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Author Topic: E-book wars, devices, software, book pricing - bye-bye paperbacks  (Read 4865 times)
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3catkidneyfailure
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« on: February 09, 2010, 05:29:38 PM »

There's Amazon's Kindle ($200), Sony's reader, Barnes & Nobles free downloadable e-book software,
soon to be Apple's I-pad.
Then there's the cheapie paperback books at WalMart that are going bye-bye.

It looks like the good news is that Google will be selling e-books that can be read on any device that can connect to the internet, which means phones or netbooks or tablets or laptops or desktops. The bad news is the prices are going to be fixed by the book publishers at 12.99 to 14.99, which sucks, and I believe paperbacks will disappear.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/09/books/09google.html?th=&emc=th&pagewanted=print
 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

February 9, 2010
Publishers Win a Bout in E-Book Price Fight

"If Google does enter the e-book market, it would be one of a handful of programs under which the company sells content directly to consumers. Google generates the majority of its revenue from ad sales on its search pages and on the Web sites of publishing partners. It is now charging for content through its YouTube unit, renting digital versions of independent films tied to the Sundance Film Festival."

Kind of worrisome if Google were to become major purveyors of books, newspapers, and movies. Of course, Apple is already headed there

« Last Edit: February 09, 2010, 05:41:53 PM by 3catkidneyfailure » Logged
Sandi K
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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 05:42:22 PM »

I wonder if they will also have some rule like they do with DVD's that you cant share them with anyone else...my mom & sister buy books and share them with each other to help cut down on cost, if they get rid of paperbacks and put a rule on no sharing on e-books, that would be terrible.
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Mandycat
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 07:08:09 PM »

I hope that the printed book never disappears.  I do not like to even read a newspaper on-line let alone read a whole book on some kind of device I have to have connected to the internet.   Angry
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catbird
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« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 07:23:43 PM »

I bought my "techie" daughter, who is also a voracious reader of books and very literate, a Kindle for Christmas.  She loves it.  They are much different from reading on a computer; it's really like reading a paper and print book, much easier on the eyes.  Plus the books you buy are downloaded into the device, so you are only connected when you are purchasing a book.

I can see where the ereaders could be a great help for people with physical handicaps who can't lug around or hold heavy books.  Even a paperback can be hard to hold open sometimes.  Since you can also make the print any size you want, these could also be great for the visually impaired, as not all titles are available in large print in paper books, but any title available would effectively be in large print with this device.

For people who do not have ready access to books and bookstores, home-bound, etc. ereaders could be great devices, too.  I'm thinking of buying one for my 80-year-old arthritic mother.
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Sandi K
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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 07:40:57 PM »

Oh I hadnt thought of that catbird!  I saw on TV the other night how you turn a page almost like a real book!  Techie stuff is amazing.
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lesliek
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2010, 07:41:55 PM »

The kindle does seem the most like a real book. But I guess I am just old fashioned, I like a real book.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 04:54:55 AM »

I guess we have to think in terms of sustainability [very trendy these days, even though
I love the feel and smell and texture of books, too) to the save a tree era.

Anyway, if you have access to an e-Media library and a library card, like I do, the library is always
open, there are no late fees, and 3:00 am is always a good time to download a new book or video or
music CD! I'm just glad these reader devices are not going to get a monopoly on the market.
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catwoods
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« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2010, 01:13:22 PM »

I hope there will be room for both electronic and "traditional" books. I too love everything about a real book.

If more of the paper industry would just gear up to use cotton and a number of other crops that can be grown, rather than pulpwood, that would help the tree situation. It would be more expensive at first I guess but you'd think the cost could come down as the industry became "in place". Although, come to think of it, the yield per acre might not be as high since pines grow so tall. Still... Paper can be made out of anything cellulosic, even kudzu, although that plant is darn hard to harvest. Many plant materials are used to make paper for art projects.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 01:27:16 PM by catwoods » Logged
JustMe
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« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2010, 01:23:08 PM »

Rather OT, but some of the local newspapers here are fighting to stay alive.  The state wants to allow towns/cities to post their public notices on their own websites rather than in the newspapers.  This really is ridiculous.  A lot of people don't even have internet access, not to mention older people who rely on the newspaper.  We see how quicky information can disappear from a website.  Where will the permanent record be? 

I'd hate to see printed books disappear.  Would be a very sad day indeed.
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catwoods
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« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2010, 11:26:55 PM »

I wouldn't want to see newpapers vanish, or books on paper, either. There are a substantial number of people who don't have computers. JustMe, I think you are right, some knowledge is vanishing.

I can also see the advantages of ereaders as Catbird described above. I just about can't get out to the library myself, and for the moment, DH can't either. Maybe each form will enhance readership of the other.
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JJ
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« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2010, 01:15:09 AM »

Hemp is a great thing that you can make all kinds of things out of. Henry Ford even built a car out of it. If this was used for making books, no need to cut down trees anymore. My sister is a voracious reader and wouldn't want real books to disappear either. There is a place for both in this world, the E-books and real ones.
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3catkidneyfailure
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« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2010, 06:34:45 AM »

Saw a report in techy type newsletter that Google is starting trials of ultra high speed fiber systems today, Feb 11, 2010.
Same speeds they have in Japan and Europe but not here unless you pay very high prices.
Would take supposedly less than 5 minutes to download a movie, for example.
Google will make the service available to a number of vendors; so hopefully the price will come down for all of us.
That would be great. An entire ebook would be a few seconds on that kind of internet speed.

As long as computer files are backed up somewhere, they don't disappear, but there wouldn't be any more
stacks of books to roam. I'd miss that, too.
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catwoods
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« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2010, 02:22:11 PM »

JJ, hemp is indeed a prime candidate for making tree free paper. Kenaf is another possibility:

http://www.ecomall.com/greenshopping/kenafx.htm

Growing a crop or maybe several of these plants every year might prove more cost-effective than waiting years for pines to grow.

Many things can be made out of kudzu besides paper - flour, cattle fodder; even ethanol ("kudzunol") is being tried. Harvesting difficulties would need to be worked out, but one big advantage is that it has no natural insect enemies in the US, so there is no need for pesticides. Fertilizers would probably not be needed either. It's a tough plant. Some herbicides just make it grow faster.

3cat, going through stacks of books in libraries, bookstores and yard sales is one of my all time favorite things to do.

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JoMax
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« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2010, 02:57:20 PM »

Quote
going through stacks of books in libraries, bookstores and yard sales is one of my all time favorite things to do

- Me too - for me especially in what we over here call 'charity shops'. (i.e. secondhand books/clothes/bric-a-brac shops staffed by volunteers & proceeds above rent/elec go to charity.  My closest one is the local Cats Protection League  Grin) There's something about browsing a limited selection and finding something good - browsing on the net has too many possibilities....

I rarely buy a book new, even if there's one I specifically want I go for the 'used' ones on amazon.
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catwoods
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« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2010, 07:26:44 PM »

JoMax I like the books on amazon too, if there's a book I want to keep around; otherwise we use the library. I'd like to support authors, and local bookstores, by buying new books locally, but it just isn't financially possible.

Libraries here have sales of some donated old books and also magazines. I used to get old issues of Cat Fancy and National Geographic there.
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