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Author Topic: barking and growling dog...  (Read 10712 times)
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Deborah
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« on: March 22, 2011, 07:44:11 AM »

Hello all!  Has been a long time since I posted ...but when this issue came up with my bosses dog I knew someone here would be able to help Cheesy

Anyway, her dog is an 11 year old black lab/rottie...looks like a lab...so not sure how much is rottie.  Anyway, he was raised in a hair salon...coming to the salon as a puppy...getting love from all the clients.  He is the sweetest dog and well behaved...until the past few months...a client comes in ...and he will bark and/or growl...even if he knows and loves this client.  As soon as the client calls him by name he will go over and start wagging his tail and all is fine. My boss gave him a week or two away from the salon to see if that would help...he is some better but is still having the issues.

Any ideas why?  A friend of mine said a Dr. friend of hers had the same issue with her 2 labs, when they turned 10 they started growling at the clients and she had to leave them at home.

No change in diet...he is on a raw diet. 

Thanks for any suggestions!!

Deborah
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catbird
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2011, 08:38:15 AM »

I am no dog expert, but with any pet, this kind of change in behavior could indicate a health problem.  I'd recommend a thorough vet exam with senior blood work.  Maybe some of the dog people will have ideas as to specifics that could be looked for.
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shadowmice
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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2011, 09:23:57 AM »

Assuming no other health issues are contributing, it may be a case with being an older dog, he is losing some of his eyesight and so does not properly recognize the people when he first sees them. The fact that once he hears the person call him he is friendly and greets them makes me think he may not be seeing things very well.

My brother's dog had issues with his vision - he could not see well and would at times growl at people he knew until he was close enough to either see them better or smell them. Once he could tell who it was, he would be happy and friendly again.

But as already mentioned, changes in behaviour can be a symptom of more serious health issues, so it would be wise for a vet to check out the dog if that hasn't already been done.
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Deborah
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« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2011, 10:32:16 AM »

Thanks for the replies so far....I do know that he had blood work done in the past few months...only thing that came up was low thyroid...he's been taking kelp supplements for that.

Will share the vision idea with my boss...

So appreciate all the help!
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JJ
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« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2011, 01:27:41 PM »

Deb has the salon started using any new products from say a new mfg. that it didn't before? If so, maybe the product has something in it that may be making the dog more aggressive because of a chemical reaction. Just another thing to consider.
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mikken
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« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2011, 04:10:09 PM »

Thanks for the replies so far....I do know that he had blood work done in the past few months...only thing that came up was low thyroid...he's been taking kelp supplements for that.


I can't stress how VERY important it is to get the low thyroid treated PROPERLY with a thyroid medication.  Kelp supplements will only help if the dog has an iodine deficiency (which is VERY unlikely) and delaying treatment (with real meds) will result in increased risk of health issues AND behavior problems.

Here's a list of hypothyroidism symptoms -

http://www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels.com/clinicalsignscaninehypothyroidism.htm

Behavior issues can get quite bad and quite weird with low thyroid, so it's VITALLY NECESSARY that this owner get this dog on meds as soon as humanly possible.  I say this as someone who has been there, had a holistic vet talk me into kelp supplements rather than meds, and had my dog suffer serious damage as a result.  Never again.

FWIW.


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Mandycat
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« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2011, 04:20:49 PM »

Deborah,
I totally agree with mikken.  Both hypothyroidism (common in dogs) and hyperthyroidism (common in cats) must be treated adequately with medication to avoid additional health risks.  I have nothing against people using holistic treatments, but there are no holistic treatments for thyroid issues that do anything to control the problem.  Aggression can happen in cats with hyperthyroidism as well as in dogs with hypothyroidism.  That is probably the least problematic of the things that can happen considering all the medical issues that can arise from these conditions, but still must be taken seriously.  The aggression will most likely subside once the dog is treated adequately with medication.

ETA: I want to add that treating a dog with hypothyroidism is a much more natural process anyway since they are just give the natural thyroid hormone supplement rather than a harsh chemical medication that cats get for hyperthyroidism.  There are no harmful side effects since it is something that is usually naturally produced in the body.  Please have your friend look into this ASAP.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2011, 04:25:34 PM by Mandycat » Logged
lesliek
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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2011, 04:33:03 PM »

I have the same problem with 2 of ours who have eyesight issues. cataracts for Fragile & damage from scratches for Remy, they both are fine once they hear the person or smell them too. The thyroid issue needs attention, it could be the cause but more importantly it could cause other ,even worse problems. Not all animals with thyroid problems need drugs or surgery or treatment. But only a specialist can determine that, and usually with frequent thyroid testing. Trooper had high & low thyroid hormones the 1st 8 years of his life [he is 13] and had bloodwork drawn every 6 months that was sent to U of Michigan to a specialist. He never required treatment, but that was always reconsidered with every test. Make sure they are doing free T4 and T3. We never really found what was causing his problem and his results since have been normal. He currently has them tested yearly.
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Deborah
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« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2011, 03:44:36 PM »

Thank you all so very much for the vital information...I will share this with my boss about the low thyroid symptoms, etc.

*the Salon is AVEDA...so only plant based products Smiley
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JJ
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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2011, 03:53:08 PM »

Good to know there are no heavy duty chemicals that the dog is exposed to. Update when you can after your boss has a chance to take the dog to the vet.
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