out what I'm doing.  Plus, there's the blocked urinary tract thing -- the stress of going to the vet can bring on the blocked urerter, and she probably figures that more of a risk than giving me encouragement so I'll read up on everything and do my best to make sure it doesn't happen often than to have him go to the vet, get stressed and then maybe have his ureter block up.

I also don't wait that long so the poop isn't dried out -- it's just a mass, not really all that dry.  If Lindsey (he's 10, so I don't think it's arthitis -- he sure bounces around the house okay!) hasn't pooped the day before and he throws up his breakfast, then is straining, but nothing is coming out and is hiding, we get that lump out. 

Thanks so much for the in-depth article -- I'm going to take some time to really read it over! :-D

I'm going to take some time to read up on everything folks gave me -- I think we try the enzymes next as if I DON'T have to go "digging it out", I'm going for it.
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JustMe
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« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2007, 06:43:11 PM »

 
Actually, my vet was encouraging about me doing it myself -- she seems to think that if I was willing to take it on, I should go for it.   She showed me where to feel him to see if there was a lump and had me watch her "dig him out."

Thanks for clarifying that.  I was a little worried.  I hope you can find something to improve his situation.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2007, 06:46:20 PM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Mandycat
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« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2007, 09:12:18 PM »

rocambole -
     Have you tried any hairball preparations (they are also laxatives) to lubricate things from the inside?  The glycerin suppository idea also sounds reasonable to try. Maybe your vet can teach you to do a warm water enema that might be a gentler alternative.  Has your vet diagnosed any reason for the cat having this problem?  There is a condition called "Megacolon" that cats can acquire and the symptoms you mention seem to fit this problem.  Maybe you can ask your vet about it.
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rocambole
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« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2007, 03:21:39 PM »

We've been using Laxatone, but that is petroleum and high-sugar which isn't so good for the low-carb/prevent the urinary blockage thing.  Plus, I don't think it's doing much.

I'm definately going to ask about the glycerin suppositories -- they seem to make sense.

I'm worried about megacolon -- from my reading, it sounds like that to me, also.  My vet says this can be very tricky with some cats -- I'll ask about the suppositories and see if it's time to go to the Penn Vet School -- I would think there was a kitty GI person there -- they seem to have lots of different specialists and from my reading, it seems to be common with middle-aged to senior male, neutered, short-haired cats.  That's Lindsey -- and I would think enough other cats to warrent someone specializing in it.

Back to reading and if I learn something, I'll share it here!
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