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Author Topic: dvr recorder connection question  (Read 6975 times)
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ranger
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« on: August 29, 2014, 04:13:17 AM »

Ok not actually a computer q but I've already called the manufacturer and asked on Amazon where I purchased.

I have old tv's that have picture tubes so I ordered this dvd recorder/vcr to transfer some old tapes to dvd.

The unit does not have a tuner (I honestly do not know what that means, I thought it was the same as converter to unscramble picture).

It also does not have the two screw in coax connections that every vcr / dvd player I have owned does and that is how my vcr's have been connected to cable.

My big cable box is connected thru the non working dvd player so when I disconnected it my internet went out.

I am technology inept.
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caylee
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« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2014, 05:25:04 AM »

I'm afraid that you are going to have to have a cable tech make a house call to get everything connected up right. As for your new DVD player not having a tuner (that is what allows the DVD to 'tune in the channels' on the TV.) Your new DVD player will have to be connected directly to the cable box, but it still may not work with your old TV's. The cable box is suppose to act as your 'tuner' but because you have an old TV you are going to have to use a converter box somewhere in the connection. The simple solution is to purchase a new TV that will work with your cable, and new DVD. I'm not a tech so do not know how to get your system up and running, but I did do some research when the new digital TV's came out. If you know any friends that have done this, you may want to take them along before you buy a new TV. It is  very tricky to get the old analog products working with the new digital products.

Hope this helps somewhat.

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catbird
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« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2014, 07:32:33 AM »

Hi ranger,

I agree with caylee's suggestion that calling a cable tech might be the simplest way to go if this is not something you are good at. I would guess, however, that you are probably trying to save money and not have to pay for a service call.

The connection setups on DVD/VCRs, converters, TVs, etc. are not all the same, so without seeing exactly what you have, I can't really talk you through it online, although I have done some similar adapting on an older TV that has only cable or antenna input, in one of my spare rooms (it's tricky and you end up having to use cable switches).

Virtually all video equipment these days connects via colored plug-in connectors (usually yellow, white, and red, but sometimes there are other colors, and there are other types of connectors too; my main TV has about 5 different options and it's several years old.) So no, your new DVD/VCR would not have cable input and possibly not cable output either.

Maybe you could weigh the cost of the service call against the cost of a new TV (they are getting to be relatively inexpensive). The new TV might be a better long-term option, but chances are you would have to figure out the new setup, which could mean a service call anyway, or at least trips to the hardware or electronics store for connectors, etc.

If you are just looking to use the new DVD/VCR to convert tapes to DVDs, you might be able to do that directly through the DVD/VCR itself, without hooking it into your system just yet. All you might need to do is plug it in, put in the tape and the blank DVD, and go. The instruction manual would tell you.

Good luck, and sorry I can't be of more help without seeing it. Undecided  Do you have a neighbor, friend, or relative who could take a look at it?
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GKit
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« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2014, 08:56:37 AM »

Ranger, as catbird said, the easiest thing is if you are only looking to transfer VHS to DVD, is to connect the unit directly to the TV, if possible, and leave your original setup as it was.  Is your new unit a Magnavox? That is the brand I have, so I may be able to help. The other thing is to know how many devices your TV accepts as input, so there should be some red-white-yellow jacks labelled "input 1" or other number on the back, sides or front of your TV. 

The other option, which is more complex to talk through without being able to see the jacks, is to use an old VCR with the coax input as the tuner unit, if you have one. That is what I did with mine. 
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petslave
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« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2014, 01:30:55 PM »

There are also shops that that can copy tapes to DVD for you.  I'm not sure if that's expensive, or reliable, but might be an option if it looks like you'll have to buy even more equipment.
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caylee
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« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2014, 05:20:42 PM »

Judy,
This morning when I posted, I was in a hurry to leave for work and didn't stop to think about how expensive a new TV for you may be. I'm sorry. I did not mean to be insensitive. I was only remembering my own headaches with the analog to digital incompatibility issues and wanted to write something down quickly for you before I left.

I'm still very angry with the government for forcing the change-over on every one. The analog TV signals were much better than the digital signals, as the new channels will just blank out for no reason and you may miss part of your program. The converter boxes cost about $50 each and do not last. I am on my third box since the change-over. I only have one TV hooked up to a converter box and VCR. I do have one early digital TV which only has input places, no out-put holes. A VCR cannot be hooked up to it to record because of this. So if you do opt for a new TV, make sure that it will be able to do both in-put and out-put before you buy it.

I do hope that someone can help you get your set-up working with your new DVD/VCR unit.

Hugs
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lesliek
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2014, 05:58:37 AM »

Are there any teens in your building ? They usually know way more than we do about any tech questions & might be able to hook it up for you .
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ranger
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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2014, 09:49:48 AM »

I went out and bought a new tv and I still can't get the thing to work.  I'm going to try and return it to Amazon.  I called the tv company and someone was to call me back this morning which of course they did not.  I have connected the dvd/vcr directly to the tv and nothing. 

I did go to Radio Shack and asked about a tuner, then Best Buy noone ever heard of a tuner. So I bought a new tv and was told I could just connect directly. 

It used to be a lot easier to do things. I thought technology made your life easier.
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caylee
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« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2014, 11:05:31 AM »

Judy, the 'tuner' was an important part of the older VCR's that allowed you to be able to program the VCR to select the day, time, and channel of the program you wished to record. Why they started leaving it out after the digital conversion - I haven't a clue. But to solve the problem, I've been told, you will need to buy a 'analog to digital converter box' for the VCR/DVD, not a 'tuner'. The converter box will act as your VCR tuner, I've been told. This is the same converter box that one uses to get the digital TV channels to work on a old analog TV. I think they can be purchased at Target yet.

Some of the newer digital TV's also lack the 'output'  connection, making it impossible to record a program using a VCR/DVD. This may be your problem with the new TV you just bought.

I think I mentioned this up-thread, but at the time of the switch over from analog to digital TV, I also bought a new digital TV. That TV works just fine using over the air signals, but I cannot connect a VCR to it to record off the TV because it also lacks the output connection necessary to do this. No, you and I are not the dumb ones here - the manufactures are!  Cheesy . They are, by design, making it hard to record off the air like we used to be able to do.  Angry  They also, by design, are not being honest with the public in their set-up instructions.  Angry

Since you have cable, I would buy a converter box from Target or wherever. Then call the cable company out (yes, you will probably have to pay the guy) to help you get it set up. If that tech guy finds that your new TV is also lacking the needed output connection, have him connect the new DVD/VCR and converter box using your old TV and the cable connection. You can then return the new TV you just bought to Amazon saying that THEY were not honest with you by not disclosing that the TV lacked the output connection. That is fraud. They need to tell you what you are getting and not getting. After telling them that, you should have no problem getting your money back.  Smiley

Hoping things work out for you.



« Last Edit: September 14, 2014, 11:10:05 AM by caylee » Logged
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