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Author Topic: My cat Smokey has hyperthyroidism.  (Read 69801 times)
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catbird
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« Reply #75 on: January 04, 2015, 11:06:46 AM »

I'm glad to hear this good news! Yes, when I finally discovered and switched to a local compounding pharmacy when I was medicating Isis, I found the prices and service to be exceptional. Plus I could get med refills quickly, without having to wait for shipping.
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Mandycat
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« Reply #76 on: January 04, 2015, 10:40:38 PM »

So glad that you found a new compounding pharmacy that is more convenient.  Also, the smaller amount of the gel will work so much better since there is a high chance of a large amount not being absorbed properly and is messy.  Let us know how Smokey is doing with the next testing.
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JustMe
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« Reply #77 on: April 26, 2015, 08:40:26 AM »

So far, so good. Probably will be testing next month or so. Thinking about having the radioiodine treatment done this summer, but still lots of questions. Smokey is gets annoyed with her ear treatments.  She is a very serious people cat, loves to be petted, and held. Wondering how that would work after her treatment.  Think she would do fine at the clinic, but would want to be held a lot when she gets back home. 
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Eventually they will understand,
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Mandycat
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« Reply #78 on: April 26, 2015, 12:41:18 PM »

JM,
So glad to hear that Smokey seems to be doing well.  As far as how the cat is after the treatment, all I can say is that cats are of course individuals, but Mandy was as affectionate as ever, if not more so, after the I131 treatment.  Was a super lap cat!   Smiley
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JustMe
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« Reply #79 on: April 26, 2015, 03:45:54 PM »

That's good to hear Mandycat. I was concerned, also, about when Smokey comes home whether or not we can still snuggle with her or need to hold off a bit.  And what about our other cats?  Sphnyxie is absolutely glued to Smokey.  Will it be safe for Sphynxie to snuggle with Smokey right away?
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Mandycat
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« Reply #80 on: April 26, 2015, 08:29:38 PM »

JM,
I think I may have misunderstood your question.  I was thinking you meant if there was any long-term change in her personality.  We have had people ask question that on the Hyper-t Group.  As for the immediate time when she comes home from the clinic, you will be given instructions to have limited contact with her for 2 weeks.  However, you can mostly ignore that since there is no immediate danger to you or DH from the minimal amount of radiation from Smokey.  The precautions are an effort to limit one's life-time exposure to all forms of radiation.  The actual amount you would be exposed to has been defined by some clinics as what you would receive from a round trip coast to coast airplane trip or a sunny day at the beach.  However, you do need to take care with cleaning the litterbox by wearing gloves and washing hands afterward.  The excess radiation is eliminated in the feces and urine, and the care with changing the litterbox is to be sure that you don't ingest anything from your hands when eating afterwards.  I think it is pretty common to wash hands anyway, but you should also wear the gloves as an additional protection.  Litter will need to be scooped and either flushed (unless you have a septic system), or kept in a container for 90 days before disposing in the regular trash.

There is no danger to the other cats at all.  They can even use the same litterbox as Smokey.  They can snuggle all they want to.  The minimal danger to humans does not apply to cats or dogs since in the rare instance of any kind of issue, it would be years and years before one would see any evidence of it, and cats simply don't live that long.  

The Nuclear Regulatory Agency requires the clinics to give these instructions to clients, but even the clinics themselves will admit that they are way over the top when pushed on the issue.  Some even downplay the importance on their own websites, but still have to give them.

Here is a link to a very interesting article that explains the radiation risks of the I131 treatment to both the cat and the people they live with.  It explains in general what our risks are for cancer through our lifetime just due to our normal everyday exposure to background radiation.  Then it also gives information about what increased risk you would have from your cat after the treatment, which is an additional risk of about 1/100th of 1 percent (0.01%).

           http://www.avmi.net/services/radiotherapy/risks/  
« Last Edit: April 26, 2015, 08:44:17 PM by Mandycat » Logged
ranger
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« Reply #81 on: April 27, 2015, 04:45:47 AM »

The worse thing for me was keeping the used litter for 3 months when Socks had it. I did sleep on my tiny loveseat but I wouldn't have done that if I was doing it over.  I only had the one cat so wouldn't you have to keep all the used litter for 3 months unless you keep the cat separate? I was told cats had to be kept separate which was why Mia didn't have it done. I worry keeping her on the drug has caused her current problems.
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macush
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« Reply #82 on: April 27, 2015, 06:23:31 AM »

One warning..when my Dunkin had the treatment, they did not warn me about the cat litter.  When I finally threw it out in the trash, it set off the radiation alarms at the DPW depot.  They had to sort out the truck to find the cause.  I had tossed an envelope in with the trash, so they had no trouble finding me.  Fortunately for me, the DPW director had cats and knew about the I131 treatment and so did not charge me (it could have been about $2,000 for the time they spent emptying the truck)!  Dunkin had no side effects and was back in my arms as soon as he came home.  It's been 10+ years and there have been no problems since.  The only thing that hurt was, since he had to be there for three days, I brought along his favorite blanket but I couldn't get it back.
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Sandi K
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« Reply #83 on: June 15, 2015, 10:33:48 PM »

JM, how is Smokey doing?  Has there been any decision on doing the I131 yet?  Thinking of you! Kiss
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