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Author Topic: Cat closing eye  (Read 8811 times)
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mickey
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« on: June 02, 2009, 04:00:41 PM »

My 5yr old indoor boy kitty was closing his left eye last night. He has done this in the past a couple times, and it doesn't last very long (less than a day).

I've asked the vet about this the last time he was in (couple months ago), although the didn't have any trouble then so there wasn't anything for her to look at. She didn't think much of it and just asked if there was discharge from the eye, which there isn't.

Last night I thought I might've saw a little clear tearish type (what you would expect if you had irritated your eye). This morning when I looked at him there was some very little dried goop like we all get in our eyes when we wake up, so I don't know if it was discharge.

Eye seems fine today. Although when I tried to get his attention to look up so I could see better, he did shut it a tiny bit I think from the lights. So maybe something is making him sensitive?

Any thoughts? Thanks.

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lesliek
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Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2009, 04:59:29 PM »

I don't mess around with eye problems. My chi Remy almost lost an eye after a bad gouge in his cornea. I keep rx drops in the house for nights & weekends & if its bad I see the ER vet. It may just have been something in the eye irritating it,if so it should be fine tomorrow. If its not I would see the vet. DON'T use any human eye drops,the ph is different in dogs & cats.If you try to flush it at home,use sterile water.
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Mandycat
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« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2009, 05:21:49 PM »

mickey,
     He may have just gotten some dust or something in it and the tears washed it away.  To be sure, I would look for whether he does it again, look for discharge, check to see if the white part of his eye looks pink or red, and look to see if the "third eyelid" on that eye is raised (visible in the corner of the eye).  If any of those things are present, I would probably have the vet check just to be sure you are not missing something that needs treatment. 
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Steve
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2009, 05:46:18 PM »


Eye seems fine today. Although when I tried to get his attention to look up so I could see better, he did shut it a tiny bit I think from the lights. So maybe something is making him sensitive?

Any thoughts? Thanks.


I wouldn't be nervous about it Mickey. Most likely some irritation caused by a tiny particle, something which naturally washed out.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 05:59:32 PM by Steve » Logged
alek0
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2009, 07:56:15 PM »

I would closely observe it and make a vet appointment at first obvious sign of trouble, as listed by Mandycat. Since one of my cats has eye problems, I also have prescription eye drops at home to start treating problems as soon as they occur (non-steroidal antiinflammatory and antibiotic, steroid drops should not be used without veterinary examination because you need to rule out damage to the cornea) and I also have couple of bottles of saline eyewash for pets for just in case.
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Steve
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2009, 08:49:12 PM »

Yes definitely follow alek0 and mandycat's tips.

I didn't mean to say just blow it off and not monitor it.

Also Vets can treat minor eye issues and do exams to determine if there are any corneal issues but for complex eye problems an Ophthalmologist is the ONLY way to go if you ever have the need to treat something truly serious. Anything involving corneal issues, lesions, etc and it's an automatic Ophthalmologist appointment in our house.

I'm still going to put my bet on some kind of irritant that got in the eye and probably ended up in that speck of dried up goop. 



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mickey
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2009, 11:19:00 PM »

Thanks everyone.

He's seems fine now. I also thought it is an irritant because he is a crazy monkey running around, and I don't vacuum everyday! But it seems like it is always the left eye, every 6mos- 1 year.

If I took him to the vet now, they wouldn't see anything. But a vet that specializes in eyes could see if it's something more serious?
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mickey
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2009, 11:47:39 PM »

Ok, now he is closing it a little.
But no discharge, not pink or red, no third eye.
I'll continue to keep an eye on it.
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lesliek
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Trooper,Remy & Fragile


« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2009, 05:38:04 AM »

Mickey- I'm wondering if it could be allergies ? If he had a problem with it in the past,that may be why it shows in the 1 eye only.
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macush
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« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2009, 05:45:57 AM »

Mickey -- I too wonder if it's allergies.  My cat, Macushla, closes one eye (always the same) from time to time.  I took him to the vet but she couldn't see anything wrong with it.  It does seem to happen more often on high pollen days.  Doesn't seem to bother him (no pain or discomfort).  I wash around the eye and then he's fine for a bit.   If it makes you feel better, you should take him and have it checked out.  Smiley
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Steve
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« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2009, 07:27:05 AM »

Thanks everyone.

He's seems fine now. I also thought it is an irritant because he is a crazy monkey running around, and I don't vacuum everyday! But it seems like it is always the left eye, every 6mos- 1 year.

If I took him to the vet now, they wouldn't see anything. But a vet that specializes in eyes could see if it's something more serious?

Does he sleep with his face pushed into a blanket on the left side occasionally?

And yes a Vet eye specialist (Ophthalmologist) is an expert on eyes.

Keep a causal "eye" on this . . but don't let your imagination run wild.  If a pet is rubbing his eye, there is watering, goop, or an obvious condition like that evolving that's another thing.

Be calm
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 08:08:26 AM by Steve » Logged
persianmom
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« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2009, 09:48:57 AM »

It could also be feline herpes.   Most vets don't know what to look for.   I would take my cat ASAP to an Animal Ophthalmologist - it is not only better for the cat to be diagnosed earlier but it will most definately be less costly for you.   
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Steve
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2009, 10:11:33 AM »

It could also be feline herpes.   Most vets don't know what to look for.   I would take my cat ASAP to an Animal Ophthalmologist - it is not only better for the cat to be diagnosed earlier but it will most definately be less costly for you.   

When feline herpes virus hit's the symptoms are very obvious. Watery eyes, sneezing, with the potential for upper respiratory infection. The virus has to run it's course so antibiotics are given to prevent URI.

And this Reference:
There is only one test that is accurate enough to be worth doing if one wants to know for sure if Herpes is present or not, and that is the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) test. This is a DNA test that amplifies the presence of viral DNA so that even one single virus can be detected in a sample from a conjunctival swab. The extreme sensitivity of this test has made it somewhat problematic for laboratories to run. Prior to PCR technology, serum antibody levels were run but widespread vaccination against Herpes has made these results difficult to interpret. At this point, the clinical presentation of the patient is what leads to the diagnosis of Herpes in most cases.

We've had to deal with it. FHV-1. . . It's nasty, vicious, unpredictable, frightening, and takes advantage of weakened immune systems and is triggered by "stress events".

STRESS is the main culprit.


« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 12:07:26 PM by Steve » Logged
Steve
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« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2009, 10:59:06 AM »

Why an Ophthalmologist Counts. Just in case things get severe.

This is our beautiful blue eyed angel girl April, who suffered severe FHV-1 complications with her eyes, 3 months after our Ophthalmologist's care and expertise in Sept 07.



We are forever grateful to our Ophthalmologist for her work.  We took April to her on June 14, 2007 as our Vet recommended.  The eye drops regime at first was very demanding with three different eye medications varying from once to three times daily.

Doctors Comments:

June 14, 2007
I found the following on Aprils ocular exam.

1. Good vision from both eyes other then the cloudiness the corneal lesions cause; healthy intraocular structures.

2. Presumptively (because I am not testing for it) a corneal infection (keratitis) caused by feline ocular herpes virus (FHV-1).

3. Eosinophilic keratitis in the left eye. This is the cause of the raised, lumpy appearance to the cornea. She had numerous eosinophilis (a white blood cell) which has accumulated here due to an over active immune system trying to fight the virus.

4. A small supericial corneal ulcer related to the FHV-1.

She will require the following medications.


June 28, 2007
April has definitely made improvement over the past two weeks. Set up a recheck in one month and please adjust to the following medication schedule.

August 8, 2007
April is doing very well. Both corneas are under control but still will always have the potential to have a flare-up of the keratitis. Please adjust to the following medications schedule and keep up the good work.

May 15, 2008
Aprils corneas look very nice. I feel the chronic eosinophilic keratitis is well controlled. The next routine recheck will be here in 6 months.

Once the crisis was over her medications involved was daily Lysine 500 mg daily indefinately. Pred acetate 1% once drop both eyes three times a week until phase out as instructed.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 11:48:42 AM by Steve » Logged
mickey
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« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2009, 12:06:11 PM »

Can I ask what symptoms she was having that made you take her to an eye doctor?

I have thought in the past that he has allergies. He sometimes sneezes after eating, and when washing up.

There is nothing coming out of the eye, and his eye looks fine.

Is FHV the one that they test for when they're kittens? Or is that FIV? I've had them tested for two things when they were little.

Thanks everyone!
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