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Author Topic: Could fake taurine be responsible for an increase in feline heart disease?  (Read 20546 times)
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Steve
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« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2010, 08:52:50 PM »

SHIPPER
CHANGSHU YUDONG CHEM FACTORY
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CONSIGNEE
EOS DIRECT,LLC.
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ARRIVAL DATE
2009-03-30

CARGO WEIGHT
34600 KG . . (76279.9 Pounds)  (38 Tons)

http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cache:5ksMABvAHyAJ:www.importgenius.com/importers/eos-direct-llc.html+EOS+DIRECT,LLC.&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a

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Changshu Renoke Food-additive Science CO.,LTD(Changshu Yudong Chemical CO., LTD. ... Address: No.88, Yingbin Rd. Wangshi Haiyu Town Changshu City Jiangsu

« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 09:01:31 PM by Steve » Logged
bug
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RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2010, 09:00:38 PM »

3cat, Bones, over the years here, had been eating dry: Iams, Purina One, Orijen, Acana, Go, Felidae, TOTW, Hills r/d. Since 2007, it was Orijen and Acana for the most part. Wet: Go, Holistic Select, Wellness, EVO, Nature's Variety, Hills a/d, Medi-Cal, Felidae, Evangers, Performatrin Ultra,  (before the Mars takeover). Pip, Mia and Katey have all been on the same food in the same period of time and they don't have a heart condition. Mia's heart was confirmed healthy when she had her MRI in 2008. Bones' condition was confirmed to be hypertrophic c. by ultrasound. Pip had a temporarily enlarged heart and went into congestive heart failure in 2004, but we're not sure why. It was fine after we got the fluid off (vets were betting on heartworm).
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My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
petslave
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« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2010, 09:21:10 PM »

Does anyone know if the standard diagnostic techniques pick up the differences in the types of heart problems in cats?  I'm sure the more specialized ones would, but I'm wondering if a vet at a regular practice can tell the difference between dialated, hypertrophic, etc.  If not, they may be diagnosing on the assumption it wouldn't be food-related, when it could be.
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catbird
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« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2010, 09:27:08 PM »

I think you need an echocardiogram and a cardiologist to tell the difference between the different types.  A regular vet exam, or even an ECG, won't tell you enough.  You need images of the heart to see where the problems are.

Echoes are a pretty expensive procedure, and I'd bet a lot of people don't opt for them.  Case in point, an acquaintance of mine had a cat who suddenly collapsed last year and then died some months later.  A heart problem was diagnosed when he first collapsed, and he was put on meds based on the physical exam and blood pressure, but an echo was never done.

I'd say you are likely right in your thinking, petslave.
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JJ
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« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2010, 10:07:26 PM »

catbird would this mean that there could be food that people are feeding that is deficient in taurine (levels waaayyy too low) that are harming the cats hearts? Since you posted this thread I also thought back over the fact that too many of our members babies have gone to the bridge in such a short time. Have felt that for past few weeks.
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Sandi K
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« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2010, 11:31:37 PM »

catbird, nothing would surprise me anymore.  There is so little testing and quality control required by any of these companies from what Ive seen, it seems to me it would be so easy for something like this to happen. 
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JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2010, 05:20:41 AM »

Does anyone know if the standard diagnostic techniques pick up the differences in the types of heart problems in cats?  I'm sure the more specialized ones would, but I'm wondering if a vet at a regular practice can tell the difference between dialated, hypertrophic, etc.  If not, they may be diagnosing on the assumption it wouldn't be food-related, when it could be.

This link has some information under "Diagnosis of congestive heart failure in cats" about diagnostic studies.

http://www.vetinfo.com/feline-congestive-heart-failure-symptoms.html

If there is a significant murmur, might be best to get an echocardiogram/ultrasound of the heart.  I've been unable to talk to my vet about the Cardiopet proBNP blood test to see if he can run that.  I'm very interested in starting with that before running any ultrasounds.   The BNP test (brain natriuretic peptide or B-type natriuretic peptide) is routinely run in human ER's when heart disease is suspected or known.

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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Offy
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« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2010, 06:22:09 AM »

I found an article with HCM & DCM to read to help me understand the differences:

http://www.neamc.com/aec_wvh_web/client%20library/feline__hypertrophic__cardiomyop.htm

Another thought is to look at the requirements of cats in amino acids to see if they impact HCM/DCM:

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+1399&aid=2575

Did any of the cats also have thyroid issues?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 06:24:35 AM by Beyond Pissed » Logged

"If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive." Dr. R. Glenn Brown. Canadian Veterinary Journal, Volume 35, in April of 1994
JustMe
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« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2010, 06:31:36 AM »

Did any of the cats also have thyroid issues?

Twit had very recently been diagnosed with hyperthyroidism.
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Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
Offy
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« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2010, 07:02:22 AM »

The vet was worried that Ling at an awfully young age is showing signs of Hyper-T. I haven't been able to do the blood work , so I can't really help much but give one of the links I'd collected (which increased my worries).

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6540256

"The study showed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy develops in most hyperthyroid cats, some of which also develop congestive heart failure. Although the signs of heart disease in primary myocardial disease and thyrotoxic disease are similar, the characteristic signalment and clinical signs of hyperthyroidism should lead one to suspect the association of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with the hyperthyroidism."
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"If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive." Dr. R. Glenn Brown. Canadian Veterinary Journal, Volume 35, in April of 1994
JustMe
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My RB Angels Elvis, 1991-2010, and Twit, 2001-2010


« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2010, 08:21:16 AM »

We also need to look at what amount of MSG (monosodium glutamate) is in pet food.  I have found several links that claim MSG can cause taurine deficiency.  Still looking for links that I would consider authoritative, however, this articles also mentions the possible role of bacteria in taurine deficiency.

http://www.ehow.com/how-does_4731002_what-causes-taurine-deficiency.html
« Last Edit: February 06, 2010, 08:27:45 AM by JustMe » Logged

Eventually they will understand,
Replied the glorious cat
For I will whisper into their hearts
That I am always with them
I just am....forever and ever and ever.
Poem for Cats, author unknown

"A kitten in the animal kingdom is like a rosebud in a garden", author unknown
bug
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RIP little angel Katey


« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2010, 06:12:36 PM »

BP, one could only hope that if a cat is diagnosed with HCM, they would also be diagnosed with hyperthyroidism because if you cure the latter, you also cure the former. I had Bones tested for hyperthyroidism and unfortunately, he didn't have it. He also didn't have hypertension, which would be another contributor.

Vets can also see an enlarged heart on an x-ray but it isn't always evident. Veterinary ultrasonographers can distinguish between types of cardiomyopathies from the measurements they take and the thickness of the myocardial layers on the echo.
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My little babies, you'll always be in my heart. Mom will see you later. Look after each other, ok?
JJ
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« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2010, 12:46:42 AM »

JM how would one know which food contains MSG - it is not listed on the labels, unless its one of those 'natural flavors' listings that have nothing after it to tell you what they mean by those words?

Is that what's in kitty crack - a ton of MSG. KFC all their food is loaded with it and that's what makes one eat so much and want more is this MSG.

So food is deficient in taurine and loaded with MSG?
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Your blessings be more,
And nothing but happiness
Come through your door
raggiesrule
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« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2010, 01:45:14 AM »

Geez this is scarey and none of us need it happening again. Wondering how long the FDA will take to do something about the inadequate Taurine levels in the RC - that is just negligence on part of the company (regardless of what they think). I will be sending an email to the breeder rep here about this matter as it is very concerning as is the company's response. This is not about you blaming a company for your cats beig sick. This is about cats dying of DCM and you having lab tests that clearly show the food is deficient in Taurine.

And has already been said if it is happening to one comapny it will be happening to more.

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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2010, 01:34:39 PM »

Ricky Fund for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Research

Do you know a cat affected by heart disease? The most common feline heart disease is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Cardiomyopathy is a term that means disease of the heart muscle. While many cats will live a normal life with HCM, others will suffer devastating consequences of the disease, such as heart failure, paralysis due to blood clot formation, and death. Unfortunately, few effective treatments are available for this common disease of cats. HCM is also a disease of humans, affecting about one in every 500 people. Sadly, only a tiny fraction of all HCM research funding goes to help cats. You can change that!

In June 2002, Winn announced the creation of the Ricky Fund, set up to accept donations specifically for HCM research. Steve Dale is a nationally syndicated pet columnist, radio show host and now a Winn board member. Steve created the research fund in memory of his Devon Rex cat, Ricky, who died of HCM. During a routine physical examination at one year of age, Ricky's veterinarian detected a heart murmur, and Ricky was eventually diagnosed with HCM. Sadly, Ricky died too young, at the age of four. In one of his columns, Steve wrote, "Ricky was a very small cat, but the hole he left in our hearts is enormous. Our house seems empty without him."

The Ricky Fund has raised tens of thousands of dollars for HCM research, and has funded studies evaluating issues such as the genetics of HCM and potential therapies. With Valentine's Day not far off, you can do something good for the heart and join Steve in the fight against HCM by donating today to the Ricky Fund.

Examples of Ricky Fund Projects


Anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin in normal cats: University of Pennsylvania; 2003.

Effect of pirfenidone on myocardial fibrosis and diastolic function in feline familial HCM: University of California, Davis; 2005

Molecular evaluation of the feline alpha tropomyosin gene in Norwegian Forest, Sphynx, Siberian, Ragdoll and Maine Coon cats with familial HCM: Washington State University; 2008

Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: five year outcomes and risk assessment: The Animal Medical Center; 2009

http://us1.campaign-archive.com/?u=415b3f2ea14ea9e3390df93aa&id=bcfb359858&e=1a27a27aa1


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